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  #1  
Old 08-12-2006, 03:33 PM
diggleblop diggleblop is offline
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Any ways to become an Attorney without a Juris Doctor?

Are there any states where you can become a practicing/licensed lawyer without obtaining a Juris Doctor/law degree from a law school? Say I taught myself Patent & Trademark Law in a few years at a law library and felt I could pass the Bar. What state, if any, could I take the exam?

Also, in Louisiana and Washington, can you become a Lawyer without taking Multistate Bar Examination? What's with those two states?
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  #2  
Old 08-12-2006, 03:36 PM
psychloan psychloan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diggleblop
Are there any states where you can become a practicing/licensed lawyer without obtaining a Juris Doctor/law degree from a law school? [/b]
I believe that New York and Vermont allow you to "apprentice" for 4 years and then sit for the bar.

I believe that California allows you to study at an unaccredited school if you take an extra exam. Perhaps correspondence school qualifies?
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Old 08-12-2006, 03:56 PM
Squink Squink is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diggleblop
Are there any states where you can become a practicing/licensed lawyer without obtaining a Juris Doctor/law degree from a law school?
In this Summary of Requirements for Admission to Practice Law in California, towards the bottom of the page, under 'Legal Education', it looks like you can avoid law school:
Quote:
Pursuant to Rule VII, Section 2 of the Rules Regulating Admission to Practice Law in California, in order to establish eligibility every general applicant must have

(a) Graduated from a law school approved by the American Bar Association or accredited by Committee of Bar Examiners; or

(b) Completed at least four years of law study in any of the following manners

1. In a law school that is authorized by the State of California to confer professional degrees; is registered with the Committee of Bar Examiners; and which requires classroom attendance of its students for a minimum of 270 hours a year; or

2. In a law office in the State of California and under the personal supervision of an active member of the State Bar of California for at least five years; or

3. In the chambers and under the personal supervision of a judge of a court of record of this state; or

4. In a correspondence law school registered with the Committee of Bar Examiners, and requires no less than 864 hours of preparation and study per year; or

5. By any combination of the methods referred to in this subsection (b).
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Old 08-12-2006, 04:42 PM
Billdo Billdo is offline
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In New York, you may take and pass the first year of law school and train for 4 years under a licensed attorney and be qualified to sit for the bar exam and be admitted if you pass.
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Old 08-12-2006, 07:07 PM
diggleblop diggleblop is offline
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Ah ha ! Thanks !
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