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Old 04-20-2006, 04:20 PM
Shirley Ujest is offline
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Recommend me some children's classics for summer out loud reading.


My two are 8 and 6, m and f.

We've done Harry Potter 1-3. ( I think the remaining books are too plot complicated for them at this age.)

I am hoping to read one classic book ( say Peter Pan) a week, with an hour or two in the morning and again at night time before bed.

I have never read any of the Chronicles of Narnia ( I did see the movie and liked it.) how important is it to start with book one?

Also, what about Redwall (which doesn't strike me as a one week read at all.) too complicated?
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Old 04-20-2006, 04:22 PM
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I will make a list of the kids chapter books I have on hand later to give you all an idea of what I have and what *ahem* I like.


(Actually, I'd like something along the lines of Harry Potter. I hated Eoin Colfer's books because I hated the hero/anti hero immensely.)
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Old 04-20-2006, 04:29 PM
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I've heard good things about the "Inheritance" Trilogy, starting with Eragon
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Old 04-20-2006, 04:43 PM
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I don't know if this is in the age range you're looking for, but I remember in the fifth grade, our teacher read us The Yearling by Marjorie Rawlings as a "rainy day" book (that is, when rain kept us from going out for recess). I remember not just me, but the rest of the class too, looking forward to rainy days that year for that very reason. Not many books can keep a class of fifth graders spellbound.
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Old 04-20-2006, 04:43 PM
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I loved listening to my mother reading The Wind in the Willows. To this day, when I reread the book, I still hear my mother's voice.
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Old 04-20-2006, 04:46 PM
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Sorry for the double post, but I just thought of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, especially since you specified children's classics. A wonderful book for a 6 and 8 year old, and different enough from the movie to make it new to them.
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Old 04-20-2006, 04:56 PM
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The Redwall books are longish but they aren't very sophisticated plotwise. I think your kids would have no trouble following the story.

I'd also highly recommend the following:
"The Hounds of the Morrigan" by Pat O'Shea
"Mrs. Frisbee and the Rats of NIMH" by Robert C. O'Brien
"The Bromeliad Trilogy" by Terry Pratchett (now bound as a single volume but formerly three books called "Truckers" "Diggers" and "Wings" )
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:05 PM
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My parents read 'The Hobbit' by Tolkien to me when I was a kid.
Now I read it to nephews or children of my friends.

Whichever book you choose, remember to explain the big words and use loads of cheesy sound effects.
In 'The Hobbit', all doors creak. The wind whistles through the trees.
All dwarves have an English West Country accent (think rural). Gandalf is educated and posh, but goblins are not.
My best moment was when I sang one of the songs to a shy girl. She asked to hear it again. Then she asked to sing with me. Her parents told me she had never sung 'in public' before!
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:10 PM
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These are all Classics According to Delphica.

The Great Brain, John D. Fitzgerald
Perfect for boys.

The Jungle Book, Kipling
I think this is actually a classic, too.

The Treasure Seekers, Five Children and It, etc etc E. Nesbit
These are a bit twee, but still enjoyable. She's got a little wicked streak, too.

The Lemonade Trick and sequels, by Scott Corbett
Short magic chapter books, I think these are laugh out loud funny (keeping in mind that i have the sense of humor of an 11 year old boy). Most are out of print though, so it's a library thing.

Stuart Little, E.B. White
People seem to love this, although the whole giving birth to a mouse thing kind of freaks me out personally.

Dr. Dolittle and the five million sequels that came after, by Hugh Lofting
Not a good choice if you are creeped out by talking animals, but otherwise very good.

Lizard Music, Daniel Pinkwater
Love!

Cricket in Times Square, George Seldon
I think I might go home and read this now that I'm thinking about it. It's a cricket! He lives in Times Square! What's not to like?

Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Ingalls Wilder
The first four or so are entirely age appropriate, after that they get a little more complicated so you could see what you think if the kids like them enough to get to that point.

For Narnia, I think it would be fine to start with the Lion, the Witch etc etc.
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:12 PM
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Out loud reading?

Fox in Socks, of course.
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:23 PM
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Most of these have already been mentioned:

The Chronicles of Narnia --- I say definitely start with The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. It makes the most sense to me that way (versus chronologically beginning with the Magician's Nephew). Plus, I think TLTW&TW is the most readily accessible for kids.

