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  #101  
Old 02-07-2017, 03:20 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Another one I thought of. A series of soft core pornography books masquerading as western. The weird thing about it was that the author used the names of real historical people. I nearly laughed myself silly when he describes Calamity Jane and Belle Starr as "beautiful and sexy."

Last edited by furryman; 02-07-2017 at 03:21 PM.
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  #102  
Old 02-07-2017, 04:15 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
And of course, "A Matter for Men" is certainly inspired by Starship Troopers (not that there's anything wrong with that).
I would dispute that. That is to say, not any more than any other alien invasion story. The aliens in AMFM is the alien ecology slowing overcoming the ecology on Earth, disrupting society and driving the government into collapse. The main aliens themselves, while being discribed as looking a bit like giant caterpillers, do not really have any comparison to the aliens in ST beyond the vaguely similar concept of being "giant bugs". The governmental systems between the novels are completely different. Powered armor plays no role in AMFM, while it is a key component of ST. And the tone of the books is very different. Heinlein's character is a hero finding himself. Gerrold's is something more of an anti-hero slowing going insane.

I suppose one could argue A Rage for Revenge has some similarity in the study session sections, but it's not a huge similarity.

Whereas The Trouble With Tribbles has large elements of similarity to the flatcats of The Rolling Stones, The Man Who Folded Himself explores (and expands) the same concepts expressed in By His Bootstraps and All You Zombies, and When H.A.R.L.I.E. Was One is a sentient computer and his relationship with a human as he learns about the world. That's probably the thinnest parallel of the three.

Gerrold was certainly inspired by Heinlein, and has a similar writing style. I would say in all three incidents I mentioned, he adds some creative element of his own to the story, so it's not a direct rip-off.
  #103  
Old 02-07-2017, 05:16 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by by-tor View Post
As a teenager interested in the occult, I found a book supposedly translated from a book written by an Arab person who was relaying the teachings of Simon Magus' son (or maybe grandson).

It started with a stern warning that only the strongest willed person could control the demons that the following spells would unleash and even then, disaster was almost inevitable.

Then the rest of the book were a series of numbers arranged in square patterns that you were supposed to carve on plates of specific precious metals. I think jewels were somehow involved as well.

Each "numbers square" was for a different spell, such as flying or gaining wealth and they all involved summoning demons to bend to the summoner's will.

There were other notes on the rituals to perform for each spell.

Whoever created the book would have made a cool DM.
What do you mean by DM? That could mean any of thousands of
things.

This book was a best-seller in the late 1980s.

https://www.amazon.com/Elvis-Alive-B...is+elvis+alive
  #104  
Old 02-07-2017, 06:50 PM
by-tor by-tor is offline
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DM = Dungeon Master for D&D.
  #105  
Old 02-07-2017, 07:42 PM
bibliophage bibliophage is offline
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I've forgotten the title and author, but I once tried to read a book purporting to be a breakthrough in philosophy. It was illustrated with pictures of kitchen gadgets hung on a pegboard which were somehow supposed to illustrate universal truths of a new system of logic or some such thing. I honestly believe that it was written by someone in the manic stage of bipolar disorder. The strangest thing was that it wasn't self-published and I found it in the philosophy section of an otherwise respectable college library.

They other odd one was a screed about modern physics being a hoax perpetrated by Einstein. That one was self-published so I wasn't too surprised it existed. I was more disappointed that my local public library would devote precious self space to it.
  #106  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:05 PM
P-man P-man is offline
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Who Needs Donuts, by Mark Alan Stamaty is pretty crazy for a kids' book. "Who needs donuts when you've got love?"
  #107  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:06 PM
hogarth hogarth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by furryman View Post
Another one I thought of. A series of soft core pornography books masquerading as western. The weird thing about it was that the author used the names of real historical people. I nearly laughed myself silly when he describes Calamity Jane and Belle Starr as "beautiful and sexy."
Maybe you're thinking of the Slocum series by "Jake Logan". Although I remember another soft-core western series with a Japanese guy and a red-headed woman, but the name escapes me.
  #108  
Old 02-08-2017, 12:20 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by bibliophage View Post
They other odd one was a screed about modern physics being a hoax perpetrated by Einstein. That one was self-published so I wasn't too surprised it existed. I was more disappointed that my local public library would devote precious self space to it.
The author (or his/her mother ) may have donated that book to the library, who felt obligated to keep it in the stacks because s/he is local.
  #109  
Old 02-08-2017, 06:41 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dijon Warlock View Post
tiltypig beat me to "Why Cats Paint." I've never heard of "Why Paint Cats," though. I could never decide whether WCP was a send-up, or not. I've seen elephants paint (and they weren't just slopping paint at random, they were painting recognisable pictures), so you never know.
Snopes says mostly no; they've been trained to replicate the same image over and over.

