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  #1  
Old 08-22-2006, 08:15 AM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Do you sweat when you swim?

My workout is swimming laps in the pool at the gym. I'm getting good cardio excercise, if being out of breath quickly is any indication, and my muscles are tender and I'm losing weight!

Since I can't wear my headphones while I swim, I must think, and one of the things that popped into my head is "Does one sweat when one swims?"

Obviously, you are expending energy, but since the water temperature is lower than your body temperature, are you sweating? Or do you not notice because you're in the water?
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  #2  
Old 08-22-2006, 08:26 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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If you're hot, your sweat glands will produce sweat; you won't notice any cooling effect from it, because there's no difference (as far as your skin is concerned) between your sweat and all that water you're swimming in. Sweat only cools the skin when it evaporates, which it can't do underwater.

Of course you might not get hot enough to sweat, if it's a really cold pool and/or you're not moving much.
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  #3  
Old 08-22-2006, 08:38 AM
FormerMarineGuy FormerMarineGuy is offline
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From wwu.edu :

Quote:
When swimming in water that is at or below body temperature, the body heat is removed by conduction into the water that is in contact with the skin. That is usually a pretty effective means of cooling also, since the entire skin surface is being bathed in relatively cool fluid. But cooling by evaporation does not occur when immersed in water, so sweating, while there may be some due to continuing activity of the sweat-producing glands, does not occur to any appreciable degree when immersed, and is not a critical component of the body's heat control mechanism in such circumstances.
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  #4  
Old 08-22-2006, 09:45 AM
Edward The Head Edward The Head is online now
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If you're getting in a good work out then water that is above the mid 70s is too warm to swim in. Usually that means, for me, that when I first get in it's a tad too cold, but after a minute or so it's just fine. As for sweating I'm sure you would a bit, especially if the water is too warm. I know after a workout I steam for ten minutes or so, and that's after I've had a shower, I always have to wait to wear my glasses or they fog up.
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  #5  
Old 08-22-2006, 10:38 AM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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The pool is heated, but I've noticed it's a bit chilly after a rainstorm (it's an outside pool). I am finding better results than I ever did doing the stairs or the treadmill.
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  #6  
Old 08-22-2006, 12:47 PM
Chew Barker Chew Barker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ivylass
!

Since I can't wear my headphones while I swim, I must think
You dont need to think anymore, look at this mp3 player and head phones for swimming swiMP3
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  #7  
Old 08-23-2006, 11:59 AM
kinoons kinoons is offline
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I've never used the waterproof MP3 player, but I have used this with good success
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  #8  
Old 08-23-2006, 12:46 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chew Barker
You dont need to think anymore, look at this mp3 player and head phones for swimming swiMP3
Great. Something else I have to run out and buy RIGHT NOW!!!
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  #9  
Old 08-23-2006, 12:48 PM
slortar slortar is offline
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A few weeks back the pool where I swim at was turned up too high. I noticed after swimming a couple laps of front crawl that the bits of me that were out of the water were sweating once I'd stopped. Very odd. No idea for obvious reasons if that was still the case when I was under.
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  #10  
Old 08-23-2006, 12:50 PM
ChipsNDip ChipsNDip is offline
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As a former competetive swimmer (in high school) my observation is that you do sweat when you swim. Here's my reasoning: after an hour of intensive workout, even with the cooling effect of the water you'd still be quite hot. As you came to the end of the pool, and raised your head out of the water, you'd immediately start to sweat - unlike when you move from a cool room to a hot environment and it takes a second or two to start perspiring. It's not a big difference, but it was noticable. This leads me to believe that the sweat glands were already active while I was underwater.
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  #11  
Old 08-23-2006, 01:27 PM
CC CC is offline
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1) I think the doc had it right. You may be exhausted and "hot" and tired from swimming so hard, but the water that is at least 20 degrees below your body temperature is drawing heat away from your body. Your sweat glands, designed to produce sweat that will evaporate and cool you, do not need to function when the water, which is many times more efficient than air when it comes to removing heat from your body, is doing the same thing. I do not think that they will be functioning while you are swimming because there will be nothing to signal them that they need to remove heat from your body. Maybe they automatically kick in when we exert ourselves. But I doubt it. I swim in Lake Michigan every morning (until it gets too cold). I never feel as if I'm sweating, regardless of the outside temperature. I'd be interested in any other experts. We're just guessing.

