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  #1  
Old 02-18-2006, 03:40 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Wallace & Gromit: What does "Chuck" mean?

In the short film A Close Shave, Wendolyn calls Wallace 'Chuck', so I thought that was his given name. But in the feature length Curse Of The Were-Rabbit Wallace calls Gromit by the name 'Chuck' in one scene. Is it a term of endearment? Or did I mis-hear?
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  #2  
Old 02-18-2006, 03:42 PM
DarrenS DarrenS is offline
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Yes, it's a term of endearment used in the north of England, roughly equivalent to the American "buddy", but without the sarcastic overtones. ("Move your car, buddy!")
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  #3  
Old 02-18-2006, 04:05 PM
Pjen Pjen is offline
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Often Chooky-egg, Chook etc- from Chicken/Chick.

A contestant on Big Brother a couple of years ago who came from the North East used the full word Chicken about her 'friend' in the house.
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  #4  
Old 02-18-2006, 04:30 PM
Zabali_Clawbane Zabali_Clawbane is offline
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I thought she called him "duck"? In Curse of the Were-Rabbit the love interest calls people duck/ducks doesn't she? (Or, am I brain farting and mis-remembering?)
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  #5  
Old 02-18-2006, 04:56 PM
Savannah Savannah is offline
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Oh, weird. I just watched that. I mean, ten minutes ago. (Got the "Crackling Collection" on DVD, and I just watched the three shorts so we can lend the DVDs out to a friend.)

Um. That's all I have to say. Although I'm going to call my husband "chuck" from now on.

My mother used to call me duck, or ducks, as a term of endearment.
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  #6  
Old 02-18-2006, 05:06 PM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zabali_Clawbane
I thought she called him "duck"? In Curse of the Were-Rabbit the love interest calls people duck/ducks doesn't she? (Or, am I brain farting and mis-remembering?)
"Duck" is also appropriate. Note to Americans: "chuck" and "duck" should rhyme with "took", not "puck". And Savannah, that should be "cracking", not "crackling": "cracking" means great, wonderful, fantastic. By 'eck.
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  #7  
Old 02-18-2006, 05:11 PM
GorillaMan GorillaMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Case Sensitive
"chuck" and "duck" should rhyme with "took", not "puck"
Ignore this northern propaganda. (I have a Yorkshire friend who emigrated, and has taken three years to learn how to pronounce 'bucks' without sounding like a tourist)
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  #8  
Old 02-18-2006, 05:23 PM
Martha Medea Martha Medea is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pjen
A contestant on Big Brother a couple of years ago who came from the North East used the full word Chicken about her 'friend' in the house.

Often Chooky-egg, Chook etc- from Chicken/Chick.
Calling people 'chuck' is one of Cilla Black's trademarks, IIRC. Isn't it more of a northwestern than a northeastern thing?
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  #9  
Old 02-18-2006, 05:27 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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It's also the reason why the nickname "Chuck" is used for "Charles." Essentially, "chuck" meant "dear one" (it's a reference to the gesture of "chucking under the chin": a gesture made to one you love). It was used originally for any loved one, but attached itself to the name "Charles"; I'd guess because they start with the same sound.

One who knows.
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  #10  
Old 02-18-2006, 05:32 PM
Savannah Savannah is offline
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Cracking Collection it is, Chuck!
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  #11  
Old 02-18-2006, 06:20 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Thanks for the input everyone.

With regard to "Buddy" I have to point out that it doesn't carry sarcastic overtones unless it's obviously enunciated that way. It can also be a term of endearment. I've heard fathers calling their new baby sons "buddy".
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  #12  
Old 02-18-2006, 06:25 PM
mobo85 mobo85 is offline
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This term is also used in The Wrong Trousers. Wallace gives a birthday present to Gromit and says, "Happy birthday, chuck!"
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  #13  
Old 02-18-2006, 07:10 PM
Richard Pearse Richard Pearse is offline
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I'd always thought it was "chook" as in "chicken."
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  #14  
Old 02-18-2006, 07:17 PM
Crusoe Crusoe is offline
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"Chook" as in "chicken" is more Australian than British.
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  #15  
Old 02-18-2006, 09:40 PM
audiobottle audiobottle is offline
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Chook brings to mind the chook cannon mod from Doom II. Or maybe it was Doom. Whichever, I remember haivng a great time coming up with replacement sounds for the guns and baddies in that game with my sister's old boyfriend.