Saw the Daniel Pinkwater recommendation - I would go for The Snark-Out Boys and the Avocado of Doom. Still my all-time favorite book, ever.

I loved The Hobbit as a kid as well.

I'll also throw in Watership Down.

Of all these, I would start with Narnia. Not only do I love it, but I have fond memories of my mother reading the ENTIRE series to me. Cover to cover. I think it's perfect for what you're looking for.

The Doctor
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
I have never read any of the Chronicles of Narnia ( I did see the movie and liked it.) how important is it to start with book one?
IMHO, it's important to read them in the order in which they were written (The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; Prince Caspian; The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; The Silver Chair; The Horse and His Boy; The Magician's Nephew; and The Last Battle). Yes, I realize that the author went on record with a different preference, but I don't care. If he wanted them read in his order, he should have written them in that order.

And, so as not to make a hijack out of this, I'd also like to suggest The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:38 PM
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Ooooh! I just remembered a serious classic: The Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander. Both your boy and your girl will LOVE these. Start at the beginning and work your way through.

The Docto
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:38 PM
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In No Particular Order as I am suppose to be folding laundry.


Five have a mystery to solve ( enid blyton)

Five go to demon rocks ( enid blyton)

Children of willow farm ( blyton)

Five go off to camp ( blyton)

Once upon a marigold (ferris)

Wind in the willows

Wolf Story - ( Mccleery) (we have this on cd. Kids love it.)

Castle in the attic ( winthrop)

Battle for the castle (winthrop)

Swallows and Amazons ( Ransome)

The High King ( Alexander)

Redwall ( Jacques)

Westmark ( alexander)

Half Magic ( eager)

The double fudge Dare. ( ladd)

Afternoon of the elves ( Lisle)

Prisoner of Zenda ( anthony hope)

Belle Prater's boy (white)

Holes ( sachar)

A wrinkle in Time ( L'engle)

Ghost in the noonday sun ( fleischman)

TGhe ghost in the tokaido inn ( hoobler)

The Dark Frigate (Hawes)

Family under the bridge ( carlson)

Secret of the Ruby Ring ( Macgrory)

Me and my little brain ( fitzgerald)

Great brain does it again.

School house in the woods (caudill)

A little princess ( burnett)

All of a kind family ( taylor)

The skull of truth ( coville)

The watsons go to birmingham 1963

Black Beauty ( Usborne version. very good for a nice condensed one, IMHO)

The door in the wall ( de angeli)

My father's dragon ( gannet)

The egypt game ( snyder)

Pyrdain Chronicles ( alexander)

The little prince

Linnets and Valerians

The Wind Boy ( Ethel Cook Elliot)

from the mixed up files of basil frankenwiler

Wainscot Weasel

Peter and the Star catchers ( by Dave Barry & someone else. I'm wondering if I can read this first then Peter Pan.)

I have about 30 or more that are too old ( holocaust stories and WW2 or ww1 time period stories) and my daughter is trying to levitate the dog right now, so I am a little distracted.
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:46 PM
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And I'd like to add that anytime a Kids Book Discussion Thread comes along, I make notes like a madwoman and know that I must find these books to make my children Doper Material or something.

Which is how I came to find Enid Blyton with a score of her HTF books at a resale shop and learning about the joys of Asterix and how very hard to find his books are and when I do how they cost me $10 per book brand new. You guys really know how to just kick a girl in the pocket book.

If I put a full price estimate on the (kids) books that I've bought because of the Dope, just the stack that is waste high to me right now ( and it isn't all of the books that I've stashes aside from my kids.) I would have to say well over $7-8k. Fortunately, I'm a tightwad and only buy used ( mostly.)

I won't even go into what you people have cost me for Big People Books.
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Old 04-20-2006, 05:47 PM
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My son adores Asterix by the way. Thanks to whomever that doper was that intro'd me to this fun character!
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Old 04-20-2006, 06:44 PM
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Where the Red Fern Grows, by Wilson Rawls. An absolutely fantastic book about a boy and his dogs and a true classic. It's also good for boys and girls.

There's a kind of a scary bit toward the end, however, so you may want to screen it for the 6 year old first.
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Old 04-20-2006, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
Half Magic ( eager.
I was just coming in to suggest this one. In fact, all of Edgar Eager's books are wonderful. A few of my other favorites to read to my kids (and now my 7yo neice):
Manhattan is Missing
The Phantom Tollbooth
Matilda
James & The Giant Peach
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Old 04-20-2006, 07:10 PM
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Goody!

