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  #1  
Old 10-09-2006, 11:16 PM
diggleblop diggleblop is offline
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Can inmates receive prescribed narcotics in jail?

If I am under a Doctor's care in Maryland and receiving 120Qty/40mg Oxycontin a month, then I get in trouble and end up in jail. Would I still receive my meds in jail or is it strictly no narcotic medication allowed in jail whatsoever. Do they have to give them to you or not?
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  #2  
Old 10-09-2006, 11:17 PM
overeasy4 overeasy4 is offline
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I've known terminally ill people who were not given their prescribed medicine in jail. They sued and lost.
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  #3  
Old 10-09-2006, 11:27 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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According to our resident Prison Doper Doc, Qadgop the Mercotan, all of a prisoner's medical needs must be met, including narcotic pain killers if that's the best thing for the job. There would very likely be restrictions on how and when the meds are administered (like you might have to go to the infirmary every few hours and get one dose at a time), but if you need it medically, you will get it.

And hopefully, since I've used his full username and I think I even spelled it correctly this time, he'll be in to verify or clarify if he does a vanity search.
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  #4  
Old 10-10-2006, 12:48 AM
tashabot tashabot is offline
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Technically you should, yes. In fact, it's federally mandated - refusing to give medical service that is vitally needed is, I believe, considered cruel and unusual punishment.

However, just to say it's the law doesn't mean it happens. There's a prison out in Lovelock, an hour or so drive from here, where inmates routinely don't get their medicine. There isn't really any reason for it, either, except for maybe laziness. One guy went into diabetic shock because they wouldn't give him his insulin for his extreme diabetes, and almost died. Still, no one does anything.

~Tasha
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  #5  
Old 10-10-2006, 12:53 AM
overeasy4 overeasy4 is offline
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It happens more than people realize.
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Old 10-10-2006, 01:41 AM
Snooooopy Snooooopy is offline
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I have been diagnosed with an acute inability to par-tay. Give me my prescribed narcotics!
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  #7  
Old 10-10-2006, 06:09 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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Your supposed to get your medical treatment, but like all institutions some will provide badly for implimentation. Inmates normaly go to the medical area and take the medicines. Inmates on narcotics have been forced to throw up the medicine by other inmates to get the narcotics.
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  #8  
Old 10-10-2006, 06:13 AM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is online now
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I have a friend who worked as the nurse in the County Jail. One of her jobs was dispensing all medications that prisoners were taking.

When prisoners entered the jail, any medications they had were taken away. Including everything from prescription medicines to simple asprin or cough drops. The medications (legal ones only; illegal ones were confiscated) were placed in a big nurses cart, with separate compartments for each prisoner.

Twice per 8-hour shift, she wheeled that cart around to each cellblock, and dispensed medications to the prisoners. They were required to take the medicine right then, in her presence. She gave all medications, even to prisoners who normally took their own medication, like diabetics who gave themselves insulin or asthma patients who had inhalers. Even for something as commonplace as a headache, a prisoner could not just take an asprin -- they had to ask to see the nurse, and she would dispense an asprin tablet to them if she felt they needed it.

For prescription medications, they had to be in the original drugstore bottle with the patients name on it. If the prisoner had taken some out of that bottle and put them in a pocket-sized pillbox, he would not be allowed to take them until the jail had proof that they had been prescribed for him. Either a family member bringing in the original drugstore bottle, or the doctors prescription. If he didn't have his medications on him at the time of his arrest, again he had to get someone to bring them to the jail for him. Only in extreme life-threatening situations would the jail order a supply from the County Hospital down the street.

This was a big job, since there were 750-1000 prisoners who she had to take care of. She was very careful to get prisoners their medications each day, because that was what her nurses training had taught her.

But she mentioned that some of the guards were not at all concerned, even commented that such medical care was 'coddling criminals'. Sometimes prisoners would ask to see the nurse with a medical problem, and some guards would refuse to let them see her. When she heard about this, she filed complaints against them, and the guards got in trouble for this.

