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  #1  
Old 08-13-2006, 12:11 PM
Raguleader Raguleader is offline
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Amusing nicknames for things?

So, it occurs to me that lots of airplanes get what I consider to be highly amusing nicknames (I'll name a few in a moment), so I figure we should have a thread listing (and explaining, if possible or necessary) funny nicknames for various things (vehicles, buildings, whatever).

My short list to start with:

F-16 Fighting Falcon, AKA "The Lawn Dart" (It's got a dart-like pointy tip on the nose, and early in their career the planes were plagued with crashes)

F-15 Eagle, AKA "The Flying Tennis Court" (If you ever look at the top of this plane, you are presented to a huge expanse of relatively flat area)

B-52 Stratofortress, AKA the BUFF (Big Ugly Fat Fu -erm- Friend), it's Big, it's Ugly, and it's Fat.

Cessna T-37, AKA the "Tweet" or "6,000lb Dog Whistle" (very loud, very high-pitched engines)

RA-5 Vigilante, AKA the Passionate Pachyderm (relatively huge Navy recconisance/strike bomber, known for the elephant-like squealing sounds the engines made as the pilot came in for landing on carriers).
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  #2  
Old 08-13-2006, 12:20 PM
Zeldar Zeldar is online now
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Nashville's Bell South building has the nickname Batman Building but this picture isn't quite as clear as other views from greater distances for why that's such an apt nickname.
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  #3  
Old 08-13-2006, 12:54 PM
Nic2004 Nic2004 is offline
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many years ago Cape Canaveral was conducting tests of the SNARK missile and so many of then failed and went into the ocean, they began referring to these as "Snark infested waters".
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  #4  
Old 08-13-2006, 01:16 PM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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My heavily bearded, moustached, husband had a cigarette in his mouth when he asked me to pass him the "drift punch". I couldn't understand what he said and I replied, "What's a jerk wrench?" Since then, any unnamed tool is called a jerk wrench.
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  #5  
Old 08-13-2006, 01:30 PM
Fetchund Fetchund is offline
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Ummm... maybe TMI.

Poop that refuses to flush is a "Molly"...


... for "The Unsinkable Molly Brown".


(sorry!)
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  #6  
Old 08-13-2006, 02:00 PM
archmichael archmichael is offline
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Thanks to the Simpsons. I like to call fireworks, Chinese Sky Candy
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  #7  
Old 08-13-2006, 02:34 PM
Marlitharn Marlitharn is offline
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My grandma had a sonofabitch. Mom has the sonofabitch now. Someday I'll have the sonofabitch, unless my older sister wants it, and eventually the sonofabitch will pass on to either my daughter or my oldest niece.

Grandma wasn't senile, but sometimes she forgot the proper names for things, like "cedar chest". She's been gone for 15 years, but that chest will be known as the sonofabitch as long as our bloodline lasts.
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  #8  
Old 08-13-2006, 02:45 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
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Back in the early 1980s, Dorothy Johnson was the mayor of Appleton, Wisconsin. In response to the building of the Fox River Mall, the largest shopping mall in the state, in Grand Chute (just outside Appleton), Dorothy spearheaded the construction of the downtown Avenue Mall (which involved, among other things, screwing up the traffic flow of the heart of the city). Long story short, the Avenue Mall turned out to be a colossal commercial failure, and because of its vast amount of vacant store space, it is known as the Johnson Space Center.
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  #9  
Old 08-13-2006, 04:01 PM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is online now
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The Renaissance Tower in downtown Sacramento is known as the Darth Vader building.
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  #10  
Old 08-13-2006, 04:07 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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I always liked the Super Guppy
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  #11  
Old 08-13-2006, 04:12 PM
archmichael archmichael is offline
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Tattoos on the small of a woman's back is called a 'tramp stamp', but I don't use the term because I like those tats.