I have the entire fat book of The Prydain Chronicles.


Does anyone know of a Cliff Notes et al site on line that summarizes or even spoils a book ( kids and adults).
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Old 04-20-2006, 07:38 PM
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How'bout The sword in the stone, or maybe something else vaguely similar? There's also Roger Lancelyn Green's books--he did very good Robin Hood, Arthur, and Greek myths to boot, or Howard Pyle's versions if you want to get people saying "Forsooth, varlet!" (Note that R. L. Green was an Inkling, too!)

Also, if you like HP and Alexander Lloyd, have you tried Diana Wynne Jones? You can start with Lives of Christopher Chant for the kids, and get Fire and hemlock for yourself...if you've never read her, you should! I'm pretty sure you'd like her a lot.
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Old 04-20-2006, 07:43 PM
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BTW, I think your idea is great. I've been wondering what to do this summer that isn't 'school' and I have a ton of books I'm dying to read to them--summer will be a great chance to just do that. (No, I hadn't put a lot of thought into it yet.)

Oh, have you ever read Eleanor Farjeon? Go get The little bookroom and see what you think! She wrote lots of books and poems; they're not easy to get now, but your library might have some.
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Old 04-20-2006, 07:49 PM
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OK, I"m going to stop now, really I am. I just keep thinking of things.

Did you see that movie, Nanny McPhee? Well, the Nurse Matilda books it was loosely based on are now back in print, and it turns out they're very funny. They're by Christianna Brand, and if you like Edward Ardizzone's illustrations at all, you should definitely look into the book; she was his cousin and they grew up hearing Nurse Matilda stories together.

And speaking of Ardizzone, have you ever read his Little Tim picture books? They are great! The first one is Little Tim and the brave sea captain; lots of danger and ships and stuff. He wrote others too.

Now, we are going to eat dinner. Really we are.
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Old 04-20-2006, 08:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
I have never read any of the Chronicles of Narnia ( I did see the movie and liked it.) how important is it to start with book one?
Depends on what you mean by "book one." Do you realize your stepping into a big controversy here? All seven are stand-alone stories, but I agree with the moajority opinion that has been expressed here and in other threads where the question has come up: read them in the order they were originally published (i.e. starting with The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, not the chronological order. (Though The Magician's Nephew happens first chronologically, it's more satisfying if you're already familiar with Narnia.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoorYorick
Sorry for the double post, but I just thought of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, especially since you specified children's classics. A wonderful book for a 6 and 8 year old, and different enough from the movie to make it new to them.
This was the first thing I thought of, perhaps because I remember reading Oz books to my younger brothers when we were kids. If they like Wizard, you can keep going with the rest of the series.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hello Again
"Mrs. Frisbee and the Rats of NIMH" by Robert C. O'Brien
Good one. I remember enjoying this one when my (I think) fourth grade teacher read it to the class.
Quote:
Originally Posted by delphica
The Treasure Seekers, Five Children and It, etc etc E. Nesbit
These are a bit twee, but still enjoyable. She's got a little wicked streak, too.
Agreed. IIRC Nesbit was a big influence on C. S. Lewis when he wrote Narnia, though Nesbit's children tend to have magical adventures in this world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
The High King ( Alexander)
This is Book Five of the Chronicles of Prydain (which I see is also on your list). If you read these, do so in order—and they are very good. I'm familiar with some of the other books on your list, there aren't any I'd veto, although Me and My Little Brain is best read after you've read one or more of the "Great Brain" books.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangermom
Also, if you like HP and Alexander Lloyd, have you tried Diana Wynne Jones? You can start with Lives of Christopher Chant for the kids
Yes, her Chronicles of Chrestomanci (of which this is one) are in the same vein as Harry Potter.
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Old 04-20-2006, 08:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink
Yes, her Chronicles of Chrestomanci (of which this is one) are in the same vein as Harry Potter.
Yeah, but she did it first! (Some of her more devoted fans did quite a bit of muttering when HP came out; they felt it was too familiar. However, it's not like 'young boy discovers magical talents' is a new storyline invention.)
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Old 04-20-2006, 09:00 PM
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Quickie comments on some of the books on your list


blyton titles -- fun as expected

Wind in the willows - I think I was traumatized by this as a child, but obviously a classic for a reason.