Sometimes the prisoners got their medications a bit off their schedule, since she had the whole jail to deal with during her shift. But in general, she was a careful, caring nurse who treated them well.
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  #9  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:11 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Inmates are not allowed to bring any prescription medications in to prison with them. However, all medications, including narcotics, will be given to an inmate if they are prescribed to him. Some medications are just given to the inmates with instructions on how to take them. Other medications, such as narcotics, are given directly to the inmate from a nurse on a one by one basis. The inmate goes to the infirmary unit, the nurse hands him his medication and watchs him take it.
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  #10  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:14 AM
bump bump is offline
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Seems like Qadgop is just the guy to answer this one, seeing as he's a prison doctor and all.

<lights the Qadgop-Signal>
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  #11  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:58 AM
diggleblop diggleblop is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bump
Seems like Qadgop is just the guy to answer this one, seeing as he's a prison doctor and all.

<lights the Qadgop-Signal>

Agreed, especially since there are conflicting answers. I also wonder if a person is being prescribed oxycontin on the outside, would they be prescribed it on the inside? See, I have a friend who is a recovering cancer patient, takes oxycontin for extreme pain and is facing some time in a few months and he's worried about what might happen. Oxycontin is the only thing that really works for him.
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:59 AM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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In states like California where medicinal marijuana can inmates with legitimate prescriptions recieve it in state prisons? Afterall it's still illegal under federal law.
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:01 AM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overeasy4
It happens more than people realize.
Cite?
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  #14  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:03 AM
irishgirl irishgirl is offline
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If prisoners are being forced to regurgitate pills, or are "fake taking" in order to stockpile narcotics, there are simple steps that could be taken to overcome that. A nurse/doctor/health care worker could administer their medication by subcutaneous, IM or IV injection rather than an oral tablet, for example, or they could take a liquid preparation that is harder to fake swallow.

You can get painkillers in other formulations than oral tablets- abuse of the system is not a good reason to deprive someone of adequate pain relief, especially when two minutes thinking could come up with a solution.
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  #15  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:55 AM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overeasy4
It happens more than people realize.
Welcome to the boards, overeasy4!

One of the things that makes The Straight Dope Message Board (SDMB) fairly unique among message boards is that we like to hold ourselves to pretty high standards of evidence when answering factual questions. Sometimes anecdotes ("I have a friend who...." or "This one time I...") are the only way to answer a question. Usually those kinds of questions are in the section of the board called "In My Humble Opinion". Generally (and there are always exceptions), in this part of the board, "General Questions", we are expected to back up our claims with citations from reputable, unbiased sources like peer-reviewed articles, newpaper stories or other statistical sources of information.

This question in particular is one of policy. While the answers may vary in different prisons, there is an actual, factual answer to the question, and it's best answered by actual prison doctors (granted, none of us can swear for sure that Qadop is an actual prison doc, but he's got a long history with no obvious contradictions that makes us believe his claim, and he's very well respected around here). One could also find the answer by linking to actual policy statements. If you know the policy isn't being followed in practice, then you could, for example, cite a newspaper article on medical care being withheld in prisons, or a state survey showing the percentage of patients prescribed narcotics inside prisons as compared to patients prescribed narcotics outside prison. Basically, some way to help us accept that your point is valid and factually accurate.

When adam yax wrote "cite?", he was asking you to back up your claim with data so we don't think you're some random nutjob who doesn't actually know anything.

Hope this is helpful, and please don't think I'm trying to be harsh. I did the same thing back when I joined, and another Doper gave me basically the same post I did you. It helps sometimes to have the unwritten rules explained. See you 'round the Dope!
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  #16  
Old 10-10-2006, 11:45 AM
anson2995 anson2995 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diggleblop
If I am under a Doctor's care in Maryland and receiving 120Qty/40mg Oxycontin a month, then I get in trouble and end up in jail. Would I still receive my meds in jail or is it strictly no narcotic medication allowed in jail whatsoever. Do they have to give them to you or not?
If they are prescribed, then yes. In the federal prison system, each institution has a pharmacy on site. There are a number of restrictions on how medications are distributed (link to PDF of BOP policies). The Feds say that between sixty and eighty percent of their inmates have drug addiction issues, so managing prescriptions is an issue they take pretty seriously.

