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  #51  
Old 12-06-2005, 06:24 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is online now
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How many codes can I screw up in one thread?
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  #52  
Old 12-06-2005, 06:36 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is offline
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Originally Posted by Guinastasia
Dijon Warlock, I don't know if it was a first addition-it was at Borders in oh, 2001? Isn't the book a lot older than that?
The book was published in 1994. First editions would have been long gone by 2001. (My ex has a first printing--autographed by Terry Jones, no less.) I see that there's a new edition out, however, with a bonus DVD.
  #53  
Old 12-06-2005, 09:29 PM
Tuckerfan Tuckerfan is offline
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Originally Posted by iamthewalrus(:3=
Sounds like he ripped both stories off from Heinlein. The time travel story appears to be a mix of By His Bootstraps and All you Zombies..., while tribbles bear an uncanny resemblance to the martian fuzzballs in The Rolling Stones.
And he had to admit that he borrowed the idea from Heinlein, IIRC.
  #54  
Old 12-06-2005, 10:48 PM
Lissla Lissar Lissla Lissar is offline
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We've got Dancing With Cats on remainder at the store where I work. At least one customer has bought it under the impression that it's serious. I made some light-hearted comment and got one of those lost, flaky stares, as she said, "But it's really about cat dancing. It's not a parody."

Why Paint Cats is hysterical. I think Dancing and Why Cats Paint are by the same people, but Why Paint Cats isn't.

I found a complete guide to hot dog cookery in a used bookstore a few years ago. It looked to be printed in the Seventies.
  #55  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:28 PM
Lisa-go-Blind Lisa-go-Blind is offline
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Originally Posted by Lissla Lissar
Why Paint Cats is hysterical. I think Dancing and Why Cats Paint are by the same people, but Why Paint Cats isn't.
According to Amazon, all three books are by the same authors, Heather Busch and Burton Silver.
  #56  
Old 12-07-2005, 12:03 AM
Regallag_The_Axe Regallag_The_Axe is offline
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I've read some wierd short stories by Frank Herbert (author of the original six Dune novels). I don't remember the titles of all the stories but they were in an anthology called The worlds of Frank Herbert
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  #57  
Old 12-07-2005, 11:55 PM
Dijon Warlock Dijon Warlock is offline
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Originally Posted by Guinastasia
That should be Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book. And she was a MAD woman.



Dijon Warlock, I don't know if it was a first addition-it was at Borders in oh, 2001? Isn't the book a lot older than that?
Depends on what you mean by "a lot." It was originally published in Great Britain in 1994 by Pavilion Books Limited. So kinda older, but not dreadfully. I've always loved Froud, and this book (which I actully read all the way through, and is rather interesting) absolutely cracked me up. Have you ever seen the book "FAERIES" by Brian Froud and Alan Lee? That was my first Froud experience. There was recently a 25th anniversary reprint of it published.

Brian Froud's website http://www.worldoffroud.com/ is a joy, and his wife Wendy was the puppet designer for Yoda, as well as some of the characters in The Dark Crystal.

I'm trying to think of other strange books that I have. I've got an old edition of "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" with illustrations by Gustave Dore, but there's no date. I have a copy of a small (4"x6") of a book entitled "Modern Ghosts," published by Harpers, and stating nothing but a copyright of 1890. It evidently sat for the majority of a hundred years in the Free Public Library in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, but was never read. When I grabbed it from a used bookstore ($5.00), the page edges hadn't been trimmed, and I had to cut the thing open at several places just to read it. That was kind a neat experience: to know that I was the first person to read a 100 year old book.

I also own a copy of a book on alphabets published in Würzburg in 1893, some of which are completely obsolete, and others of which (Russian, for example) have been altered in the intervening century. It's all in German, except for the page on German, which is written in English.