Swallows and Amazons - LOVE THIS SERIES but its not to everyone's taste. You might want to read the first chapter and see if it bores you (lots and lots of details about camping and sailing, like details about all the different knots they learn) because if it does, reading the entire thing aloud might put you in an early grave.

Half Magic ( eager) - I almost put Time Garden by Eager on my list. These will go quick as read-alouds, but fun.

Belle Prater's boy (white) - my gut reaction is that this is a little above your kids' interest level, given their ages. I really liked it, maybe in a few years.

Holes ( sachar) - I liked this very much, some parts might be a little scary.

A wrinkle in Time ( L'engle) -- again, I think a *little* above age level unless your youngest is a sophisticated reader. Magic and stuff, but more philosophy and theory than Harry Potter and co.

Me and my little brain ( fitzgerald) -- you don't really have to read these in order, but this one is toward the end of the Great Brain series.

Great brain does it again -- ditto

All of a kind family ( taylor) -- very good, especially if your kids like "old-fashioned" stories.

Black Beauty ( Usborne version. very good for a nice condensed one, IMHO) Some of the condensed ones leave out the HIGHLY TRAUMATIZING horse death scene, hopefully this is one of them.

The egypt game ( snyder) Fun, light hearted, fluffy

Linnets and Valerians - oh my gosh, haven't thought of this in YEARS, I remember loving it

from the mixed up files of basil frankenwiler - I could have sworn I put this on my list, good choice.

I have about 30 or more that are too old ( holocaust stories and WW2 or ww1 time period stories) and my daughter is trying to levitate the dog right now, so I am a little distracted. -- I'm dying to know if Twenty and Ten (sometimes published with the title The Secret Cave) is one of your holocaust stories ... it's a good one and age appropriate (and not scary).

How are things going with your dog?
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Old 04-20-2006, 09:07 PM
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Almost forgot: Danny, Champion of the World and Rascal are both books that virtually every boy I've ever given them to have loved.
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Old 04-20-2006, 09:14 PM
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I second Watership Down. If they like it, you can pick up Tales From Watership Down, which is a collection of short stories and rabbit myths.

Charlotte's Web

Alice in Wonderland

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (skip the latin fish classification paragraphs)

The BFG (or almost anything else by Roald Dahl)

Good old Grimm's fairy tales.

D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths. I loved the pictures in this one when I was a kid. I see they have a Norse book, too; gotta love those Vikings.
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Old 04-20-2006, 09:28 PM
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Perhaps Freddy the Pig will come around and recommend the books about himself. (If he doesn't, I will.)

Shirley you realize that your kids are just going to have to stay 8 and 6 long enough for you to read all these books to them!
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Old 04-20-2006, 11:40 PM
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I manage the children's section of the bookshop where I work, and I'm mentally scanning the shelves as I type...

Roald Dahl is awalys good - I loved him when I was a kid. Charlie & the Chocolate Factory might be good, or Matilda. Someone's already mentioned Danny, Champion of the World and if they like that you might want to follow it up with his two autobiographies - Boy and Flying Solo.

Zizou Corder's Lionboy trilogy is fantastic- set in a carless future, a boy who can talk Cat has to join up with a floating circus to try and rescue his parents, who might have invented a cure for asthma and return his new leonine friends to their homelands in Kenya. If they sat through and enjoyed Harry Potter, they should have no problem with this.

I've just read (in the interests of good customer service, of course ) Odo Hirsh's Hazel Green books. They're quirky and fun, but I prefer his Bartlett books - an intrepid explorer and a taciturn strongman go on a variety of adventures. They're short, but lots of fun.
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Old 04-20-2006, 11:46 PM
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Ooh, has anybody mentioned the Green Knowe books by L. M. Boston?
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Old 04-20-2006, 11:52 PM
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Of course, not all of those were classics, in the traditional sense of the word... so I also reccomend Heidi by Johanna Spyri, Black Beauty by Anna Sewell and the early Chalet School books, by Eleanor M. Brent-Dyer. (There are roughly one million billion of these in the series; the first few are easy to find)
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Old 04-21-2006, 12:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manx
Roald Dahl is awalys good - I loved him when I was a kid. Charlie & the Chocolate Factory might be good, or Matilda.
Slightly on-topic (mildly embarrassing) hijack:

DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, READ THEM CHARLIE AND THE GREAT GLASS ELEVATOR!