Policies and procedures can obviously differ in state and county facilities, and it's impossible to provide a specific answer without knowing the jurisdiction in question.
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2006, 06:31 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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I often prescribe narcotics to my patients, and they generally get them.

I tend to prescribe narcotic painkillers only for moderate to severe acute pain, and for malignant pain. I tend to not prescribe it for chronic non-malignant pain. That's a good rule of thumb for any physician, not just a prison physician.

Diversion is a problem. Other inmates shake down the patient for the med, ordering him to cheek it rather than swallow it, and threaten consequences if he tells officers about his behavior. Some inmates discover they can sell their dose. Some officers have been known to divert the medication, too. Addiction affects more folks than just inmates.

On the prisoner units, the "controlled" medicines are distributed at set times by officers. The officers do not dispense the medication, they just make it available to the inmate for them to take at the times and dosages prescribed. The officers report it to us if an inmate refuses to take controlled meds as ordered.

The "controlled" medicines are not just the ones with the big red "C" on them which are regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration, they're also the psychiatric drugs, meds to prevent seizures, meds to treat HIV, TB, and a few other things too.

The officers hate handing out meds, and I don't blame them. We're trying to get medically trained folks to do the job, but it's a huge one, and adding personnel would cost a lot of money.

If a drug is not controlled (like HCTZ for high blood pressure, indocin for pain), the inmate keeps these meds in his cell, and is expected to take them appropriately.

Giving the medication in liquid form or injectable form or making them come down to the nurses station to be witnessed taking it can be done, but it's a hassle. We've got a finite staff, stretched thin, to do the job that needs doing.

Perhaps this spring, at our next open house, I'll have a spot or two open on my guest list and make an invitation for a doper or two to see where I work.
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2006, 06:34 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Oh, and just because you enter my prison with a documented history of taking Oxycontin 80 three times a day with valium 20 three times a day, don't expect me to not change your medications to what I feel is appropriate, once I've assessed you. Once you're in my institution, I and my minions are your doctor, not the gullible guy you've been seeing for your back pain.

If you're on that med for pancreatic cancer, you can depend on getting equivalent doses of similar potent narcotic analgesics for me at need. But if you're on it for chronic musculo-skeletal low back pain, we'll be exploring alternate treatment plans.
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  #19  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:06 PM
diggleblop diggleblop is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan
If you're on that med for pancreatic cancer, you can depend on getting equivalent doses of similar potent narcotic analgesics for me at need. But if you're on it for chronic musculo-skeletal low back pain, we'll be exploring alternate treatment plans.

Understandable, but what would you do so the patient doesn't have withdrawl? Because going from taking say... four 40mg Oxycontin a day to nothing is pretty rough on that patient. Would you slowly decrease his dose or just give him something like 10 mg Percocet, then go down to something even lighter after a few weeks?
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  #20  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:12 PM
overeasy4 overeasy4 is offline
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In 1991, in Cleveland Ohio's county jail, at least 10 aids inmates who were on azt and other drugs were not given them at all over a period of a month. They brought a joint lawsuit and lost. I don't know if I could find it online or search for it, but I will try.
I also knew a woman who was locked up for 2 months in the same place and denied her prescription medication. I'm not making these up.
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  #21  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:34 PM
betenoir betenoir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diggleblop
Understandable, but what would you do so the patient doesn't have withdrawl? Because going from taking say... four 40mg Oxycontin a day to nothing is pretty rough on that patient. Would you slowly decrease his dose or just give him something like 10 mg Percocet, then go down to something even lighter after a few weeks?
I'm wondering if they'd be given methadone. For that matter, can an addict (to illegal narcotics) get methadone in prison?
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  #22  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:51 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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In 1991, in Cleveland Ohio's county jail, at least 10 aids inmates who were on azt and other drugs were not given them at all over a period of a month. They brought a joint lawsuit and lost. I don't know if I could find it online or search for it, but I will try.

