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  #1  
Old 11-04-2006, 03:59 PM
Speaker for the Dead Speaker for the Dead is offline
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Could I eat a deer I hit with my car?

Okay, there's a thread in MPSIMS about deer-on-car accidents spiking at this time of year. Let's say I'm a poor college student who happens to smack into some poor doe just outside of town. The car still drives, but I want to make the best of a bad situation and strap Bambi to my roof, so I can make her into steaks.

Can I? If not, is it because of legal or health reasons? Assume I have no conscience.
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  #2  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:02 PM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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In California the state Fish and Game Department takes the deer.
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  #3  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:06 PM
hlanelee hlanelee is offline
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Sure, I've eat deer that have been hit by a car. Many of the good parts are usually undamaged by the trauma. Sometimes it doesn't take much damage to kill a deer and you have to finish it off. If the have broken a hind leg, they are sometimes hard to string up, skin, and gut. You can always make hash out of the parts where the blood hasn't hemorraged into the meat too bad.

I have witnessed several car v. deer incidents and have first hand experience.
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  #4  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:08 PM
hlanelee hlanelee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Simmons
In California the state Fish and Game Department takes the deer.
How do they know when someone runs into a deer?
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  #5  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:19 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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I'm assuming the cops contact them. You're fortunate if you've had a collision with a deer that didn't involve significant damage to your vehicle.
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  #6  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:24 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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I believe in New York it is legal to keep and consume a deer that you hit by a car. But only if the accident occurred during a legal hunting season and only if you had a hunting license. The theory seems to be you already had the legal right to kill a deer and it's your business if you decided to use a car rather than a gun to accomplish this.
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  #7  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:37 PM
Sigene Sigene is offline
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My brother, the state Fish and Game Warden, has fielded several calls like this:

Caller: I, uhh, hit a deer out on highway M.
Him: That's too bad..I hope everyone is ok.....So do you want the deer then?
Caller: Well I hit it with my grain truck.
Him: Oh, I guess we'll have the county vacuum up what's left.


Sometimes, they want to claim the deer, so he fills out the paperwork and they get to eat what's left.
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  #8  
Old 11-04-2006, 04:45 PM
hlanelee hlanelee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferret Herder
I'm assuming the cops contact them. You're fortunate if you've had a collision with a deer that didn't involve significant damage to your vehicle.
Why would someone call the cops? If there's too much damage you call someone to come get you or walk. If the vehicle is still working you drive on home or whereever you are going. I've hit four deer on differnt occasoins and have had varing amounts of damage. Deer are really overpopulated in thsi area.
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  #9  
Old 11-04-2006, 05:04 PM
Scruloose Scruloose is offline
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I'm thinking it's legal to keep the deer in Maine. When we lived there, my wife struck and killed a deer with her car. When the Sheriff's Deputy who responded asked her if she was going to keep it, she declined, so the Deputy took the deer for himself.
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  #10  
Old 11-04-2006, 06:05 PM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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As I understand it, it is legal in PA to do so if you contact the Game Commision.

I hit a dear almost 10 years ago and a cop went looking for it so he could take it home.
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  #11  
Old 11-04-2006, 06:10 PM
River Hippie River Hippie is offline
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I don't know if they still do it but in Indiana you could keep the deer and if you didn't want it there was a place that butchered them and gave the meat to the food bank or some other charity.
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  #12  
Old 11-04-2006, 07:52 PM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hlanelee
How do they know when someone runs into a deer?
You only know if the damage is enough that you can't drive off. I've seen an occasional deer that someone has hit and just left.