Thongs that poke up above low cut jeans are called 'whale tails'.
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  #12  
Old 08-13-2006, 04:13 PM
elucidator elucidator is offline
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Terms for non-existent automotive systems, to be used in front of the auto-ignorant (esp. girls). "Really should have those muffler bearings aligned!" "Got the right settings for your torsion valves?" Etc.
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  #13  
Old 08-13-2006, 04:58 PM
Sternvogel Sternvogel is offline
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The Citroen 2CV (whose official name was shorthand for deux chaveaux, or "two horses", owing to its low horsepower rating) has acquired many affectionate/deprecatory sobriquets around the world. As the linked page states:

Quote:
Popular French nicknames were "Deuche" and "Dedeuche". They also called it "an umbrella on wheels" and "the big beast". The Dutch were the first to call it "de lelijke eend", the ugly duck, while the Flemish called it "de geit", the goat. In Germany it is called "die Ente", the duck. English nicknames are Tin Snail and Dolly. In the former Yugoslavia the car was called "Spaček" (pronounced "spa-check", meaning--affectionately--"oddity" or "abberation"). In Spanish-speaking countries they were nicknamed "patito feo" ("Ugly duckling"), "citrola" or "citroneta" (derived from "CitroŽn"). In Finland, the 2CV is known as "Ršttisitikka" (Finnish for "rag CitroŽn") because of its canvas roof.

Outside France, the 2CV's most common nickname today is "The Duck", which seemed to be endorsed by CitroŽn which released a stuffed toy animal in the 1980s representing a duck with CitroŽn on its side and 2CV under its right foot. It is commonly referred to as the "Deux Chevaux" and in Britain it is also known as the "upside down pram" or the "Tin Snail".
The Spanish citrola and citroneta have special resonance -- the words are similar to citron, the French term for the fruit known to English-speakers as a lemon!
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  #14  
Old 08-13-2006, 09:40 PM
Raguleader Raguleader is offline
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I've heard various nicknames for firearms, such as "Combat Tuppleware" for the Glocks, and my own nickname for the Beretta 92 (after having various examples, all loaners, jam multiple times for me) is the "Damned Pasta Pistol".

Tarant County Community College up around Dallas somewhere is called, according to a friend of mine who went there, "Harvard on the Highway" Similarly, the University of Texas at Arlington is colloquially known as "The University of Texas... Almost."

Texas A&M University's ROTC is set up as a Corps of Cadets (all the cadets live together, dine together, etc. and train extensively outside of class when they're not studying). The cadets who aren't in the Band are called CTs, short for "Corps Turds", and cadets in the band (the entire marching band is made up of cadets at A&M) are called BQs (short for Band Queers). While the longform names are discouraged by the military officers in the ROTC program at A&M, the shorthand acronyms are used all the time.

Speaking of the cadets, the seniors wear really nice leather riding boots as part of their uniforms, and students who date these cadets (or who particularly want to) are refered to as "Boot Chasers".

Female cadets in the Corps are called WAGs (short for Woman AGgies), though the name is now considered somewhat derrogatory, it was apparantly started by the first generations of female cadets at A&M, as a means of pre-empting "Maggies" from being tagged onto them.

Silver Wings, a Public Service and Professional Self Development student organization, was originally known as "Angel Flight", and consisted mostly of girls dating Air Force ROTC cadets. Because of these roots, the organization is sometimes refered to as "The Future Air Force Wives' Club" (And while they get riled up when someone calls them that, an awful lot of them DO seem to marry newly-minted Air Force lieutenants, probably due to the long-standing cooperation between Silver Wings and the Arnold Air Society, the Air Force ROTC public service organization).
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  #15  
Old 08-13-2006, 10:44 PM
iwakura43 iwakura43 is offline
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I don't recall the context, but was amused to hear the ranting of overly-enthusiastic Glock pistol advocates (mostly CounterStrike players who don't know much about actual guns) called a "Glockenspiel."
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  #16  
Old 08-13-2006, 10:47 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Was it the T-37, or the T-33 that was called the 'Converter'? (Converts fuel into noise.)

My g/f calls my Jeep 'Grape Ape' because it's big and purple.
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  #17  
Old 08-13-2006, 10:57 PM
LilyoftheValley LilyoftheValley is offline
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Despite years of riding the Red Line over it, I never could remember the real name of the Salt and Pepper Bridge in Boston. I had to look it up to recall it's really the Longfellow Bridge. I bet if you asked people on the street, more people would call it the Salt and Pepper than the Longfellow.
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  #18  
Old 08-13-2006, 10:58 PM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
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A dixieland (aka "moldy fig") jazz fan of my acquaintance refers to saxophones as "cat extinguishers." He says he got the term from a 1920s Krazy Kat comic strip where Ignatz the mouse beaned Krazy over the head with one.
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  #19  
Old 08-13-2006, 11:04 PM
Ranchoth Ranchoth is offline
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The Junior College I've attended has, on campus, the "William B. Race Health Sciences Building."