2) hijack: I have recently invented (in my mind) a device which would project images onto the bottom of a pool. The boredom of swimming is not related to what we listen to, but the fact that we don't SEE anything interesting. I think if we could watch images - maybe a slide show of some event, maybe of last night's ball game, maybe of the news, maybe just nature slides, it would ease the tedium. Maybe porn. Who knows. Something to keep us in the pool. I'm working on it.
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  #12  
Old 08-23-2006, 02:34 PM
Edward The Head Edward The Head is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CC
I swim in Lake Michigan every morning (until it gets too cold). I never feel as if I'm sweating, regardless of the outside temperature. I'd be interested in any other experts. We're just guessing.
I don't think you'll find any experts around here, or many places. Swimming, from what I've seen, is misunderstood by lots of people, including doctors. I've read some say that swimming is a good exercise, but will not help with weight loss. I'd like to know how fast you swim and if you feel hot when you swim. I know there are times when I do sweat during a hard workout, unless you know of another way to taste salt from a pool. The warmer the pool the worse it gets, even a pool that's around 80 degrees is a pain to swim in.

Quote:
2) hijack: I have recently invented (in my mind) a device which would project images onto the bottom of a pool. The boredom of swimming is not related to what we listen to, but the fact that we don't SEE anything interesting. I think if we could watch images - maybe a slide show of some event, maybe of last night's ball game, maybe of the news, maybe just nature slides, it would ease the tedium. Maybe porn. Who knows. Something to keep us in the pool. I'm working on it.
Ewww, there's nothing wrong with swimming, I'm not bored when I swim, and I'm pretty sure the others on my team are not either. Speaking of teams ivylass, you might want to look into a US Masters team, you will get a better workout and might find yourself in better shape faster.
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  #13  
Old 08-23-2006, 02:51 PM
CC CC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward The Head
I've read some say that swimming is a good exercise, but will not help with weight loss.
With all due respect, you must have read that in a comic book. If you exercise, you use stored energy, and it's often in the form of fat. If you don't replace it with food, you lose weight. Swimming is just like any other type of physical activity - if you use more energy doing it than you take in eating, you'll lose weight. As to the taste of salt in the water of a pool, I think you can chalk that up to people jumping into the pool without showering, something I see far too often at the Y, and to the many chlorine salts and other materials they add to keep the pool relatively clear of bacteria. And as far as experts are concerned, I see you're a charter member - you ought to know that the SDMB has its share of very well informed members. "Expert" is a term we all should be careful of, I know, but I trust a lot of these folks to know the facts or know where to find them. FWIW,
two definitions of "expert" I'm used to hearing:
1) a guy who's more than 50 miles from home
2) a guy who knows 47 positions for making love but doesn't have a girlfriend
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  #14  
Old 08-23-2006, 03:11 PM
Waverly Waverly is offline
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You can sweat while swimming for the same reasons you can sweat while hiking in sub-zero weather. Sweat in this context is produced as a reaction to your internal body temperature. While water is a very effective coolant, it is acting on the surface. So, if your exercise is strenuous enough, and the water isnít surface cooling fast enough to counter the rise in internal temperature, you will sweat. Your body isnít smart enough to know that it wonít have an effect because evaporation wonít take place.

