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  #1  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:32 AM
adammash adammash is offline
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Why can't I see the Magic Eye 3D illusions??

Why is it that I have never been able to see the 3D images within those damn Magic Eye books? Is this a giant hoax? A conspiracy to drive half of the world's population to insanity?? Do these images actually exsit??? TELL ME!!
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  #2  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:36 AM
Argent Towers Argent Towers is offline
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I can't see them, for the life of me. And I have years of experience in visual arts.
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  #3  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:36 AM
Q.E.D. Q.E.D. is offline
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I can see them just fine, but I know a lot of people who have trouble with them. The technique can be a little tricky to master, but these tips should help get you started.
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  #4  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:01 AM
x-ray vision x-ray vision is offline
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Try this:

Click on this link:
http://www.magiceye.com/gallery/081706s.html

Bring your head so close to your monitor, that your eyes are only about three inches from the screen. You'll be so close, that the image of the peanuts should already appear blurry. Slowly pull yourself away from the screen (but not too slowly) while keeping the image blurry, and you should start seeing a 3D image that you can now focus on.
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  #5  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:15 AM
Zoe Zoe is offline
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Is it possible that you do not have true binocular vision?
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  #6  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:28 AM
Fern Forest Fern Forest is offline
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I remember when I first saw one. In GAMES magazine way back when, in the late 80s I believe. It was only two small black and white image only about 4 square inches total each. One was a cube and the other a sphere. They were incredibly sharp. The images were just so much more there then any other one I've ever seen since.

So I'd try one of those. They should be your best bet.
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  #7  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:35 AM
Achren Achren is offline
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I can only see them with uncorrected vision. If my contacts or glasses are in/on I can't see anything.
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  #8  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:35 AM
oy vay oy vay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe
Is it possible that you do not have true binocular vision?
Let me second this. I have no depth perception and can't see em either. I do however one eye that's good for distance and for close up. Which makes for clear vision cause I subconsciously switch between them, not depth perception
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  #9  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:59 AM
jellyblue jellyblue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray vision
Try this:

Click on this link:
http://www.magiceye.com/gallery/081706s.html

Bring your head so close to your monitor, that your eyes are only about three inches from the screen. You'll be so close, that the image of the peanuts should already appear blurry. Slowly pull yourself away from the screen (but not too slowly) while keeping the image blurry, and you should start seeing a 3D image that you can now focus on.
I can do the Finger Hotdog Thing, but I can't see any of the effects on this site . Those things drive me crazy. Now I'm worried...Besides this, how can you tell if you have no binocular vision? Is this why I fall down a lot and hate walking down stairs? ::angst::
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  #10  
Old 10-02-2006, 02:09 AM
Hunter Hawk Hunter Hawk is offline
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It's not so much that people don't have "true binocular vision", but different folks have different levels of ability at depth perception--for example, that's one of the things you need to screen subjects for in certain types of research on vision. It's just one of those weirdnesses of the human body like how your pinnae affect your ability at auditory localization.

So if you can't see those Magic Eye images even after trying the tips & tricks, I'm afraid you'll probably have to just accept the fact that you're not gonna see them.
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  #11  
Old 10-02-2006, 05:49 AM
twickster twickster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray vision
Try this:
... Slowly pull yourself away from the screen (but not too slowly) while keeping the image blurry, and you should start seeing a 3D image that you can now focus on.
See, that's exactly the problem -- at a certain distance, my eyes refocus, whether I want them to or no, so I can't just "keep the image blurry."

I'm another one for whom they just don't work.
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  #12  
Old 10-02-2006, 05:55 AM
Surok Surok is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray vision
Try this:

Click on this link:
http://www.magiceye.com/gallery/081706s.html

Bring your head so close to your monitor, that your eyes are only about three inches from the screen. You'll be so close, that the image of the peanuts should already appear blurry. Slowly pull yourself away from the screen (but not too slowly) while keeping the image blurry, and you should start seeing a 3D image that you can now focus on.