Being the loyal Northern Californian college student that I am, I always think of it as the "Race Sciences Building."

And I understand that the A-7 Corsair II is known as the "People Eater" in some circles, due to the design and location of the engine's air intake. (I've seen video demonstrating this pretty clearly. Ow.)
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  #20  
Old 08-13-2006, 11:08 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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We refer to our cheese graters as "rapists", used to "rape" cheese or carrots or whatever. It's not really offensive in origin, it's simply that sometimes, hubby uses the French word for things in English - in this case, "r‚pe" (r-ahp). It's been years since that hilarious mistake!
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  #21  
Old 08-13-2006, 11:10 PM
elucidator elucidator is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A.
...My g/f calls my Jeep 'Grape Ape' because it's big and purple.
That's utterly adorable! How do you stand it!
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  #22  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:01 AM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
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One of Canon's early photocopiers, (the NP-80,) had the nickname "The Toaster."

It used solvent-based liquid toner and had a tendency to burst into flame during heavy use.

Similarly (well, not really,) the Airco DH-2 (an early British WWI fighter) was called the "Spinning Incinerator."

It tended to go into uncontrollable spins and, well, burst into flame.

If you don't want an ignominious nickname, I'd advise against bursting into flame.
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  #23  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:11 AM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
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Oh, I forgot the "amusing" part.

Uh... "The Marshmallow in Bondage" made me smirk the first ten thousand times I heard it it. (Pic.)
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  #24  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:54 AM
picunurse picunurse is offline
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Driving from the ferry one day, we passed the "Deer Creek Fish Hatchery" Some how my brain translated it to "Deer Hatchery" My husband nearly drove off the road laughing, when I quite seriously said "There's a deer hatchery back there." Now, all fish hatcheries are deer hatcheries in our family.

The Columbia Tower is the box the Space Needle came in.
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  #25  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:57 AM
Askance Askance is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archmichael
Thongs that poke up above low cut jeans are called 'whale tails'.
And rolls of fat that poke up above low cut jeans are called muffin tops .
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  #26  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:11 AM
boytyperanma boytyperanma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyoftheValley
Despite years of riding the Red Line over it, I never could remember the real name of the Salt and Pepper Bridge in Boston. I had to look it up to recall it's really the Longfellow Bridge. I bet if you asked people on the street, more people would call it the Salt and Pepper than the Longfellow.
I've been calling it the graffiti bridge for years. Since nothing had been done about the vadalism from years back. Unfortunatly I know a few people who have some responcability in that.
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  #27  
Old 08-14-2006, 03:02 AM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is online now
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Dublin statues and their nicknames. Many of these are quite clever, and are much more descriptive than the actual figures or things the represent.
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  #28  
Old 08-14-2006, 04:15 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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My hometown has a statue of the Blessed Heart of Mary and a bigger one of the Heart of Jesus (however that one is referred to in English), in two different hills.

The Heart of Jesus is known as "Manazas", which means "big hands" or "sloppy". You see: its hands are pretty big (normal, considering that the model for the body was a local farmer and some of those have hands like shovels) _and_ the poor guy keeps losing them every time he gets struck by lightning. No lightning has fallen in the town since he was built, it always hits the statue. When the Communist Party tried to start a motion to remove the statue, they were told that no way, it's a helluva lightning rod so it stays.
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  #29  
Old 08-14-2006, 05:43 AM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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We call the Marina Towers in Chicago "The Corn Cobs".