And swimming most certainly can help in weight loss anyway. Sweating out water weight isnít what really drives weight loss. It is the burning of calories, which means the decomposition of your bodyís fuel supply, which has mass. Any activity that will burn more calories than you would have without that activity can aid in weight loss. Swimming is good. Sex is better.
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  #15  
Old 08-23-2006, 04:18 PM
Lightray Lightray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CC
2) hijack: I have recently invented (in my mind) a device which would project images onto the bottom of a pool. The boredom of swimming is not related to what we listen to, but the fact that we don't SEE anything interesting. I think if we could watch images - maybe a slide show of some event, maybe of last night's ball game, maybe of the news, maybe just nature slides, it would ease the tedium. Maybe porn. Who knows. Something to keep us in the pool. I'm working on it.
further hijack: If you've ever seen someone swimming backstroke under open sky who strays back and forth, you've got a good preview of what will happen with your swim-o-vision goggles. Except they'll be swimming into other swimmers, and lane lines, and walls, and stuff. owie.

Also: guys in speedos + watching porn = hydrodynamic issues.
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  #16  
Old 08-23-2006, 06:52 PM
Edward The Head Edward The Head is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CC
With all due respect, you must have read that in a comic book.
Nope, see it all over, here is the first google
Quote:
When you swim breastroke or backstroke, you're burning about the same number of calories as a fast walk or a slow jog. However, for some reason, swimming appears to be less effective than other forms of exercise at promoting weight loss.
And here
Quote:
For those who are good swimmers and can glide through the water without becoming out of breath then swimming may be a very good exercise to burn the fat. If you tend to create big splashes and clumsily drive through the water while struggling to complete a full length of the pool, then it may be best to try another exercise to lose weight.
There are a number of cites like that. I didn't say I believed it since I've lost a lot of weight from just swimming. I still think that while not everyone sweats while swimming at least some people do.
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  #17  
Old 08-23-2006, 08:16 PM
Waverly Waverly is offline
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[/QUOTE]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward The Head
Nope, see it all over, here is the first google
The internet if full of idiots. I think those are words to live by. It doesn't matter if you saw it posted by a Nobel Laureate in medicine with 5 Olympic swimming medals and a debilitating case of hyperhidrosis, it simply isn’t true given what we know about how the human body works.
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  #18  
Old 08-24-2006, 05:39 AM
Edward The Head Edward The Head is online now
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The internet if full of idiots. I think those are words to live by. It doesn't matter if you saw it posted by a Nobel Laureate in medicine with 5 Olympic swimming medals and a debilitating case of hyperhidrosis, it simply isnít true given what we know about how the human body works.[/QUOTE]

I never said I believed them, I've only said I've seen it said that swimming is a poor way of losing weight. I've seen it in health books, swimming magazines, and even had doctors tell me this.
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  #19  
Old 08-24-2006, 07:29 AM
CC CC is offline
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by the way....

I teach university courses. When we were discussing misconceptions, I had a student tell me that her doctor told her that blood in veins is blue and blood in arteries is red. I didn't believe her 100% but I didn't totally doubt her. If she is correct, she has illustrated to me that doctors not only err in their diagonoses, but in their basic understanding of the human body, a misconception that I had held for some time, myself.
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  #20  
Old 08-24-2006, 05:46 PM
Will Repair Will Repair is offline
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Would it not be that swimming does not create weight loss because you are exchanging fat for muscle? (Walking would create weight loss because it is a common exercise and your walking muscles are already big enough.)

P.S. You sweat during a shower also (if the water is hot.)
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  #21  
Old 08-24-2006, 07:16 PM
CC CC is offline
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No, no, no. That is a common misconception, in fact. You are not exchanging fat for muscle. You are using up fat. It's no different from walking. You use calories of energy to do the work of moving yourself along swimming or walking. You require calories of energy in the food you eat. If they are in balance, you don't lose or gain weight. If one is greater than the other, you are not in balance. If you expend more energy than you take in, you lose weight because some of that energy has to come from that which you have in storage, i.e. fat. If you expend less energy than you take in, you place some of your intake in storage whether you want to or not and you gain weight, as that storage system is called body fat. The type of exercise you do is immaterial. You use energy to do it, and you take that energy from the food you have eaten.
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  #22  
Old 08-24-2006, 07:41 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Speaking from my own experience, I have lost weight since I started swimming, and Ivylad said he noticed my legs were getting firmer. Before I was doing the stairs or the ellipses or the treadmill, but I've noticed that from the second I get in the pool and start swimming, my heart rate goes up. My endurance is getting better, in that I don't have to rest after every lap anymore, and I have lost weight.