I read this book at about 8 - and I was *terrified* of the Vermicious Knids. I mean nightmare terrified. I mean cold sweat, hide-under-the-bed terrified. The kind of terror that slips up your spine and paralyzes your entire body with fear!

(Actually, now that I look back, it's probably better to be scared of Vermicious Knids than terrorism or nuclear proliferation or something like that. They're like big liquid Hershey Kisses really.)

But I'm warning you: Read this book to them at your own peril!!! BEWARE I SAY!

End slight on-topic (mildly embarrassing) hijack.

I feel better now. The Doctor
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Old 04-21-2006, 12:49 AM
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Typical male logic ahead...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
In No Particular Order as I am suppose to be folding laundry.
I say, Shirley - you're not a chap, are you?!
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Old 04-21-2006, 03:11 AM
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As a guy with pretty much all the Redwall books, I heartily recommend them. Bear in mind that there's occasional death, though.
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Old 04-21-2006, 05:23 AM
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My Goodness, these kids are going to be well read! Or well read-to) .
I have only one to add. Just So Stories by Kipling. A book of short stories about animals. Fun to do.
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Old 04-21-2006, 06:23 AM
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If you like Ransome's Swallows and Amazons then try some of the others in the series - my seven year old LOVED them and we have read them all a few times each.

I like Winter Holiday, Swallowdale and Secret Water but there are a few more if you can find them.
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Old 04-21-2006, 06:58 AM
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I want to add a series of books I'd read to The Monster: The Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patrcia C. Wrede. Great fun. Begins with Dealing with Dragons, where a Princess of a most proper kingdom decides that being a proper princess is far too much strain - so she runs off to become a dragon's princess, instead.
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Old 04-21-2006, 07:10 AM
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I came in to suggest things by Diana Wynne Jones - [i]Lives of Christopher Chant, Charmed Life, Witch Week[/] (maybe hold off on The Magicians of Caprona for now, but it might be fine, and a lot of the other things that she's written) - but since they were already mentioned, maybe The Ordinary Princess by M.M. Kaye - it doesn't have the magical element, but it's a delightful story. It's girlier than some, so your daughter may like it better than your son. Maybe something to read with just her if you can do that?


Also, maybe the Children of the Lamp books - there are only 2 out so far, the Akhenaten Adventure and The Blue Djinn of Babylon - they're about a set of twins who find out they're Djinn. Not high literature by any means, but they're fun.
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Old 04-21-2006, 07:57 AM
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I guess I'm late to the party! You guys seem to have it all covered here, but I do have one recommendation that hasn't been mentioned yet: The Tripod books by John Christopher.

I actually have a couple of others in mind which I can't quite grasp. I'll have to go home and look on the bookshelves.
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Old 04-21-2006, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Who
I'll also throw in Watership Down.
For a six-year-old? What kind of evil sadist are you?

Seriously, Watership Down is one of my all-tie favorite books, but many animals are killed over the course of the book, often in fairly gruesome fashions. There's a death cult in the book There are prophetic nightmares of genocide in the book. You do NOT want to read this book to a six-year-old; I'd hesitate before giving it to a nine-year-old to read.

Lloyd Alexander, though, is brilliant: I envy your reading of The Prydain Chronicles for the first time. Roald Dahl is also wonderful.

If you'd like something slightly less fantasy-oriented, consider Maniac Magee, a Newberry-winning book that touches on homelessness, race relations, and other issues in a light, entertaining fashion. There's also The Watsons Go to Birmingham, a book about an African American family that travels from somewhere up north (Chicago, maybe?) to Birmingham during the mid-sixties, and somehow manages to make it a funny, charming book that is nowhere near as grim as it sounds from the plot synopsis.

Daniel
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Old 04-21-2006, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand of Dorkness
For a six-year-old? What kind of evil sadist are you?