Unless you have a big freezer and can butcher the deer yourself, you will have to go to a storage locker and have it butchered and they are going to want to know where you got it. In season you need a deer tag. Out of season you aren't supposed to have one at all.
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Almost anything is easier to get into than out of.
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  #13  
Old 11-04-2006, 08:35 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Moose roadkill up here is given to local Native tribes, if they want to come and pick it up.
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  #14  
Old 11-04-2006, 08:40 PM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is online now
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In Ohio, you can keep any deer you hit. (There's no law that says you can't keep the deer, therefore you can.) But good luck finding a processor. There's a big sign in the processor I go to that says, "Will not accept road kill deer." So in Ohio you'll probably have to process it yourself.
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  #15  
Old 11-04-2006, 08:47 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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In Wisconsin, not only can you take a deer you hit with your car, you can take a deer you hit with your airplane.
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  #16  
Old 11-04-2006, 09:09 PM
brianjedi brianjedi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
In Wisconsin, not only can you take a deer you hit with your car, you can take a deer you hit with your airplane.
How do you hit a deer with an airplane? Get into a game of chicken mid-air with Santa?
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  #17  
Old 11-04-2006, 09:11 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianjedi
How do you hit a deer with an airplane? Get into a game of chicken mid-air with Santa?
On the runway.
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  #18  
Old 11-04-2006, 09:41 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy
Moose roadkill up here is given to local Native tribes, if they want to come and pick it up.
Huh. Down on the Kenai Peninsula, everybody signs up on the roadkill list. You butcher it, half goes to the food bank, and you keep the rest. Anybody is eligible.
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  #19  
Old 11-04-2006, 10:10 PM
Triskadecamus Triskadecamus is offline
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In Virginia, you used to be able to keep it. In fact, since it is illegal to keep deer as pets, or such, it can't be anyone's legal property until it is dead, so you don't have to fill out any forms or anything. You get to have your car fixed by your insurance company, but they never want the deer either. The average rural tow truck driver in VA has a side business in road kill. (By the way, nothing in the world is wrong whith a road killed deer that would not be wrong with a deer with a bullet in him. And, you can get doe meat that way.)

I hit one right in the head, once. He stuck his head out from behind a bush on a tight corner, and whap. The cop called a friend of his who came, and took it away, brought me ten pounds of venison a couple of days later. (All wrapped and ready to freeze.) The real danger in road kill is how long was it dead before someone did the necessary things to keep it from going bad. In this case, it was less than twenty minutes, a lot less time than it takes to hump one out of the forest into a gamecheck stand.

Tris
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  #20  
Old 11-04-2006, 11:59 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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In Minnesota, when you report it to the authorities, you are given the option of taking the deer. (It's hardly sufficient compensation for the damage done to your vehicle, though.)

If you don't want it, they take it. I believe then it is usually donated to a local charity, like a food bank, homeless shelter, etc.
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  #21  
Old 11-05-2006, 07:28 AM
YWalker YWalker is offline
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I would think it's actually a public service if you do take it, so it doesn't present a traffic hazard or something that someone else needs to come clean up. I'm sure game laws vary by state, so to be safe, I would call the cops and ask their permission. If they say no, then you've at least done your duty and pointed out where they need to come clean up the corpse.

But we need a hunter in here. Don't you need to dress the deer right away, so that the meat doesn't taste horrible? I'm not a hunter, but members of my family are. I was under the impression that you needed to make some kind of cuts and bleed them out or else the meat would taste pretty lousy.
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  #22  
Old 11-05-2006, 07:35 AM
terrierterrific terrierterrific is offline
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Road Kill

Yes you can if you live in Tennessee. There is a state law saying you can gather roadkill.
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  #23  
Old 11-05-2006, 09:06 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hlanelee
Why would someone call the cops? If there's too much damage you call someone to come get you or walk. If the vehicle is still working you drive on home or whereever you are going. I've hit four deer on differnt occasoins and have had varing amounts of damage. Deer are really overpopulated in thsi area.
Maybe they have insurance and need an accident report? Just a guess.

Where I work there is a simple form that needs to be filled out and then you can take the deer. If not animal control comes out and takes it. It is not used or donated, it's just dumped.

Where I live the deer stay where they land until they rot away. I had to call the health department a couple of times because of the buzzards feeding on a deer right next to my daughters bus stop. I hear ther is one guy who picks up for the whole county.
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  #24  
Old 11-05-2006, 12:20 PM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hlanelee
Why would someone call the cops?

In some locations in order to keep the deer you still have to get a tag, either from a State Trooper, or a DNR warden.
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  #25  
Old 11-05-2006, 12:45 PM
StuffLikeThatThere StuffLikeThatThere is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YWalker
But we need a hunter in here. Don't you need to dress the deer right away, so that the meat doesn't taste horrible? I'm not a hunter, but members of my family are. I was under the impression that you needed to make some kind of cuts and bleed them out or else the meat would taste pretty lousy.
I'm not a hunter, but Mr. Stuff used to be quite a hunter. He will not, as a rule, eat venison that has not been dressed by himself or someone he knows, because he doesn't like the taste of venison that hasn't been properly and immediately "dressed." If he knows who shot the deer, he can determine whether the meat was taken care of right.