mmmmm BOOGA BOOGA BOOGA!
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  #16  
Old 02-18-2006, 10:38 PM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Savannah
Cracking Collection it is, Chuck!
Grand, pet. 'Ave a lard butty.
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  #17  
Old 02-19-2006, 12:17 AM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Case Sensitive
that should be "cracking", not "crackling": "cracking" means great, wonderful, fantastic.
I happend to be in Peru with some Brits. One of them refered to Machu Pichu as some "cracking crumblies". That has been a term that I have used ever since.
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  #18  
Old 02-19-2006, 07:53 AM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adam yax
I happend to be in Peru with some Brits. One of them refered to Machu Pichu as some "cracking crumblies". That has been a term that I have used ever since.
Is British slang really better than American, or does it just sound that way to us Yanks?
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  #19  
Old 02-19-2006, 08:46 AM
Rayne Man Rayne Man is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
Ignore this northern propaganda. (I have a Yorkshire friend who emigrated, and has taken three years to learn how to pronounce 'bucks' without sounding like a tourist)
I agree . Here in the East Midlands duck (the favourite term of endearment) rhymes with puck
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  #20  
Old 02-19-2006, 03:22 PM
ninevah ninevah is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee
Is British slang really better than American, or does it just sound that way to us Yanks?
I think so. I mean, do the Yanks have anything as brilliant as rhyming slang?
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  #21  
Old 02-19-2006, 04:11 PM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee
Is British slang really better than American, or does it just sound that way to us Yanks?
British swearing is definitely way ahead.
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  #22  
Old 02-19-2006, 05:21 PM
Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
Ignore this northern propaganda. (I have a Yorkshire friend who emigrated, and has taken three years to learn how to pronounce 'bucks' without sounding like a tourist)
Oi!

Correct pronunciation Southerner pronunciation

Buzz Bus
Curt ins Curtains
Purp ul Purple
Bath Barth
Look Luck
Am Ham
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  #23  
Old 02-19-2006, 06:38 PM
GorillaMan GorillaMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Mulligan
Oi!
Code:
'Correct' pronunciation     Southerner pronunciation  Suffolk pronunciation

Buzz                               Bus                             Bahs
Curt ins                          Curtains                       Cur'ns
Purp ul                           Purple                         Dark red
Bath                               Barth                          Pond
Look                               Luck                           Lark
Am                                 Ham                            WTF?
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  #24  
Old 02-20-2006, 03:07 PM
rjung rjung is offline
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As a W&G geek, I'll point out that Wallace calls Gromit "Chuck" at the start of The Wrong Trousers, as he's giving Gromit his birthday present.

And I'm still pissed that the US release of Curse of the Were-Rabbit is a one-disc release, missing the additional extras on the two-disc UK release -- and all of the "Cracking Contraptions" shorts!
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  #25  
Old 02-20-2006, 03:32 PM
Loach Loach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spectre of Pithecanthropus
Thanks for the input everyone.

With regard to "Buddy" I have to point out that it doesn't carry sarcastic overtones unless it's obviously enunciated that way. It can also be a term of endearment. I've heard fathers calling their new baby sons "buddy".
Isn't so much sarcastic as archaic. It was in fashion during WW I and after. Everybody was your buddy. No one called my uncle by his real name he was always Buddy. Still used commonly in the military. And on AOL.
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  #26  
Old 02-20-2006, 03:43 PM
Loach Loach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjung
As a W&G geek, I'll point out that Wallace calls Gromit "Chuck" at the start of The Wrong Trousers, as he's giving Gromit his birthday present.

And I'm still pissed that the US release of Curse of the Were-Rabbit is a one-disc release, missing the additional extras on the two-disc UK release -- and all of the "Cracking Contraptions" shorts!

Are these new shorts? If not they are on the disk with the three long shorts, Wrong Trousers etc. Maybe it would be redundant to release them again.
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  #27  
Old 02-20-2006, 03:56 PM
rjung rjung is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loach
Are these new shorts? If not they are on the disk with the three long shorts, Wrong Trousers etc. Maybe it would be redundant to release them again.
Unfortunately for me, I got an earlier release of the three W&G films that doesn't have the "Cracking Contraptions" shorts. So either I go without, or I have to re-buy the films once more just to get the extras.
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