I also have an illustrated copy of "Salome" by Oscar Wilde that was printed in 1945, which is not only hand-illuminated (gold paint on several illustrations), but also printed in (help me out here: quarto, maybe?) a fashion where the tops of every pair of pages are still connected.

Then there is "The Monuments of Mars: A City on the Edge of Forever" by Richard Hoagland: all about the Face on Mars, and how it (and everything else) proves a prior civilization. That was a gift, so I didn't waste money on it. Still, it was a fascinating read...even if he's completely off his rocker.

Tear me out of my bookshelf before I kill a hamster.
  #58  
Old 12-08-2005, 08:17 AM
Podkayne Podkayne is offline
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My first Froud experience was Ultra-Violet Catastrophe! or The Unexpected Walk with Great-Uncle Magnus Pringle. It was one of my favorite books when I was a sprout.

Boy, was I in for a head-swimming case of deja vous when I started studying quantum theory.

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Podkayne "Horrible Stumper" Fries, Tree Pirate.
  #59  
Old 12-08-2005, 08:28 AM
Mr. Goob Mr. Goob is online now
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I'm a machinist and am on the lookout for old tools and books about machine shop stuff.

Oddest book yet is a 300+ page hardcover "The history of the grinding wheel" I leafed through it whan I got home. I'd rather watch paint dry than look at it again.
  #60  
Old 12-08-2005, 06:54 PM
ryobserver ryobserver is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Goob
I'm a machinist and am on the lookout for old tools and books about machine shop stuff.

Oddest book yet is a 300+ page hardcover "The history of the grinding wheel" I leafed through it whan I got home. I'd rather watch paint dry than look at it again.
That reminds me of the brick-sized "A History of Beer and Brewing" from the Royal Society of Chemistry. 700+ pages if I recall, and only a few of them interesting, even though I like beer. It's an accomplishment to make beer boring. The RSC likes to issue titles for lay audiences like "The Science of Chocolate" and "The Science of Ice Cream" which would be a lot more popular if they weren't so damn expensive ("The Science of Ice Cream" is $59.95 for Og's sake).

Another oddity sent to my workplace was an alleged history of vodka (I wouldn't bet on its accuracy, though parts of it were entertaining) that also rated various brands using one to three hammer-and-sickle symbols. This book was written well nearly 15 years after the fall of the Soviet Union, and the whole idea of rating vodkas with hammers-and-sickles is about as tasteful as rating Rhine wines with swastikas anyway.
  #61  
Old 12-08-2005, 11:17 PM
Lissla Lissar Lissla Lissar is offline
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We have The Alaskan Bootlegger's Bible at work. The back says something like, "This book has such good instructions for building stills and making your own hooch that it would be very easy to do so, if it weren't illegal" (paraphrased). I keep thinking of buying it for someone, but I'm not sure who.
  #62  
Old 12-09-2005, 01:24 AM
marque elf marque elf is offline
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I was a fan of Norman Spinrad's when I was in high school. He wrote a book called The Iron Dream. It was ostensibly a science fiction novel written by Adolph Hitler, a painter and writer living in Paris who had dabbled in radical politics in his youth. Very strange and I'm still not sure whether it was a work of genius or psychosis.

Spinrad also gave us Men In The Jungle, where the 3 protagonists go to a frontier world to foment a revolution in order to gain wealth and power. Things get weird very quickly and there are lavish descriptions of canabalism and rape in the book. Reading the book made me feel dirty, as if I had somehow been made an accomplice in the atrocities.
  #63  
Old 12-09-2005, 02:49 AM
Johanna Johanna is offline
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Finnegans Wake
  #64  
Old 12-09-2005, 07:02 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
Sounds like he ripped both stories off from Heinlein. The time travel story appears to be a mix of By His Bootstraps and All you Zombies..., while tribbles bear an uncanny resemblance to the martian fuzzballs in The Rolling Stones.
In his book The Trouble with Tribbles (which is about writing the script, not a novelization), Gerrold claims that he didn't have Heinlein consciously in mind while writing "Tribbles" -- he says he thought he was retelling the story of rabbits in Australia. It wasn't until later, when somebody pointed out the similarity that he realized it, and recalled reading the book and the flatcats. Some people claim that he got permission from Heinlein, but that's clearly not true. I believe that he contacted Heinlein about it at one point, and Heinlein was cool with it.