Of course, training a cat to do the same thing would be an order of magnitude more difficult.

Edit: Dammned zombie threads.

Last edited by DesertDog; 02-08-2017 at 06:42 AM.
  #110  
Old 02-08-2017, 06:59 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Here's a genuinely weird book I found in the bookstore at the American Museum of Natural History many years ago:

The Snouters: Form and Life of the Rhinogrades. It's a translation from the German original Bau und Leben der Rhinogradentia by Gerolf Steiner, writing under the pseudonym Harald Stumke.
<snip>
I wore a Snouters live! button for a few months in high school. I was am such a nerd
  #111  
Old 02-09-2017, 07:05 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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Originally Posted by Orual View Post
I once ran across a purported copy of the Necronomicon in a used bookstore.

It was a cheaply bound paperback with no publishing information. Very weird.
I remember I was at a New York Science Fiction convention (Lunacon) back in the 1970s -- Robert Bloch was there (author of a variety of horror stories and fantasy and such). He was on a panel talking about the Cthulhu Mythos. Someone on the panel mentioned that they owned a bookstore and people kept calling him up asking if he had the Necronomicon in stock. So (if I remember correctly) he (or possibly Robert Bloch) claimed to have written one -- too many years ago for me to remember that panel accurately. Later, I found a paperback with that title. It was done partly as a joke on those people who thought the book was real. Well, it became real. At the convention, I remember looking for the book in the dealers room and (as you say) it wasn't signed, but I did find a paperback 'translation' of it. I remember it contained all of these incantations and rituals for summoning various entities.

There's some info at Wikipedia on a variety of books with that name, but the ACTUAL author isn't listed there (Remember that the fictional book was written by "the mad arab Abdul Alhazred". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necron...d_translations
  #112  
Old 02-09-2017, 07:25 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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When I was living in Ohio, a friend and I had heard about some kind of survivalist fair, and we attended as a kind of joke (we were working on the Y2K project at our company, and were used to all of the doom and calamity talk that was going around and used to joke about it with each other). It stopped being funny when I saw all of the racist and anti-semitic literature that was being sold there -- things like "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion", and so on. In retrospect, it doesn't seem so strange, but back then it was kind of a shock. I felt physically ill, and I had to leave.

There is a science fiction novel -- on the cover the title is "The Iron Dream" by Norman Spinrad. But if you open it up to the title page, it says "Lord of the Swastika" by Adolph Hitler. The book contains a biography of Hitler, which states that he emigrated to Greenwich Village in NYC, and eventually did artwork for science fiction magazines, etc. According to the Biography, he won a posthumous Hugo award for "Lord of the Swastika" in 1955 (the author Adolph Hitler died in 1953).

Obviously, Norman Spinrad is the actual author -- it was a commentary on all of the hidden undertones of racism and anti-semitism in science fiction and fantasy at the time (in "Lord of the Swastika", the holocaust is disguised as a war on evil mutants).
  #113  
Old 02-09-2017, 07:32 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Haldurson, the Spinrad novel was previously mentioned in posts #62 and #78.
  #114  
Old 02-09-2017, 10:14 AM
Brodi Brodi is offline
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Time's Arrow by Martin Amis is a major mind screw.

A short summary: You are shown a man's life in REVERSE!

The "rewinding" gimmick is at times tedious, but once you figure out who "Uncle Pepi" is, you'll be in a whole dimension of mind screw with a heaping of distubing.

Hint:
SPOILER:
He is Josef Mengele and the MC was a Nazi doctor.
  #115  
Old 02-09-2017, 10:17 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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I once ran across a useful little book that I think is now out of print. It's the US Army Field Manual FM 21-76, "Survival, Evasion and Escape". It's a 1969 publication,, later editions have been reduced to just "Survival", which by itself is a useful guide for the civilian back country hiker or camper. But the earlier extended versions included lengthy and detailed chapters on how to avoid capture behind enemy lines and how to escape from a POW camp, or to comport yourself within one.

Last edited by jtur88; 02-09-2017 at 10:19 AM.
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