All I get is a bunch of blurry peanuts. Which also look like maggots.

I'm with you, adamash and all the others on this thread who can't see these things.

But I think, having spent around 10 years trying, I'll probably resign myself to living with it. There are far worse handicaps to have.
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  #13  
Old 10-02-2006, 05:58 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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I don't have true binocular vision (I have one very dominant eye) and I could never see the blasted things -- until one time I managed to see one on the web. It was a teapot, as I recall. It was pretty neat, and actually much more 3D than the real world.

In fact, I sometimes wonder if I actually see the world in 3D like other people do -- I can't quite understand the point of 3D cinema because normal films are just as 3D as the real world!

Anyway, on the Magic Eye things - don't give up, you might see one eventually. I have never managed it again, though, so it is clearly not a case of learning the "knack".
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  #14  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:05 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray vision
Try this:

Click on this link:
http://www.magiceye.com/gallery/081706s.html
Well hey - that is the second one of those things EVER that I managed to see! My eyes are watering like hell, and as soon as I can see the image I find myself trying to focus on it and it disappears, but I did actually see it for a few seconds. Cool!
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  #15  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:09 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twickster
See, that's exactly the problem -- at a certain distance, my eyes refocus, whether I want them to or no, so I can't just "keep the image blurry."

I'm another one for whom they just don't work.
Toss me in as another one. Never in my life have I been able to make those things work.

"Brenda?"
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  #16  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:18 AM
Baldwin Baldwin is offline
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Another strabismic dude here. If my eyes simply crossed, at least they'd converge at some point -- but my left (dominant) eye looks up and to the right relative to my right eye, so the lines of vision never intersect.

The peanut picture presented as an example seems to be simply a stereoscopic image -- to pictures of the same thing taken from slight different positions. But what about those "magic eye" pictures that just look like a jumble? How do those work?
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  #17  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:24 AM
Jman Jman is offline
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I had a very cool shipwreck magic eye poster when I was younger. Very cool. The first time I saw one, it took me about 3 minutes before I could see the image. After having a poster on my wall for a few years, I got to a point where I could refocus my eyes on the hidden image instantly, from any distance. That was cool.
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  #18  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:29 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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I can see them fine, but Pepper Mill can't, and I suspectv she thinks that all us Magic Eye -watchers are conspiring against her. Our daughter, MilliCal, can't see them either.

I tried making her a set of special magic Eye viewers that used a wedge prism to shift one image directly ahead, so she wouldn't have to cross her eyes or trying to stare past the image, but it doesn't help. Heck, it doesn't help me, and I can see the darned things.
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  #19  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:44 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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I've always wanted to frame a bunch of random dots and name it "Emporer's new clothes" and see if anyone got it.
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  #20  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:48 AM
BiblioCat BiblioCat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray vision
Nope, I'm not getting it either. As I pull my head back, I sort of think I see something, but then it's just blurry peanuts again. I've never been able to see the Magic Eye pictures.
It is a conspiracy, CalMeacham.
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  #21  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:49 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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I've always wanted to frame a bunch of random dots and name it "Emporer's new clothes" and see if anyone got it.
Right after the Magic Eye posters started coming out in the early 90s, somebody made up a poster that looked like it was "Magic Eye", but, in fact, it wasn't anything. It was supposed to drive your Magic Eye friends nuts.



Myself, I always wanted to come up with a phtograph or drawing of a Shingle Factory Exploding, so I could call it "Nude Descending a Staircase".
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  #22  
Old 10-02-2006, 06:54 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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From the FAQs:
Quote:
Can anyone see a Magic Eye image?

DEPTH PERCEPTION depends on having two eyes. Most people who have depth perception can see a Magic Eye image. People with impaired depth perception or people who have one eye which is extremely dominant (as in amblyopia) will have more difficulty seeing the image. If you are having trouble, feel free to e-mail us. We can suggest several different methods to give you the best chance to see 3D.
It's been a few years since I've looked at Magic Eye images, and when I clicked on the link my eyes were blurry from just getting out of bed. So it took me a minute to get the linked one. Once I did it though, the others came nearly instantly.
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  #23  
Old 10-02-2006, 07:16 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Erm... my binocular vision is fine, thanks. I'm told (by my optometrist) that my problem is that my vision is too good, since I have to be pretty much eating the paper by the time things go out of focus.