As I noted above, TWHFH was a conscious attempt to cram every time travel cliche into a single volume, so of course he referred to Heinlein's stories -- as well as everyyone else's. It's not exactly a "rip off".
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  #65  
Old 02-05-2017, 12:38 AM
Bibliothecarius Bibliothecarius is offline
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What, no mention of the Codex Seraphinianus yet?

These strange books consist of whole lists of strange books:
Fish Who Answer the Telephone and Other Bizarre Books
How to Avoid Huge Ships and Other Implausibly Titled Books
  #66  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:26 AM
penultima thule penultima thule is offline
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More macabre than strange but:
Frances Larson's "Severed - A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found"
  #67  
Old 02-05-2017, 07:11 AM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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About thirty years ago, I found, as I recall. two volumes of a sort of young readers' illustrated technological history of some spacefarers in the future. Very non-fiction-like, basically a bunch of illustrations, just all made up. I don't remember the names at all.
_

Um, Robert Anton Wilson's Masks of the Illuminati is actually pretty clever. I don't think I'd have the patience for it now, but if you want to know what RAW considered a Mind Fuck, reading this book might do it for you.
  #68  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:14 AM
Ignatz Ignatz is offline
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Shelby Steele's 2008 book: A Bound Man-Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win
  #69  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:21 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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A few years ago I read Love Is Not Constantly Wondering If You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life by Anonymous.

I heard about it in this article in Slate which tells you enough about the book for you to understand why it's weird without spoiling it:

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/b...reviewed_.html
  #70  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:24 AM
Prof. Pepperwinkle Prof. Pepperwinkle is offline
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Atlas of Human Anatomy by Dr. Victor H. Frankenstein. There is (or was) a copy in the Herron School of Fine Art Library, IUPUI, Indianapolis. Lots of spectacular hand-drawn illustrations, notes in fine penmanship, and never breaks character.
  #71  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:39 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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I actually have several of the books mentioned here.
I can't remember the title but there's a book written by Phillip Jose Farmer. Basically it's about Doc Savage meeting Tarzan. You would think that a book about such an interesting subject written by such a good writer would be interesting. It reads like a fan fiction written by a teenager.

The Third Policeman by Flan O"Brien.

My grandmother had a book published in 1776 detailing how civilization was on the verge of collapse.
  #72  
Old 02-05-2017, 02:10 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Another one I thought of. The Prince of Morning Bells By Nancy Kress. It's supposed to be a typical fantasy novel, but for some reason she's replaced a lot of obscure words with sound alike words. For example a sentence like "They attacked the crenelated wall with a trebuchet." Would be turned into something like "They attacked the mentholated wall with a trebek." Kind of amusing the first time she did it, vaguely amusing the second time and downright annoying the other 100 times.
  #73  
Old 02-05-2017, 02:34 PM
E-DUB E-DUB is offline
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"The Dissertation"-by R.M.Koester

https://www.amazon.com/dissertation-...ertation+novel

A novel about a man with a unique approach to research, he interviews the dead.
  #74  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:15 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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I own a Masonic Bible.
  #75  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:47 PM
erysichthon erysichthon is online now
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When I was in high school in the early 70s, I came across a copy of The Urantia Book while browsing in a B. Dalton bookstore. It freaked me out; I had never had any exposure to alternative religions, and this seemed like a book from a parallel universe. I didn't buy it, but I told one of my friends about it, and he actually went and bought the damn thing.
  #76  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:28 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is online now
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Travel phrase books are often hilarious.

