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  #1  
Old 01-13-2006, 10:36 AM
freckafree freckafree is offline
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Manhattan sandwiches

In my neck of the woods (central-ish Ohio), there is a sandwich, found primarily in Amish- or country-style restaurants, known as a Manhattan. I had never encountered this before moving here. A Manhattan is similar to a hot roast beef sandwich (i.e., with gravy and mashed potatoes), only it is open-faced and generally can be ordered in turkey and roast pork varieties in addition to roast beef.

I have been entirely unsuccessful in finding out WHY theses sandwiches are called Manhattans. It does appear to be a midwestern thing. In searching for the answer, I found references to Manhattan sandwiches on a hospital cafeteria menu in Iowa (a low-fat Manhattan, no doubt -- NOT!) and a school lunch menu in western Ohio, near the Indiana border.

Can anyone enlighten me as to the origin of the Manhattan sandwich?

Freckafree
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  #2  
Old 01-13-2006, 11:08 AM
Eonwe Eonwe is offline
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No idea. All I can add is that living in New England I've never heard of a Manhattan sandwich.
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  #3  
Old 01-13-2006, 11:11 AM
samclem samclem is offline
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I live in Akron, and have eaten in Amish/Mennonite restaurants in this general area of Northern Ohio, and had open-faced pork/beef/turkey sandwiches as you described. Never saw any of them called "Manhattan Sandwich."

I found in a newspaper database an article from 1945 in Piqua, Ohio which described a new restaurant opening(not Amish or Mennonite) which served
Quote:
...sandwiches and short orders, including hot beef and pork, and the favorite Manhattan sandwich, accompanied by French fries and gravy.
Amazingly, the database which I used has tons of Midwestern papers going back hundreds of years. but I only got two hits for this, both in the Piqua paper.

I know that doesn't help you with an answer. I"ll keep looking. All I can deduce from my results is that it wasn't called that in many places.
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  #4  
Old 01-13-2006, 11:18 AM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is offline
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WAG: perhaps the name is taken from another type of sandwich?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subway%27s_B.M.T.
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  #5  
Old 01-13-2006, 11:22 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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Well, here's a turkey Manhattan.
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  #6  
Old 01-13-2006, 12:05 PM
freckafree freckafree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris
WAG: perhaps the name is taken from another type of sandwich?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subway%27s_B.M.T.

Waaah! The article was missing when I went there. What did it say?!???

Freckafree

NB to Samclem -- I'm in Wooster, which just goes to show you what a difference of 30 miles to the west can make.
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  #7  
Old 01-13-2006, 12:26 PM
yabob yabob is online now
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A Manhattan sandwich? How do you keep the bourbon from making the bread all soggy?
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  #8  
Old 01-13-2006, 01:01 PM
ratatoskK ratatoskK is online now
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I've lived in Manhattan and have never heard of a "Manhattan sandwich."
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  #9  
Old 01-13-2006, 02:08 PM
DooWahDiddy DooWahDiddy is offline
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This website describes the Manhattan Sandwich as:

"Sliced roast beef, cream cheese, honey mustard, lettuce, tomato, onion & cucumber on grilled Focaccia bread. A real East Coast original!"

My WAG as to why it's called a Manhattan Sandwich is that seems like something that would be served at Katz's Deli, or some other well-known kosher establishment, mostly likely in New York City. When it first came out, Manhattan was probably the only place you could get one.
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  #10  
Old 01-13-2006, 02:21 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freckafree
Waaah! The article was missing when I went there. What did it say?.
Strange, I don't know what happened there.

Click on the last link here, It'll take you to the page.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMT
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  #11  
Old 01-13-2006, 02:51 PM
freckafree freckafree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris
Strange, I don't know what happened there.

Click on the last link here, It'll take you to the page.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMT
Read it! Thanks!
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  #12  
Old 01-13-2006, 03:22 PM
cbarnes cbarnes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DooWahDiddy
This website describes the Manhattan Sandwich as:

"Sliced roast beef, cream cheese, honey mustard, lettuce, tomato, onion & cucumber on grilled Focaccia bread. A real East Coast original!"

My WAG as to why it's called a Manhattan Sandwich is that seems like something that would be served at Katz's Deli, or some other well-known kosher establishment, mostly likely in New York City. When it first came out, Manhattan was probably the only place you could get one.
You wouldn't find this in a Kosher establishment. Because, quite simply, it's not Kosher.

If I had to guess, somebody got the idea that this is the type of sandwich you would find in a deli and connected good delis with Manhattan.
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  #13  
Old 01-13-2006, 03:30 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DooWahDiddy
This website describes the Manhattan Sandwich as:

"Sliced roast beef, cream cheese, honey mustard, lettuce, tomato, onion & cucumber on grilled Focaccia bread. A real East Coast original!"