Dunnow if he said that to make me feel good, but from how he laughed and his claims that his brother has the same problem (confirmed by brother), it seems to be his best guess. And it did work at making me feel good.
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  #24  
Old 10-02-2006, 08:46 AM
SnakesCatLady SnakesCatLady is offline
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I can't see them either - I have no forward vision in my right eye (presumed ocular histoplasmosis). Those Magic Eye things used to drive me nuts - I would spend every Sunday with the comics section trying to see the darn thing.
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  #25  
Old 10-02-2006, 08:54 AM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Magic Eye images require you to do the opposite of crossing your eyes--make the angle between your eyes wider than you normally would to see something at the distance of the picture. That's why one of the tips is to "look past" the picture. An easier thing to do is to cross your eyes, which most people can do, but the picture is then the inverse--the stuff that's supposed to look farther now looks closer, and vice versa.

On further looks I see that this is basically a paraphrase of the tips in the link posted by QED, which is a very good explanation
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  #26  
Old 10-02-2006, 08:59 AM
FormerMarineGuy FormerMarineGuy is offline
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I am one who can not see them either but everyone in my family seems to be able to. I am considered legally color blind, could this be a reason why one can't make out these images?
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  #27  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:02 AM
Blaster Master Blaster Master is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava
Erm... my binocular vision is fine, thanks. I'm told (by my optometrist) that my problem is that my vision is too good, since I have to be pretty much eating the paper by the time things go out of focus.

Dunnow if he said that to make me feel good, but from how he laughed and his claims that his brother has the same problem (confirmed by brother), it seems to be his best guess. And it did work at making me feel good.
I don't buy this. I have excellent vision as well (better than 20/20), and don't have a problem seeing the images. Of course, it took me several hours of trying to get it the first time, but after that it almost becomes a reflex... I can get the same sort of effect from looking at any repeating pattern (of course, minus the castle, dinosaur, or whatever the hidden image in the artificial patterns).

Personally, I never found any of those "put your nose" on the paper things or "let your eyes go blurry" suggestions to be very helpful. I find that problem that most people have is they focus AT the paper. The point of focus is behind the paper. So, in a sense, your eyes are blurred, but only because you're looking behind the paper. All you have to do is focus at the point where the pattern overlaps itself. Its easier if you try simpler patterns...try looking at a tile wall (like your bathroom floor, shower wall, etc... smaller tiles are better), and try to make your eyes "go out of focus" to the point where you can make the tiles over lap and seem to come back into focus. I doubt that will be much help.

If you're still struggling, maybe this website will help. You can draw your own hidden design so you know exactly what you're looking for. http://www.flash-gear.com/stereo/
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  #28  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:02 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
Magic Eye images require you to do the opposite of crossing your eyes--make the angle between your eyes wider than you normally would to see something at the distance of the picture. That's why one of the tips is to "look past" the picture. An easier thing to do is to cross your eyes, which most people can do, but the picture is then the inverse--the stuff that's supposed to look farther now looks closer, and vice versa.

On further looks I see that this is basically a paraphrase of the tips in the link posted by QED, which is a very good explanation
Yes, but if you cross your eyes, you will still see something -- a pseudoscopic, "inside-out" image, which will both convince that something is, indeed, there, and which will give you a "target" to shoot for in seeing the real image.

My favorite "Magic Eye"-type image was of a vase, which when you viewed it in the cross-eyed fashion became two faces. It's a variation on that perceptual illusion that asks if you see two faces in profile or a vase, but in this case, depending upon which kind of view you used, you saw either a 3D vase or 3D faces. Extremely clever.
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  #29  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:04 AM
Trunk Trunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
I don't have true binocular vision (I have one very dominant eye) and I could never see the blasted things -- until one time I managed to see one on the web. It was a teapot, as I recall. It was pretty neat, and actually much more 3D than the real world.