In a Greek-English phrase book, chapter "on the boat", the English sentence "Soon we will see earth." Meaning, soon we will see land.

A Portuguese phrase book: "Wake me at two o'clock, I shall need to take an aspirin."

I found one British phrasebook, telling me in the other language what time "half six" is. Luckily I knew the other language well enough to translate "half six" from British to American. Bur now I've forgotten, and can't remember if it is 5:30 or 6:30.

A reprint of an Arabic phrasebook from around 1900: "My shoes are soiled -- see that the bootblack is caned."

Some clever American once wrote an Oklahoma phrase book. Bob wore faints = barbed wire fence. Chick at all = (Would you like me to) check that oil (on your dipstick)?

And the classic from the glorious years of the Raj in India: "Summon the fire brigade, the jute mill has exploded."
  #77  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:47 PM
The Stainless Steel Rat The Stainless Steel Rat is online now
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I think the two strangest I read were back in college while browsing the stacks at Kent State.

One was called Tooth and Talon: Tales of the Australian wild / by Henry G. Lamond. Which was a group of stories about various Australian wildlife, with the climax of each being a fight to the death between two males over breeding rights. Every. Single. Story.

The other was Horse-fight and Horse-race in Norse tradition. by Svale Solheim, which was more like a Doctorate paper than a book, but if you wanted to know how the Vikings entertained themselves with their horses, well, this is the definitive work on that topic.

I don't think I've read anything stranger in the last 40+ years...and glad I haven't.
  #78  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:54 PM
E-DUB E-DUB is offline
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marque elf wrote: "I was a fan of Norman Spinrad's when I was in high school. He wrote a book called The Iron Dream. It was ostensibly a science fiction novel written by Adolph Hitler, a painter and writer living in Paris who had dabbled in radical politics in his youth. Very strange and I'm still not sure whether it was a work of genius or psychosis.

Spinrad also gave us Men In The Jungle, where the 3 protagonists go to a frontier world to foment a revolution in order to gain wealth and power. Things get weird very quickly and there are lavish descriptions of canabalism and rape in the book. Reading the book made me feel dirty, as if I had somehow been made an accomplice in the atrocities."

I have read both of those. "Iron Dream" is both a work of genius and psychosis. It comes with an almost superfluous afterword that puts the whole thing into perspective. It is, to say the least, unique.
  #79  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:58 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is online now
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The strangest book I can think of that achieved best-selling status was this one. I have heard that a movie is in some stage of the works, and if they cast anyone other than John Malkovich as Mr. Penumbra and Seth Rogen as Clay, the movie will be a disastrous failure.

https://www.amazon.com/Mr-Penumbras-...hour+bookstore

While looking up the link, I found out that the author has since published a prequel called "Ajax Penumbra 1969". I'll have to check it out.

A while back, I found a book at a rummage sale called "Clothes Make The Man" that appeared to be about Appalachian mill towns, and the introductory chapter was, as were the plates in the center of the book, but most of the text was stream-of-consciousness rambling.

https://www.amazon.com/Clothes-Make-...s+make+the+man

As a Friends of the Library volunteer, a lot of strange things come our way, and one of the strangest I've seen, simply because of the age group it was aimed at, was a book about abortion, from the pro-life Catholic perspective, aimed at lower elementary children. I couldn't imagine a child that young having the life experience to understand what it was about anyway.
  #80  
Old 02-05-2017, 11:15 PM
wendelenn wendelenn is offline
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I'm a librarian, so I love this site of weird, wacky and wonderful books that are still on some library shelves that definitely should not be there any more:

http://awfullibrarybooks.net

Last edited by wendelenn; 02-05-2017 at 11:17 PM.
  #81  
Old 02-05-2017, 11:55 PM
Penfeather Penfeather is offline
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Originally Posted by Bibliothecarius View Post
What, no mention of the Codex Seraphinianus yet?
I have a copy.
  #82  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:03 AM
Plumpudding Plumpudding is offline
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Originally Posted by furryman View Post
I actually have several of the books mentioned here.
I can't remember the title but there's a book written by Phillip Jose Farmer. Basically it's about Doc Savage meeting Tarzan. You would think that a book about such an interesting subject written by such a good writer would be interesting. It reads like a fan fiction written by a teenager.
Heh, this thread got me thinking about "Venus on the Half-Shell". I thought it was pretty strange, but even stranger was the pulp novels Simon, the protagonist, was reading.
  #83  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:28 AM
Gedd Gedd is offline
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We have quite a library at home, but nothing too weird.

We do have (I forget the title) an illustrated napkin-folding guide and The Jane Austen Handbook: A Sensible Yet Elegant Guide to Her World. It include fashion, meal plans, manners, etc. My wife likes being fancy every once in awhile.

Oh, and a Bible written in Icelandic.
  #84  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:44 AM
Andy L Andy L is online now
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I saw a copy of a Humument at a library once http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/humument - now that's a weird book.
  #85  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:08 PM
Gedd Gedd is offline
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I saw a copy of a Humument at a library once http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/humument - now that's a weird book.
Dude had a lot of time.
  #86  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:32 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is offline
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I saw a copy of a Humument at a library once http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/humument - now that's a weird book.
Thanks for posting this...I own three different editions of this work (Phillips repeatedly revised and added new and different artwork over the years) plus the app version, and now I see that a "Final" edition has just been published, which is a must-have for me.
  #87  
Old 02-06-2017, 03:48 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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The Man Who Folded Himself is a time-travel yarn with a weird wrinkle. Our hero is presented with a time machine built into a belt by a strangely familiar old man. Along the way, he finds out that every time he travels, he leaves himself in a separate reality stream. He starts to run into himself all over the place. Somehow, one of him becomes female, and he mates with her. He happens on to a place where he dies, over and over again, witnessed by several of him, and her. He figures out that the old man who gave him the belt was him. Very strange.
It starts out odd, and gets really weird. It's very funny. It's brutal, too, but more funny.
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That's by David Gerrold, who gave us (among other things) The Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles". TMWFH was an attempt to jam every time travel cliche he could think of into a single story.
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Originally Posted by iamthewalrus(:3= View Post
Sounds like he ripped both stories off from Heinlein. The time travel story appears to be a mix of By His Bootstraps and All you Zombies..., while tribbles bear an uncanny resemblance to the martian fuzzballs in The Rolling Stones.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
In his book The Trouble with Tribbles (which is about writing the script, not a novelization), Gerrold claims that he didn't have Heinlein consciously in mind while writing "Tribbles" -- he says he thought he was retelling the story of rabbits in Australia. It wasn't until later, when somebody pointed out the similarity that he realized it, and recalled reading the book and the flatcats. Some people claim that he got permission from Heinlein, but that's clearly not true. I believe that he contacted Heinlein about it at one point, and Heinlein was cool with it.

As I noted above, TWHFH was a conscious attempt to cram every time travel cliche into a single volume, so of course he referred to Heinlein's stories -- as well as everyyone else's. It's not exactly a "rip off".
I've not heard Gerrold's explanations, only the observation that several of his novels seem "inspired directly" (cribbed?) by Heinlein. Not only The Trouble With Tribbles, and The Man Who Folded Himself, but When Harlie Was One being inspired by The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress - not so much the whole plot but the AI aspects.

TMWFH is a solipsism extension of Heinlein's two stories, most explicitly with All You Zombies, where the protagonist is a time traveler who was born a hermaphrodite but fertile female who was seduced and impregnated, during delivery the organs were damaged and she was surgically transformed to be a man, who then went on to seduce himself. TMWFH takes that further, by running into alternate reality versions of himself. In each case, every major event in their lives is dictated by another version of themselves.