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sscornelius/198180711/
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  #30  
Old 08-14-2006, 07:15 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranchoth
And I understand that the A-7 Corsair II is known as the "People Eater" in some circles, due to the design and location of the engine's air intake. (I've seen video demonstrating this pretty clearly. Ow.)
AKA 'SLUF'.
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  #31  
Old 08-14-2006, 07:21 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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There's a Henry Moore "Reclining Female Nude" sculpture in one of the side courts at MIT. The students call it The Giant Golden Bunny Rabbit because, seen from one angle, that's exactly what it looks like. Right down to the eye.
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  #32  
Old 08-14-2006, 08:14 AM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
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Women who chase cops are sometimes called holster sniffers. I find it an amusing term.
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  #33  
Old 08-14-2006, 08:22 AM
Zeldar Zeldar is online now
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CalMeacham, I couldn't help but wonder if in your sig:

Because you're Mayan
I Walk the Lion

you might find a way to change "Walk" to "Wok."

I did see a gag cookbook one time: "101 Ways To Wok Your Dog" and I guess it's feasible that some industrious inhabitant of lion-infested country might take up Chinese cookware and techniques to whip up some tasty lion stir fry for the gang.

Who knows what the Maya must have thought of in the way of preparing the local feline catch? I wok the jaguar. I wok the puma. I wok the sheriff.

Just a thought. Love the sig -- changed or not.
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  #34  
Old 08-14-2006, 08:26 AM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
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Richard Serra's installation Tilted Arc was known to New Yorkers as That Ugly Fucking Wall.
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  #35  
Old 08-14-2006, 08:35 AM
Zeldar Zeldar is online now
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Years ago and long since departed the area there was a steak house with a maze-like set of hallways done up in Olde English decor and going by the name of "The Jolly Ox." Decent food and atmosphere but it went under for some reason I can't recall. Place has changed hands many times and worn many names since then.

Anyway, we called it the "Pissed Off Jackass" for no really good reason.
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  #36  
Old 08-14-2006, 09:48 AM
Max Torque Max Torque is online now
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Since the OP started with planes...I always liked the nickname for the F-105 Thunderchief, because it was apparently sluggish on takeoff: the "Lead Sled".

And for buildings: a few years back, my alma mater spent a whole buncha money building an absurdly ornate parking structure. It has become known as the "Garage Mahal".
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  #37  
Old 08-14-2006, 10:38 AM
ColonelDax ColonelDax is offline
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When Mayor Ken Livingstone engineered the replacement of London's beloved Routemaster double-decker buses with so-called bendy buses made by Germany's MAN AG, the new equipment at first showed a disconcerting tendency to burst into flames, leading to the nickname of "Ken's chariots of fire."
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  #38  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:04 PM
Mindfield Mindfield is offline
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Montrťal-Mirabel International Airport was built in 1975 ostensibly as the "eastern gateway to Canada." It is (or was?) the second largest airport in the world, was very advanced for its day and cost tens of millions to build. Its remote location and dearth of connections to useful transport routes however made it extremely unpopular, and thus a colossal failure. Thereafter it became known as "The White Elephant."

There is also a hospital somewhere in the northern part of Toronto (I can't recall where exactly) which had a smokestack that was illuminated at night by purple floodlights. My girlfriend of the time pointed them out to me once and referred to the hospital as "The Purple Penis" for this reason.
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  #39  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:22 PM
JustAnotherGeek JustAnotherGeek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
There's a Henry Moore "Reclining Female Nude" sculpture in one of the side courts at MIT. The students call it The Giant Golden Bunny Rabbit because, seen from one angle, that's exactly what it looks like. Right down to the eye.
Alright... I think we're gonna need a picure of that one!
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  #40  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:47 PM
Raguleader Raguleader is offline
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Can't remember which fighter plane it was that was called the "Triple Threat"... it could shoot you, it could bomb you, or it could fall on you.

I met an Air Force officer (Security Police) who called the C-5A Galaxy Transports the "C--5 Bomber" because of the plane's apparant tendency to drop various components (landing gear, engines, wings, etc.) on things it was flying over.