In fact, I sometimes wonder if I actually see the world in 3D like other people do -- I can't quite understand the point of 3D cinema because normal films are just as 3D as the real world!
Whoa.

You probably don't. It sounds like a lot of people in this thread don't.

There was a fascinating article in the New Yorker 4-5 months back by Oliver Sacks about people who lack stereoscopic vision. This woman somehow was retrained to be able to see 3D and things started amazing her. . .like how the steering wheel in her car seemed to occupy the space between the dahboard and her.

But, IIRC, the way she described the world was like a movie screen. There are still a lot of visual clues as to depth, but it doesn't mean you see 3D properly.

I think you can google "stereoscopic test" to see if you have stereoscopic problems. I'm not so sure the magic eye is a proper test for that. (but maybe it is)
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  #30  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:06 AM
cormac262 cormac262 is offline
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I couldn't see them at first, and I tried a lot of the tricks that were mentioned in the tips (to no avail).

Here is the technique that finally worked for me:
- take a piece of clear glass large enough to cover the whole image. The protective glass from a picture frame works well.
- place the glass over the 3-d image
- look at the image straight on, from about 10 to 12 inches away
- Focus on your reflection in the glass, not the image itself.
- relax and move the image (plus glass) slowly closer or further by about an inch or so
- stay focused on your reflection, and (hopefully) the 3-d image will appear.

The trick is in getting your eyes to not focus on the image itself, but rather a bit in front of it. We're so trained to read off of pages, it's difficult to do. But once you get used to doing it with the glass, you will be able to do it without.

You're also in luck as all those Magic Eye books are in the bargain bin at the bookstores !
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  #31  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:40 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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I just had a look at the Magic Eye site, and this one stood out as being very easy to see, even for someone like me that thought they couldn't see them!

One question for experienced viewers though - is the background pattern supposed to "disappear" to make the hidden image easier to see? With the one I linked to above, I can see the shape easily, but the "clutter" of the pattern makes it hard to see any details.
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  #32  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:45 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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One more anecdote: my right eye is so dominant that the world looks the same as always to me when my left eye is covered. Needless to say, my stereoscopic vision bites. I get nothing out of Magic Eye images.
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  #33  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:50 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond
One more anecdote: my right eye is so dominant that the world looks the same as always to me when my left eye is covered. Needless to say, my stereoscopic vision bites. I get nothing out of Magic Eye images.
I'm the same, but with the other eye. If you hold a finger up in front of your face, close to your eyes, and let your vision go out of focus, do you get even a faint "ghost image" from the other eye? My left eye is the dominant one, but I still get a faint image from my right eye, which appears to the left of the main finger image.

If you get even a faint secondary image from your weak eye, then you might be able to see the image in that link I just posted: http://www.magiceye.com/gallery/083106s.html

It's by far the strongest Magic Eye image I've ever seen. (OK, so I've only ever managed to see three, but that one leapt out at me).
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  #34  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:53 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is online now
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I can almost always see the lighter ones, but that one is really hard and I can't see it. One of my eyes is dominant over the other one, but I didn't think it was that much.

Now that I flip through the site, I can't see any of those!
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  #35  
Old 10-02-2006, 09:58 AM
Excalibre Excalibre is offline
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Do those who can't see them understand the basics of how they work? The instructions revolving around shoving your face into the picture and backing away slowly don't really get at what you're actually doing. The images all have repeating vertical stripes (whether it's an actual image, as with the peanuts, or just staticky-looking dots.) The trick is to focus one eye on one stripe and the other eye on another other stripe, and the subtle differences between them are analyzed by your brain into images with depth, just like the slightly different views of objects in the real world are combined into a 3D image. It's probably easier to do it by crossing your eyes than by diverging them, if you're not used to it (but, as mentioned above, the image will be reversed back-to-front if you do that.)