Seriously, Watership Down is one of my all-tie favorite books, but many animals are killed over the course of the book, often in fairly gruesome fashions. There's a death cult in the book There are prophetic nightmares of genocide in the book. You do NOT want to read this book to a six-year-old; I'd hesitate before giving it to a nine-year-old to read.
I agree. I don't know whether I'd classify Watership Down as an adults' book that kids can enjoy or as a kids' book that adults can enjoy, but it's definitely not a cute little story about cute little bunny rabbits.
  #42  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:30 AM
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Here are my favorites from when I was a kid. I know I am repeating some already suggested, but they're just that good:

Owls in the Family, by Farley Mowat

The Shy Stegosaurus of Cricket Creek, by Evelyn Sibley Lampman and Hubert Buel

Cheaper By the Dozen (not related to the movie, thank God), by Frank B. Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey

The Prydain Chronicles, by Lloyd Alexander

The BFG, by Roald Dahl

All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot

Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle, by Betty MacDonald and Hilary Knight
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  #43  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand of Dorkness
For a six-year-old? What kind of evil sadist are you?


Hey, come on - at least I warned of the potential dangers of the Vermicious Knids!

Quote:
Seriously, Watership Down is one of my all-tie favorite books, but many animals are killed over the course of the book, often in fairly gruesome fashions. There's a death cult in the book There are prophetic nightmares of genocide in the book. You do NOT want to read this book to a six-year-old; I'd hesitate before giving it to a nine-year-old to read.
I suppose I disagree - only because I read this book when I was very young, and just kept reading and re-reading it.

I'll agree that it's got some tough parts. I've often read this quote widely attributed to Richard Adams: "I derived early the idea that one must at all costs tell the truth to children, not so much about mere physical pain and fear, but about the really unanswerable things—what [writer] Thomas Hardy called 'the essential grimness of the human situation.'"

But I'll be honest - as a kid, I didn't enjoy this book for showing me the essential grimness of the human situation. I liked this book because it was a kickass adventure of talking rabbits. Not fluffy boring bunnies, but warriors and prophets, etc. It's an epic story - and a story that *moves* - which is very important to an ADHD addled kid reading the book on commercial breaks during Saturday Morning Cartoons while eating Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs.

Moreover, what was really important to me as a child...

SPOILER:
... was that the main characters made it to the end of the book. I didn't really care about the devastation and stuff of the other warrens. That was tangential - it was all about Hazel and Fiver making it.


But, if Shirley wants to wait till her kids are older, that's cool. Just stick to something safe like the Prydain Chronicles. Kids'll be having nightmares about the Horned King, and just wait till they meet the three witches... *grumble* *grumble* ... Of course, Gurgi is fluffy like a bunny, so I suppose that's ok...

The Doctor
  #44  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
I have never read any of the Chronicles of Narnia ( I did see the movie and liked it.) how important is it to start with book one?
I'm currently rereading the series. Book 1, The Magician's Nephew, is important in that it introduces the White Witch and explains how she came to rule Narnia.

They're short, easy reads and I'm enjoying them very much.
  #45  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:45 AM
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I'll also mention the Encyclopedia Brown books, as they contain several "mysteries" and are easy enough for kids to figure out, and there is a mystery "novel" for kids called The Westinghouse Game. (Is that it?)
  #46  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by dangermom
Oh, have you ever read Eleanor Farjeon? Go get The little bookroom and see what you think! She wrote lots of books and poems; they're not easy to get now, but your library might have some.

I've heard of Eleanor Farjeon, probably from the Dope, but she is now on my list of books to check out.
  #47  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by glee
I say, Shirley - you're not a chap, are you?!
I be a female.
  #48  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:58 AM
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[hijack]

Having watched the Narnia movie, I was wondering what in the heck was up with the White Witches dress. It looked like her back had a box strapped to it under the dress. Like maybe she had a scaly back or something.

Is this a relevant plot line or just some whim of the costume designer? It was really distracting.
  #49  
Old 04-21-2006, 11:59 AM
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[hijack]

Having watched the Narnia movie, I was wondering what in the heck was up with the White Witches dress. It looked like her back had a box strapped to it under the dress. Like maybe she had a scaly back or something.

Is this a relevant plot line or just some whim of the costume designer? It was really distracting.


Manx thanks for the link. It looks good.

The Diane Wynne Jones books look good too.

My kids are going to have to stay 8 and 6 for a long time.

Or I'm going to need a time turner for this summer!
  #50  
Old 04-21-2006, 12:05 PM
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Not to spoil it too much, you DO get the backstory on the White Witch by reading all the books. Scales and a ridge don't come into the picture, but she was a lot more, um, willowy in the movie than I pictured her in my mind's eye from the books.
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