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Old 01-14-2006, 08:08 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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What is the difference between a Kosher dill and a regular dill pickle?

I like a good dill pickle, tart and salty, with a high pucker factor. But I don't care for Kosher dill pickles, and avoid them if given a choice. What causes Kosher dills to taste different from regular dill pickles, sometimes labeled "old fashioned" or "country" dills?
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  #2  
Old 01-14-2006, 11:27 PM
Walloon Walloon is offline
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Laura Brandt writes, "Kosher dills have a more robust flavor than regular dill pickles due to the addition of garlic and other spices to the brine."
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Old 01-14-2006, 11:48 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Aren't some pickles cured in vinegar? Kosher, at least, are brine.
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Old 01-14-2006, 11:49 PM
DanBlather DanBlather is offline
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Kosher dills have a little bit of the end cut off. ;j
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Old 01-15-2006, 01:55 AM
Amazon Floozy Goddess Amazon Floozy Goddess is offline
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Regular dills, kosher dills, I love 'em all. Mmm mmm mmm. Yeah. Now I want a pickle. But I don't have any! Damn. Damnity damn damn!
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Old 01-15-2006, 08:22 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I believe a kosher "dill" is a misnomer. I've never had a kosher pickle that had dill in it. I think that salt and garlic are the main seasonings of a kosher pickle.

Not that anyone asked for it, but it's extremely easy to make "half-done kosher" pickles at home:

Make a brine of 1/2 cup of salt to three cups of water. Crush four or five cloves of garlic and toss them in, as well as several peppercorns and a bay leaf. Slice four pickling cucumbers lengthwise in half. Add them to the brine. Refrigerate this for a couple of days.

This makes luscious, crispy deli-style koshers to have with your tuna sandwich or cheese and cracker lunch.
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  #7  
Old 01-15-2006, 08:52 AM
BoringDad BoringDad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fear Itself
I like a good dill pickle, tart and salty, with a high pucker factor. But I don't care for Kosher dill pickles, and avoid them if given a choice. What causes Kosher dills to taste different from regular dill pickles, sometimes labeled "old fashioned" or "country" dills?
Kosher pickles don't have bacon and cheese covering them.

It's either that or they lack Polysorbates, derived from animal fat according to The Master.
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  #8  
Old 01-15-2006, 09:02 AM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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It might be more accurate to say that they are koshered pickles: koshering is a process where things are treated with kosher (large crystal) salt.

Dill pickles are primarilly preserved through high amounts of vinegar. While kosher(ed) dills may have a bit of vinegar for taste, they rely on thir higher salt for preservation.

Compare salt/vinegar ratios in these recipes for dill pickles and kosher dill pickles.
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Old 01-15-2006, 09:04 AM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot
Compare salt/vinegar ratios in these recipes for dill pickles and kosher dill pickles.
(Both of which are "kosher", by the way, as they are all vegetable products.)
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  #10  
Old 01-15-2006, 11:43 AM
Wile E Wile E is offline
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I always thought it was the garlic, I sometimes hear them referred to as Garlic Dills.

Can anyone explain why the pickled you get from the deli or some restaurants served with your sandwich are so much better than anything you can buy in the store?
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  #11  
Old 01-15-2006, 11:47 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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Might have something to do with the processing needed to meet Federal regs on canned foods. On the other hand, it might just be tha atmosphere of the deli that makes them taste so good.
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  #12  
Old 01-15-2006, 01:19 PM
Walloon Walloon is offline
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The ones you get in a jar are usually boiled as part of the canning process. Vlasic brand, available in the refrigerator case, prides itself on not being boiled, and so better tasting, like a deli pickle.
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