I do the breast (?) stroke, the one where you are face down in the water and swimming with your arms going over your head, turning for a breath after your arm goes over, then I do one exercise I made up myself...I lie on my back, put my arms out to my side so I make a T, and kick with my legs.
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  #23  
Old 08-24-2006, 08:31 PM
Edward The Head Edward The Head is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CC
You use calories of energy to do the work of moving yourself along swimming or walking. You require calories of energy in the food you eat. If they are in balance, you don't lose or gain weight. If one is greater than the other, you are not in balance. If you expend more energy than you take in, you lose weight because some of that energy has to come from that which you have in storage, i.e. fat. If you expend less energy than you take in, you place some of your intake in storage whether you want to or not and you gain weight, as that storage system is called body fat. The type of exercise you do is immaterial.
Except I think what happens, and the one cite I had kind of goes into this, people think, "well I swam for 30 minutes so that's a good workout". When in reality they haven't done much. It's a bit like me walking for 30 minutes thinking I've used the same amount of energy as running for the same 30 minutes. The majority of people who swim are not very efficient so they think they are running when they are walking, if that makes sense. They also said in the cite that some people tend to eat more after swimming then they do other exercises.

As for the OP, I asked around tonight at practice and everyone said they do sweat during practice. I know I was since I was looking to see if I did.
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  #24  
Old 08-24-2006, 09:46 PM
Rhubarb Rhubarb is offline
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<snip>
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivylass
I do the breast (?) stroke, the one where you are face down in the water and swimming with your arms going over your head, turning for a breath after your arm goes over, ...
Fhat's called freestyle. The breaststroke is where your hands stay underwater and they move together from your breast, out ahead of you and then out to the side and down and back up again (it's easier to demonstrate than to describe.) This stroke is meant to be done with a frog-kick. It was my least favorite stroke.
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  #25  
Old 08-24-2006, 10:46 PM
Lightray Lightray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhubarb
Fhat's called freestyle. The breaststroke is where your hands stay underwater and they move together from your breast, out ahead of you and then out to the side and down and back up again (it's easier to demonstrate than to describe.) This stroke is meant to be done with a frog-kick. It was my least favorite stroke.
Freestyle actually indicates that you can use any ol' style stroke that you want -- provided you're not swimming an event where you use the same (regulated) stroke (i.e., you can't sub in butterfly in a medely relay, because there's already a butterfly leg).

That's actually the crawl stroke -- which seems to now be the "front crawl", although we used to still refer to it as the "American crawl" (as opposed to the "Australian crawl", or the "Tarzan").

For completeness, here's wikipedia's bit on breaststroke (which used to be my favorite stroke, before my knees went kerflooey).
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  #26  
Old 08-25-2006, 06:42 AM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhubarb
<snip>
Fhat's called freestyle. The breaststroke is where your hands stay underwater and they move together from your breast, out ahead of you and then out to the side and down and back up again (it's easier to demonstrate than to describe.) This stroke is meant to be done with a frog-kick. It was my least favorite stroke.
I know which one you're talking about. I guess I'm doing the crawl.
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  #27  
Old 08-25-2006, 07:34 AM
Edward The Head Edward The Head is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ivylass
I know which one you're talking about. I guess I'm doing the crawl.
That's what it sounds like to me as well. If you want a good ab workout you can try this. Lie on your back, with your legs together kick up with your hips. You press up with your hips and down through your legs. This really works the abs and will probably burn like hell every time you do it. It's just an upside down dolphin kick. Also if you want a better pull, make sure your thumb brushes by your hip, this insures you get a full arm pull.
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  #28  
Old 08-26-2006, 03:52 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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I'll try it...thanks!
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