I also knew a woman who was locked up for 2 months in the same place and denied her prescription medication. I'm not making these up.
In 1991 (and maybe still in 2006) AZT was considered an experimental treatment for AIDS and one which was known to have serious side-effects. Many prison systems prohibit the use of inmates in experimatental medical tests.

Your second example is so vague I can't really address it except to note that data is not the plural of anecdote.
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  #23  
Old 10-11-2006, 12:14 AM
elfbabe elfbabe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot
none of us can swear for sure that Qadop is an actual prison doc
I can!

Quote:
Originally Posted by overeasy4
I also knew a woman who was locked up for 2 months in the same place and denied her prescription medication. I'm not making these up.
Sure, but... when? Where? What drug?
It's not that everybody thinks you're making it up, it's just that we need more context for it to be at all useful.
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  #24  
Old 10-11-2006, 12:15 AM
overeasy4 overeasy4 is offline
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She was in June to August. I will call and ask her what drug she hadn't received.
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  #25  
Old 10-11-2006, 04:22 AM
irishgirl irishgirl is offline
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QtM- I have the utmost respect for you, and I know you have issues with prescribing strong painkillers for non-malignant pain.

My question is, if the only thing that makes you suspect dependence issues are high doses of pain medication (rather than, say, a history of showing up at multiple hospitals seeking opiates for fictitious ailments, or a conviction for buying opiates illegally), and the patient appears to function normally on their current regime, is it always appropriate to change it, just because you don't like prescribing narcotics?

Considering, especially that other pain medications have their own side effects (GI bleeding with NSAIDS, Cardio-vascular complications with COX-2), it is estimated in the UK alone that several hundred people die every year from GI bleeding directly related to NSAID use, while there are very few deaths directly linked to prescription opiate dependence.
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  #26  
Old 10-11-2006, 09:00 AM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Originally Posted by elfbabe
I can!


I was going to mention you as the only one on the board who could absolutely, without a doubt vouch for QtM, being his daughter and all, but I thought I might be hauled away by the parenthetical police for overuse of punctuation marks!

'Sides, there is always the very very slim chance that you're a sock or just part of the Matrix or Doc Merc's stalker or my grandmother...then again, I could be Weird Al, and you'd never know!
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  #27  
Old 10-11-2006, 10:30 AM
psychonaut psychonaut is offline
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Originally Posted by irishgirl
If prisoners are being forced to regurgitate pills, or are "fake taking" in order to stockpile narcotics, there are simple steps that could be taken to overcome that. A nurse/doctor/health care worker could administer their medication by subcutaneous, IM or IV injection rather than an oral tablet, for example…
What makes you think that injections, with all the paraphernalia and personnel they require, are a "simple" alternative to pills? Manpower issues aside, having a sharp object anywhere near an uncooperative and possibly violent inmate seems to be inviting many more problems than it would solve.
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  #28  
Old 10-11-2006, 11:07 AM
Lissa Lissa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan
I
On the prisoner units, the "controlled" medicines are distributed at set times by officers. The officers do not dispense the medication, they just make it available to the inmate for them to take at the times and dosages prescribed. The officers report it to us if an inmate refuses to take controlled meds as ordered.