My WAG as to why it's called a Manhattan Sandwich is that seems like something that would be served at Katz's Deli, or some other well-known kosher establishment, mostly likely in New York City. When it first came out, Manhattan was probably the only place you could get one.
The problem is, that is a different sandwich than the one freckafree is talking about. There were "Manhattan" sandwiches as far back as 1905 in NYC. But they were more like the kind of sandwich you're describing--meat/and/or chese on bread. We're looking more for the open-faced hot pork/turkey/beef sandwich with gravy and mashed potatoes.
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  #14  
Old 01-13-2006, 04:38 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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A Manhattan sandwich, around here, has been (since I was a kid) sliced meat (usually roast beef) on a couple slices of white bread, slathered in matching gravy. I always figured it was because it tasted like a man's hat. No, seriously, it's not bad, but whole wheat bread would be better.
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  #15  
Old 01-13-2006, 05:47 PM
Pork Rind Pork Rind is offline
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I have a vague recollection of an item called a Turkey Manhattan that made a regular appearance on my lunch tray in grade school*. I don't remember much more a slice of processed turkey, gravy, and mashed potatoes in some configuration.


*Central Indiana, late 70s to maybe early 80s.
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  #16  
Old 01-13-2006, 05:47 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freckafree
A Manhattan is similar to a hot roast beef sandwich (i.e., with gravy and mashed potatoes), only it is open-faced and generally can be ordered in turkey and roast pork varieties in addition to roast beef.
Further west, out here in Minnesota, that sandwich is called a "Beef Commercial". Said to be a favorite of people in commerce, like local business people, traveling salesmen, etc. Also comes as 'Turkey Commercial' and (less common) "Pork Commercial".

You can see a mention of them here, an online menu from a small restaurant in western Minnesota: http://www.gomarshall.net/pageads/mi...afe%20menu.htm


P.S. To a restaurant, these are common as good ways to use up the leftover roast beef from the previous day. Slice it, add bread & mashed potatoes, cover it with the leftover gravy, and you have a tasty sandwich.

A key to successful restaurants is not wasting things -- selling their leftovers to customers the next day.
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  #17  
Old 01-13-2006, 05:55 PM
Pork Rind Pork Rind is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pork Rind
I have a vague recollection of an item called a Turkey Manhattan that made a regular appearance on my lunch tray in grade school*. I don't remember much more a slice of processed turkey, gravy, and mashed potatoes in some configuration.


*Central Indiana, late 70s to maybe early 80s.

... and to follow up on my own post, a quick Google of "turkey manhattan" brings up several links in the first couple of pages to school lunch menus indicating that Indiana schools are still dishing it up.
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  #18  
Old 01-13-2006, 06:00 PM
Hunter Hawk Hunter Hawk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DooWahDiddy
This website describes the Manhattan Sandwich as:

"Sliced roast beef, cream cheese, honey mustard, lettuce, tomato, onion & cucumber on grilled Focaccia bread. A real East Coast original!"
Of course, the web page also starts off with the phrase "Like nothing you've ever had." Speaking as an East Coast native, I can certainly agree with that.
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  #19  
Old 01-13-2006, 06:54 PM
Omniscient Omniscient is offline
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Round here that type of sandwish is pretty common, but it's always called a open-faced (insert meat type) sandwich. The term Manhattan is one which is new to me. Nevertheless I'm craving one now.
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  #20  
Old 01-13-2006, 07:48 PM
freckafree freckafree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pork Rind
... and to follow up on my own post, a quick Google of "turkey manhattan"
After reading Pork Rind's post, I Googled "turkey manhattan," too, and was heartily amused by one of the hits, a review of Yoder's Restaurant in Sarasota, FL.

Without getting my ass out of the chair and going to look, I'm guessing there are more Yoders in the Wooster, OH phone book than Smiths and Joneses.

Around here, those who earn money by driving vans to transport Amish folks to job sites, shopping centers, etc. are known as "Yoder Toters."

But I digress...
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  #21  
Old 01-13-2006, 08:31 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freckafree
Waaah! The article was missing when I went there.
In case anyone cares, the problem is that the Wikipeida link has a period at the very end (after the last T) and the SDMB linkification software didn't include it in the clickable link it made. While this is the right thing to do 99.999% of the time, it broke the link this time around.

Doing a link manually with url tags works.
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  #22  
Old 01-13-2006, 08:32 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freckafree
Around here, those who earn money by driving vans to transport Amish folks to job sites, shopping centers, etc. are known as "Yoder Toters."
.
And the vans are.................wait for it..................................










Toy-Yoders
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