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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I found one British phrasebook, telling me in the other language what time "half six" is. Luckily I knew the other language well enough to translate "half six" from British to American. Bur now I've forgotten, and can't remember if it is 5:30 or 6:30.
I believe it means "half hour before 6".



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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
As a Friends of the Library volunteer, a lot of strange things come our way, and one of the strangest I've seen, simply because of the age group it was aimed at, was a book about abortion, from the pro-life Catholic perspective, aimed at lower elementary children. I couldn't imagine a child that young having the life experience to understand what it was about anyway.
It's called "pre-indoctrination" - get 'em early before they know anything by which to evaluate it. "This is the way it is," at the time when everything a child learns is "This is the way it is" from a "trusted" source.
  #88  
Old 02-06-2017, 04:00 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
I've not heard Gerrold's explanations, only the observation that several of his novels seem "inspired directly" (cribbed?) by Heinlein. Not only The Trouble With Tribbles, and The Man Who Folded Himself, but When Harlie Was One being inspired by The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress - not so much the whole plot but the AI aspects.
And of course, "A Matter for Men" is certainly inspired by Starship Troopers (not that there's anything wrong with that).
  #89  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:12 PM
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At a Saskatoon Public Library book sale, I once bought a copy of a fairly thick book that was named something like "Population Statistics of Ringed Seals (1973-1978)". It was somewhat dry reading.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:27 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is online now
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Several years ago, my brother found out that our 3rd grade teacher's master's thesis was available through inter-library loan (not sure how he found this out) and requested it. He said it was actually fairly interesting; it was a collection of case studies of boys who had benefited from being held back at the kindergarten or 1st grade level.

She got that degree in the early 1960s, and died about 20 years ago.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 02-06-2017 at 11:28 PM.
  #91  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:01 AM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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I'm surprised I didn't post in this thread the first time around. My oddest is probably Golfing for Cats, although I have an older edition with different cover.

Oh, and I have a German dictionary of American slang, but I haven't been able to find it in a while.
  #92  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:41 AM
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I picked up a used copy of Black Box, which as its name suggests is a cpllection of final communications from doomed airline crews who realize their existences are about to wink out.

The really weird thing was the bookmark that I found in the book: a boarding pass on a flight from Los Angeles to San Francisco, back in the eighties. So someone apparently considered this to be appropriate reading while flying.
  #93  
Old 02-07-2017, 04:55 AM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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My oddest is probably Golfing for Cats, although I have an older edition with different cover.
... OK, that 'different cover' certainly increases the 'strange' level. Is there actually a reason for it, or is it just random weirdness?
  #94  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:47 AM
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As a kid I came across a book in out house that was the US Census for Oregon. For 1860. Just page after page of tables. Surprisingly good sized.

Not just an odd book, but apparently no one knew how it was obtained nor why it was kept.
  #95  
Old 02-07-2017, 09:12 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Here's a genuinely weird book I found in the bookstore at the American Museum of Natural History many years ago:

The Snouters: Form and Life of the Rhinogrades. It's a translation from the German original Bau und Leben der Rhinogradentia by Gerolf Steiner, writing under the pseudonym Harald Stumke.

The book is an elaborate parody of Darwinian evolution, only instead of finding a Galapagos full of adapted finches, the fictional author finds an island group populated by mouse-like creatures that have adapted to fill ecological niches in truly bizarre ways, many of them involving their noses 9hence the title)