<snip>

If a drug is not controlled (like HCTZ for high blood pressure, indocin for pain), the inmate keeps these meds in his cell, and is expected to take them appropriately.
Things in your institution are run very differently from the one in which my husband works. In his prison (medium security), all meds are dispensed by medical personel and inmates are not allowed to have any kind of medication in their posession. It was the same when he worked at SuperMax. Staff aren't even allowed to have their own medications on the premisis. (One of my husband's diabetic co-workers has to keep his insulin in a cooler in his car and give himself his shots in the parking lot.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by irishgirl
If prisoners are being forced to regurgitate pills, or are "fake taking" in order to stockpile narcotics, there are simple steps that could be taken to overcome that. A nurse/doctor/health care worker could administer their medication by subcutaneous, IM or IV injection rather than an oral tablet, for example, or they could take a liquid preparation that is harder to fake swallow.

You can get painkillers in other formulations than oral tablets- abuse of the system is not a good reason to deprive someone of adequate pain relief, especially when two minutes thinking could come up with a solution.
It's not always that simple. At least in my state, prison medical services are run sort of like an HMO. There are medications which are approved and medications which aren't. It's possible that some medications might be approved in pill form but not in IV form and vice-versa. A doctor wanting to use a non-approved form of a medication would have to go before the board which supervises it and plead his case. If the reason was medically sound and justified the expense or change in policy, they might do it, but they generally don't change things because of nebulous reasons like a pill might be puked up.

If an inmate was concerned he would be forced to vomit, all he would have to do is ask to wait in the medical area until the pill had dissolved. Most prison staff would have no problem with letting an inmate sit in a chair outside their office for a little while.

An IV comes with its own set of problems. Infection is a big problem in some institutions, and you also have to worry about collapsed veins and the like. And who wants the pain of getting an IV every day? It'd also be more expensive because of the supplies needed and staff time to monitor the IV drip.
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  #29  
Old 10-11-2006, 05:12 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diggleblop
Understandable, but what would you do so the patient doesn't have withdrawl? Because going from taking say... four 40mg Oxycontin a day to nothing is pretty rough on that patient. Would you slowly decrease his dose or just give him something like 10 mg Percocet, then go down to something even lighter after a few weeks?
I've got no problems with tapering meds given for pain. I do it all the time.
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:14 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Originally Posted by betenoir
I'm wondering if they'd be given methadone. For that matter, can an addict (to illegal narcotics) get methadone in prison?
Methadone is an excellent long-acting narcotic to prescribe for pain. I prescribe it fairly often.

Neither I nor my establishment are licensed to prescribe methadone to maintain an opiate addiction nor detox someone from opiates. That's a whole 'nother certification.
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:19 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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What makes you think that injections, with all the paraphernalia and personnel they require, are a "simple" alternative to pills? Manpower issues aside, having a sharp object anywhere near an uncooperative and possibly violent inmate seems to be inviting many more problems than it would solve.
Tell me about it. I once wrote a manual for the procedures of inventorying, using, and disposing of syringes.
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:22 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Things in your institution are run very differently from the one in which my husband works. In his prison (medium security), all meds are dispensed by medical personel and inmates are not allowed to have any kind of medication in their posession.
We're in between. All medications are handed out by medical personnel (although I can remember dispensing medications as an officer twenty years ago). But we do issue some medications to inmates for them to keep and take themselves.
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:25 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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She was in June to August. I will call and ask her what drug she hadn't received.
Okay. But keep in mind that during those same three months I witnessed about 6000 inmates get their medications.
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:40 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irishgirl
QtM- I have the utmost respect for you, and I know you have issues with prescribing strong painkillers for non-malignant pain.

My question is, if the only thing that makes you suspect dependence issues are high doses of pain medication (rather than, say, a history of showing up at multiple hospitals seeking opiates for fictitious ailments, or a conviction for buying opiates illegally), and the patient appears to function normally on their current regime, is it always appropriate to change it, just because you don't like prescribing narcotics?

Considering, especially that other pain medications have their own side effects (GI bleeding with NSAIDS, Cardio-vascular complications with COX-2), it is estimated in the UK alone that several hundred people die every year from GI bleeding directly related to NSAID use, while there are very few deaths directly linked to prescription opiate dependence.
I believe that narcotics are never the first tool in my chronic non-malignant pain treatment toolbox, even if the patient has no history of addiction. I also believe that narcotics are relatively contra-indicated for the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain if the patient has a history of chemical dependency (drug addiction, alcoholism). Some folks feel that they're absolutely contra-indicated in those circumstances. I'm not willing to go that far.