Also, I like the catch-all nickname for very very large airplanes: "Aluminum Overcast"

Supposedly the North Vietnamese called the A-6 Intruder the "Baby B-52"

The school busses with the engine stickign out of the front? "Big Iron Dog" The ones with the flat fronts and the huge windsheild? "Cast Iron Twinkie"

Dunno about the T-33 or T-37 being the Converter, but I have heard the F-4 Phantom called the "Clean Air Converter" (converted clean air to thick black smoke at subsonic speeds)

Around the Texas A&M campus, there are pillar-shaped bulletin boards on various high-traffic sidewalks, where anyone can put up anything they want. The members of the sci-fi club refered to them as "Phallic Symbols"

The Military Sciences building at Texas A&M is refered to as the "Trigon". It's shaped kinda like the Pentagon, but with two sections missing (where the hot dog stand would be, there is a small parking lot for the military officers)

Speaking of the Pentagon's Hot dog stand.. located in the middle of the courtyard in the middle of the Pentagon, the stand is known as "Ground Zero", since any Russian or Chinese ICBMs intended for the Pentagon would most likely land right on top of the hot dog stand.
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  #41  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:22 PM
Bam Boo Gut Bam Boo Gut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
My heavily bearded, moustached, husband had a cigarette in his mouth when he asked me to pass him the "drift punch". I couldn't understand what he said and I replied, "What's a jerk wrench?" Since then, any unnamed tool is called a jerk wrench.
That's a flange sprocket round here!
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  #42  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:37 PM
Raguleader Raguleader is offline
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On Star Trek and Star Wars, everyone is always in need of a hydrospanner, which I don't think is ever actually shown (on an episode of DS9, we ARE shown an example of something that is specifically NOT a hydrospanner).

As far as my friends and I can figure out, a hydrospanner is some kind of pneumatic wrench.
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  #43  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:55 PM
Jayn_Newell Jayn_Newell is offline
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I mentioned this in another thread recently (and I still have no idea what it's supposed to be) but there's a statue on campus at Dalhousie University that's known among us students as the Six-Foot Exploding Penis.
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  #44  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:59 PM
bleach bleach is offline
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The Giant Golden Bunny Rabbit by Henry Moore.
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  #45  
Old 08-14-2006, 02:17 PM
Cluricaun Cluricaun is offline
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There's the thing in Millenium Park downtown Chicago that was named the Cloud Gate, but is refered to by everyone else as The Bean
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  #46  
Old 08-14-2006, 02:43 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is online now
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When my friend and I were both dating people who lived in North Carolina (we were both living in Ohio), I told him to keep an eye out for "nipple mountain" when driving through Mt. Airy, NC.

There's a large sloping hill (mountain?) there that has some sort of formation on the top with straight sides and a domed top. Looks JUST like a giant boob coming up from the ground. He totally saw it the first time he drove down there and we always thought it was hi-lar-i-ous.

Unfortunately I can't find any pics.
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  #47  
Old 08-14-2006, 03:04 PM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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This is sad, but funny in a gallows-humor sort of way. My former husband was in the Navy, assigned to the USS Forrestal, an aircraft carrier. The carrier was the scene of historic destruction on July 29, 1967, when a Zuni rocket accidentally fired on deck igniting fuel and ordinance, resulting in the destruction of 21 aircraft and killing 134 men. The ship was repaired and placed back into service, but forever after referred to as the Forest Fire.
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  #48  
Old 08-14-2006, 04:00 PM
FatBaldGuy FatBaldGuy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava
My hometown has a statue of the Blessed Heart of Mary and a bigger one of the Heart of Jesus (however that one is referred to in English), in two different hills.

The Heart of Jesus is known as "Manazas", which means "big hands" or "sloppy". You see: its hands are pretty big (normal, considering that the model for the body was a local farmer and some of those have hands like shovels) _and_ the poor guy keeps losing them every time he gets struck by lightning. No lightning has fallen in the town since he was built, it always hits the statue. When the Communist Party tried to start a motion to remove the statue, they were told that no way, it's a helluva lightning rod so it stays.
I'm puzzled. I'm trying to picture a statue of a heart that has hands, but not having much success.
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  #49  
Old 08-14-2006, 04:12 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by picunurse
The Columbia Tower is the box the Space Needle came in.
This is an echo of a very old joke that appeared in a MAD Magazine satire of "2001: A Space Odyssey" where they referred to the monolith as "the box that the U.N. Building came in."
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  #50  
Old 08-14-2006, 05:16 PM
Dijon Warlock Dijon Warlock is offline
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When we were children, we referred to our mother's breasts as "slaxybees."

I have no idea why. She was just the only one that had them in the family.
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