My father doesn't have true binocular vision either - he had an untreated lazy eye as a kid, and when his eyes are both open, he only really sees from the right one. So he has no hope of seeing the magic eye pictures.
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  #36  
Old 10-02-2006, 10:08 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
I'm the same, but with the other eye. If you hold a finger up in front of your face, close to your eyes, and let your vision go out of focus, do you get even a faint "ghost image" from the other eye?
I used to when I was younger, but not anymore. I can only conciously "notice" what my left eye is seeing if my right eye is closed.
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  #37  
Old 10-02-2006, 10:10 AM
drewbert drewbert is offline
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I've been told by an opthamologist that as a result of my amblyopia, I will never see them without eye muscle surgery. (And by the way, just for the record, that ain't happenin'. Ick.)

I'm not sure which my dominant eye is - it sesems to me I can select which eye is dominant. Which is useful because one of them is more nearsighted than the other. I'm now using my right eye dominantly to look at my laptop. If I want to look at the TV across the room, I'm better off with (and automatically switch to) my left eye. Instant bifocals!
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  #38  
Old 10-02-2006, 10:16 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika
I can almost always see the lighter ones, but that one is really hard and I can't see it. One of my eyes is dominant over the other one, but I didn't think it was that much.

Now that I flip through the site, I can't see any of those!
That's odd -- I couldn't see any of the ones with lighter backgrounds, but the dark ones worked, or at least partially: I could vaguely see an area that was "closer" than the other parts, even if I couldn't work out what the image was meant to be.
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  #39  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:11 PM
BiblioCat BiblioCat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
I just had a look at the Magic Eye site, and this one stood out as being very easy to see, even for someone like me that thought they couldn't see them!
Gah, I still can't see it. What am I supposed to be seeing, anyway? If I knew what to look for, would that make it easier?

I'm very nearsighted, but not colorblind. I have no idea if I have stereoscopic vision or not.
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  #40  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:23 PM
tremorviolet tremorviolet is offline
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Originally Posted by BiblioCat
Gah, I still can't see it. What am I supposed to be seeing, anyway? If I knew what to look for, would that make it easier?

I'm very nearsighted, but not colorblind. I have no idea if I have stereoscopic vision or not.
That one's a car, vaguely 1950's looking. It's pointing towards the right and we see the side. There's something on the roof, maybe it's a cop car? No, wait, I guess it's supposed to be a checkered cab. When you finally see the 3-d thing, it looks like it was molded out of clay and then covered with whatever the background image is. They usually float in front of the back ground (which is usually flat but can be contoured). It's weird when you get it because it feels like you can actually look around inside the picture, just as if it was something framed in a box.

Once I got the knack, I could see almost all of them easily. I'm pretty good at unfocusing my eyes tho', I tend to just kinda unfocus and glaze over whenever I'm tired anyway and I think the habit helps.
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  #41  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:31 PM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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If you click on the image, it shows you the "hidden image". It's a taxi cab.
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  #42  
Old 10-02-2006, 12:33 PM
Sutremaine Sutremaine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookingWithGas
An easier thing to do is to cross your eyes, which most people can do, but the picture is then the inverse--the stuff that's supposed to look farther now looks closer, and vice versa.
I've been doing it wrong the whole time? No wonder the greyscale 'answer' pics never made any sense.
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  #43  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:37 PM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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I have otherwise perfect uncorrected vision, but these things don't work for me. Given all of the tutorial tips people suggest, I can catch a very fleeting blurry image, assuming my eyes haven't watered up too greatly, which I can never hold for more than a second. And I'm told that these are supposed to be clear images, but the best I can get is horribly fuzzy in that "kind of looks like a boat in a Rorscach test kind of way".