In the ordinary population, this means about 10% of patients will have a history of chemical dependency. In my population that number rises to about 70% by many estimates. So I really, really really defer using narcotics for chronic pain.

That doesn't mean I never use them. But before doing so, I need to have a thorough documentation of the patient's history and physical findings, study results, experiences with other treatment modalities, along with an idea of what the goal of treatment is, whether narcotics are utilized or not. And my goal is to improve function, not to eliminate pain, because frankly I'll never be able to do that for the vast majority of my patients.

So if I can get the patient able to ambulate better, function longer, rest better, participate more in ADLs with my treatment program, then I'm making progress. If I find that adding a narcotic at some point helps me accomplish those goals, I'll use them. But if the narcotic does not help me attain those goals then they'll be taken out of the mix. And if the patient violates our agreement and uses the narcotics inappropriately, they are unlikely to be continued.

As for patients who come in on narcotics, the only way to really assess them is to find out what their baseline is like off narcotics. Sometimes that can be done with old records, but oftentimes it can't. And frankly, I generally don't see folks functioning 'fine' on high dose narcotics for failed back surgery pain. They come in groggy, constipated, unable to function well, yet complaining they need more narcotics. Frankly, they function better when they're off the narcs in most cases.

And any treatment modality has risks and benefits. The NSAIDs can cause GI bleeding, APAP may lead to liver trouble, amitriptylene may aggravate certain cardiac problems, gabapentin may cause coordination trouble, tegretal may cause blood abnormalities, and so forth. So each must be weighed on the scale of risk vs. benefit.

It is difficult territory to navigate. And one battles a certain school of pain management thought that says any pain is the result of inadequate opiates. But my principles of pain management were learned from some top notch physiatrists, pain specialists, addictionists, internists, and anesthesiologists from across the country. And for the tough cases, I'll send the patient out to a pain specialist for their input. What I often get is "yeah, that's a tough case. You've already tried most things. Much of his behavior does seem to represent a drug-seeking attitude. Avoid short-acting narcotics like the plague, try some long-acting narcotics like methadone to a max dose of 100 mg a day, and if he doesn't get benefit from that, taper him off of it, and go with continued exercise, weight loss, and physical therapy. Good luck. I don't need to see him again".

As you can tell, I've given this topic a bit of thought in the past. In fact I have put together two powerpoint presentations that I give to physicians about chronic pain management in general and about the use of opiates in chronic pain treatment.

And now I'm newly certified and licensed to prescribe buprenorphine to maintain or detox an opiate addiction. I doubt I'll be maintaining many addictions (unless they've a short prison stay and came in on maintenance therapy) but it will be useful for helping me get some folks off their methadone maintenance.

That's just the tip of the iceberg for what I've learned about treating chronic pain. It is a specialty unto itself. But now since most insurance companies no longer pay much for chronic pain referrals, a lot of folks are getting out of the business. However, that's a whole 'nuther story.

I've rambled enough.
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:43 PM
Contrapuntal Contrapuntal is offline
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Originally Posted by WhyNot
I was going to mention you as the only one on the board who could absolutely, without a doubt vouch for QtM, being his daughter and all,
Fine. Who's gonna vouch for her? Or you, for that matter? For all I know you're the bastard child of Jerry Falwell and Phyllis Schaffley!
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  #36  
Old 10-11-2006, 05:54 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo
In 1991 (and maybe still in 2006) AZT was considered an experimental treatment for AIDS and one which was known to have serious side-effects. Many prison systems prohibit the use of inmates in experimatental medical tests.
On the contrary, not only was AZT FDA-approved in 1987 for treatment of HIV, it was also the first drug approved for this purpose. I'd be exceedingly surprised if GSK was still spending money to test AZT for FDA approval over 2 decades after development. I can think of over 20 meds (some of which are combinations of other meds, mind you) that are FDA-approved for HIV treatment.
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  #37  
Old 10-11-2006, 06:17 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overeasy4
In 1991, in Cleveland Ohio's county jail, at least 10 aids inmates who were on azt and other drugs were not given them at all over a period of a month. They brought a joint lawsuit and lost. I don't know if I could find it online or search for it, but I will try.
I also knew a woman who was locked up for 2 months in the same place and denied her prescription medication. I'm not making these up.
County jail policy varies from one county to the next. I'm no expert on what goes on in jails, but I do see a lot of different practices from different sites.