http://speculativeevolution.wikia.co...he_Rhinogrades

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinogradentia


Maybe calling it a "parody" isn't accurate -- the author was a zoologist fully familiar with (and presumably supportive of) the Theory of Natural Selection, but he carries this to wonderfully absurd extremes. The book is heavily illustrated, so you are treated to images of the Snouters that mimic plants, or that hop on their noses, or that use nasal mucus to ensnare their prey. Several of the drawings appear to be caricatures of people, presumably colleagues. As the Wikipedia article shows, people have gone out of their way to fabricate taxidermic models of some of them. This is light years beyond "jackalopes" as taxidermy hoaxes.
  #96  
Old 02-07-2017, 10:01 AM
Steve MB Steve MB is offline
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I once stumbled across a particularly weird bit of crank literature called Somebody Else Is On The Moon, which purported to prove that aliens have been building giant devices and cities on the moon, that the astronauts discovered this, and that the gummint is covering it up. The key "evidence" was a batch of photos where some perfectly ordinary feature of the lunar landscape is circled and labelled as some sort of alien artifact.
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  #97  
Old 02-07-2017, 10:12 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve MB View Post
I once stumbled across a particularly weird bit of crank literature called Somebody Else Is On The Moon, which purported to prove that aliens have been building giant devices and cities on the moon, that the astronauts discovered this, and that the gummint is covering it up. The key "evidence" was a batch of photos where some perfectly ordinary feature of the lunar landscape is circled and labelled as some sort of alien artifact.
I've seen that book. It's not just a LOne Nut -- there were several people drumming that particular drum, from at least the 1950s on. You can read about some of the others in Frank Edwards' books (Stranger than Science, [I[Strange World[/I], Strangest of All...) Edwards was something of a nut, himself.

Anyway, at first the "inhabited Moon" nuts had to rely on observations and telescopic photographs. Later they had NASA images from the lunar orbiters and such.

If I recall correctly, the book you're citing uses NASA pictures and claims to make out "X-drones", constructions that look sorta like chromosomes. They're big sloppy crossed tubes that he thinks are (were) excavating lunar soil for some nefarious purpose.


The thing is, there was a time when this didn't seem -- pardon me -- looney. Look at this headline from The New York Times (!!!) from 1911:

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...6E9C946096D6CF

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_N...s_in_Two_Years

Last edited by CalMeacham; 02-07-2017 at 10:15 AM.
  #98  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:17 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve MB View Post
I once stumbled across a particularly weird bit of crank literature called Somebody Else Is On The Moon, which purported to prove that aliens have been building giant devices and cities on the moon, that the astronauts discovered this, and that the gummint is covering it up. The key "evidence" was a batch of photos where some perfectly ordinary feature of the lunar landscape is circled and labelled as some sort of alien artifact.
I've actually read that book! It was as wacky as it sounds.

I also recently (as in within the past 2 weeks) watched a "documentary" about the same topic.
  #99  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:23 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robot Arm View Post
I'm surprised I didn't post in this thread the first time around. My oddest is probably Golfing for Cats, although I have an older edition with different cover.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamino Neko View Post
... OK, that 'different cover' certainly increases the 'strange' level. Is there actually a reason for it, or is it just random weirdness?
In the foreword, the author explains, facetiously, I think, that the three best-selling topics for books are golf, cats and
SPOILER:
Nazi Germany
, and that the cover was designed to tap into that popularity for increased sales. The book itself has nothing to do with any of them; it's just a collection of columns written by Alan Coren.

Alan Coren, incidentally, was the father of Victoria Coren Mitchell, who might be familiar to folks around here for her appearances on QI and other British TV shows.
  #100  
Old 02-07-2017, 03:05 PM
by-tor by-tor is offline
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As a teenager interested in the occult, I found a book supposedly translated from a book written by an Arab person who was relaying the teachings of Simon Magus' son (or maybe grandson).

It started with a stern warning that only the strongest willed person could control the demons that the following spells would unleash and even then, disaster was almost inevitable.

Then the rest of the book were a series of numbers arranged in square patterns that you were supposed to carve on plates of specific precious metals. I think jewels were somehow involved as well.

Each "numbers square" was for a different spell, such as flying or gaining wealth and they all involved summoning demons to bend to the summoner's will.

There were other notes on the rituals to perform for each spell.

Whoever created the book would have made a cool DM.
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