I think it may be a brain problem for me, that my brain never is able to or wants to "dial in" to this out-of-focus image. In fact, my brain quite vehemently tells me that the whole attempt is a bad idea, by giving me a pounding headache to deter me from trying such a stupid thing again.
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  #44  
Old 10-02-2006, 02:20 PM
rowrrbazzle rowrrbazzle is offline
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Here's a simplified pattern that illustrates the Magic Eye principle. I wonder if those who can't see Magic Eye can see the depth in this:
Code:
N    N    N    N    N    N    N
F     F     F     F     F     F
E    E    E    E    E    E    E
A     A     A     A     A     A
A    A    A    A    A    A    A    
R     R     R     R     R     R 
R    R    R    R    R    R    R
Merge the repeated letters with slightly crossed eyes (try looking at the tip of your nose), and you will see the word "FAR" an inch or two in front of the screen and the word "NEAR" farther away. You can verify this by moving your finger to a position where you see it as one finger.

The Magic Eye technique is to un-cross your eyes by using techniques described above. If you succeed, you'll see that the above pattern now has the word "FAR" farther away than the word "NEAR".
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  #45  
Old 10-02-2006, 02:40 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is online now
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Hee. I think I just sprained an eyeball trying to see the various ones people posted.

Nothing.

I have horrible eyesight, nearsightedness plus astigmatism, though I don't know anything about stereoscopicness.
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  #46  
Old 10-02-2006, 02:45 PM
yabob yabob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rowrrbazzle
Here's a simplified pattern that illustrates the Magic Eye principle. I wonder if those who can't see Magic Eye can see the depth in this:
Code:
N    N    N    N    N    N    N
F     F     F     F     F     F
E    E    E    E    E    E    E
A     A     A     A     A     A
A    A    A    A    A    A    A    
R     R     R     R     R     R 
R    R    R    R    R    R    R
Merge the repeated letters with slightly crossed eyes (try looking at the tip of your nose), and you will see the word "FAR" an inch or two in front of the screen and the word "NEAR" farther away. You can verify this by moving your finger to a position where you see it as one finger.

The Magic Eye technique is to un-cross your eyes by using techniques described above. If you succeed, you'll see that the above pattern now has the word "FAR" farther away than the word "NEAR".
Yeah, I can make your example work in the "crossed eyes" direction, as I can the "magic eye" things, and get a reversed image, which can be hard to figure out. I've never been able to make them work the "right" way. If that's the easier way to do it, with more of the population naturally able to cross their eyes than uncross them, why don't they just prepare them that way, and direct you to look at them crosseyed in the first place? Or at least give you two versions, one reversed for crosseyed viewing.
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  #47  
Old 10-02-2006, 04:27 PM
susan susan is offline
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I can't see the divergent ones. I can see the convergent ones by crossing my eyes.
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Old 10-02-2006, 04:33 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Quote:
If that's the easier way to do it, with more of the population naturally able to cross their eyes than uncross them, why don't they just prepare them that way, and direct you to look at them crosseyed in the first place?
It's not the easier way for most of the population, just the easier way for that portion of the population that can't see them the normal way. Myself, I have a very difficult time crossing my eyes, but I've been deliberately doubling my vision and "merging" chain-link fences, tiles, etc. for as long as I can remember, by diverging my eyes. It's also a useful trick for those "Find the difference between these pictures" puzzles: If you can overlap the images, the differences jump out at you.

To those who can't see these, can you see 3-d images in a Viewmaster, or equivalent stereoscope? If not, then it's something wrong with your depth perception (a strongly dominent eye, or different processing in the brain, or whatever).
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  #49  
Old 10-02-2006, 05:09 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos
To those who can't see these, can you see 3-d images in a Viewmaster, or equivalent stereoscope? If not, then it's something wrong with your depth perception (a strongly dominent eye, or different processing in the brain, or whatever).
Yes, I have no problem with a Viewmaster. Love them.
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  #50  
Old 10-02-2006, 05:49 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos
To those who can't see these, can you see 3-d images in a Viewmaster, or equivalent stereoscope? If not, then it's something wrong with your depth perception (a strongly dominent eye, or different processing in the brain, or whatever).
Nope ... never even noticed they were supposed to be 3-D
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