Some jails will allow a patient to take whatever medications his own doctors are prescribing, if the prescriptions are verified, and a friend or family member brings it in. Some don't allow any outside meds, but turn over the medical care to the jail doctor, who may or may not work off of a formulary. Some jails frankly seem to not allow anything.
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  #38  
Old 10-11-2006, 06:27 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is online now
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Join Date: Jul 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot


I was going to mention you as the only one on the board who could absolutely, without a doubt vouch for QtM, being his daughter and all, but I thought I might be hauled away by the parenthetical police for overuse of punctuation marks!

'Sides, there is always the very very slim chance that you're a sock or just part of the Matrix or Doc Merc's stalker or my grandmother...then again, I could be Weird Al, and you'd never know!


I believe her sister posts here as well-or at least, she used to.
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  #39  
Old 10-13-2006, 11:54 AM
irishgirl irishgirl is offline
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QtM- you're the best. Thank you.

I spend my days doling out morphine, oxynorm, oxycontin, tramadol, co-codamol 30/500 and fentanyl to cardiothoracic patients, who all end up being sent home on just paracetamol (acetominophen). The only people I see complaining of pain are either having a heart attack, have just had their chest opened, or have malignant pain from their oesophageal or lung cancer.

I bow to your expertise in the field of drug-seeking junkie cons with non-malignant chronic pain.
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  #40  
Old 10-13-2006, 03:09 PM
Don't Call Me Shirley Don't Call Me Shirley is offline
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To add a little to the mix, at my county's jail you can bring in your prescriptions and if they are non-narcotic you will get them at appropriate times. If you have narcotics with you or a prescription for them, you will be seeing the doctor to determine if you should be given them while in the jail.

If you are in jail for prescription fraud or something like that, you can pretty much forget about getting any narcotics. You will be prescribed a non-narcotic painkiller. Likewise, people with cocaine charges are unlikely to be continued on any narcotics or Adderal or anything like that.

QtM, can you explain the difference between malignant and non-malignant pain?
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  #41  
Old 10-13-2006, 05:01 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don't Call Me Shirley
QtM, can you explain the difference between malignant and non-malignant pain?
Malignant pain is that pain caused by an active, progressive, destructive process, most commonly due to cancer. It may also be due to infection, or rapid degeneration. It tends to only get worse with time, and death is the usual short to medium-term consequence of the disease process which is also causing the pain.

Non-malignant pain is that pain which persists after some sort of injury or deterioration to tissue, or is just there without evidence of damage to the body. The process which initiated the pain has generally been halted, or the process itself tends to be slow to progress and generally doesn't end in death (think degenerative arthritis). The origin of the pain may be frequently unknown, too. Chronic recurrent headaches, chronic back pain of a musculo-skeletal nature, and fibromyalgia all fall into this category.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishgirl
I bow to your expertise in the field of drug-seeking junkie cons with non-malignant chronic pain.
The expertise is also quite valuable when one practices privately with an affluent clientele. Or anywhere there are office patients. The disease of addiction respects no boundaries. I've met a formerly hopeless junkie who was also a billionaire (money may buy you what you want, but it won't make you get what you need), a now-sober rock star (reality is for people who can't handle drugs), and a recovering addict physician who was the personal doctor to the First Family (no, I won't say which one).
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