If a deer is shot, typically much of the blood has been pumped out through the wound. In the case of a deer hit on the road, the blood has not been removed, and the intestines have not been removed (unless of course you pull over, whip out your hunting knife, and get to work). The intestines deteriorate very rapidly and cause an unpleasant flavor in the meat.

So, yeah, you can eat it and there is no health hazard, but it's not going to taste as good as a hunted deer that was properly dressed.

All information above is solely the opinion of Mr. Stuff and is not endorsed by the NRA, Venison Eaters of America, or the State Highway Patrol. As always, YMMV.
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  #26  
Old 11-05-2006, 01:42 PM
Loach Loach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites
In some locations in order to keep the deer you still have to get a tag, either from a State Trooper, or a DNR warden.
The deer has to have a Do Not Resuscitate order?
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  #27  
Old 11-05-2006, 01:59 PM
mks57 mks57 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loach
The deer has to have a Do Not Resuscitate order?
Department of Natural Resources. Also known as the game warden.
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  #28  
Old 11-06-2006, 04:23 AM
intention intention is offline
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When I was a kid (very rural Northern California) roadkill was a significant part of the menu. I remember once we were following a car with some City Folks in it. They hit a deer, broke its leg. The following conversation went like this:

CF: Oh my God, oh my God, is it ok?

Us: Umm, no, you broke its leg.

CF: Oh my God, what should we do, should we take it to a vet? We don't know anyone around here.

Us: No worries, we'll take care of it.

CF: Oh, thank you so much. Will it be OK?

Us: I'm sure it will be OK.

Well, I'm here to tell you that it was not only OK ... it was delicious.

w.
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  #29  
Old 11-06-2006, 06:31 AM
Shirley Ujest Shirley Ujest is offline
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This is not gold, but here in Michigan, you call the cops to advise them and they usually give the ok for you to take it.

If you don't they call someone to do the clean up and that someone is a former co-worker of my husband who salveges the meat. (I just called Mr. Ujest to get the Michigan Scoop on this.)
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  #30  
Old 11-06-2006, 08:24 AM
zuma zuma is offline
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I'd think that if you had a car, and could afford to drive it, you could better survive off the 1 dollar double cheeseburgers at mcdonalts. If you want to mess with roadkill, go for it. And if you really want to live off dead dear, you could probably get more than your fill with a baseball bat, assuming deer were plentiful enough.
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  #31  
Old 11-06-2006, 09:17 AM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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In MA (at least the town in which my father is a police dispatcher), they maintain a list. If your name is at the top, you get a call to go get it... if you can't, they go to the next name on the list. When you go get one, you move back to the bottom of the list. [if the deer is down, but not dead, they bring out "the item," a .22 rifle kept at the station for the purpose, to dispatch the deer... it saves the paperwork required if the officers were to use their service weapon to finish the deed... the sight of the .22 makes the liberals who hit the poor deer sad. It makes someone else VERY happy! ]

In NH, you'll often have multiple folks pull up and say, "Are you keeping the deer? No? Can I take it? " Most PDs have a "list"

As I DO carry a hunting knife in my car, I'd be all set to gut out a deer in the event that I hit one with my car... I'm not sure I'd stop to try to take someone else's though... but it's crossed my mind when I've seen a nice fresh one downed.
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  #32  
Old 11-06-2006, 09:20 AM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zuma
And if you really want to live off dead dear, you could probably get more than your fill with a baseball bat, assuming deer were plentiful enough.
I have a hard enough time finding one with bow & arrow or firearm... Unless you're a Ninja, I'm not sure how you'd sneak up on one with a baseball bat.
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  #33  
Old 11-06-2006, 10:01 AM
Godfrey Daniels Godfrey Daniels is offline
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In Oregon, deer hit people!

deer attack
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  #34  
Old 11-06-2006, 12:24 PM
psychonaut psychonaut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy
Moose roadkill up here is given to local Native tribes, if they want to come and pick it up.
I thought cannibalism was illegal in Alaska. Or is it really possible to hit and kill a moose without destroying the car and its occupants?
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  #35  
Old 11-06-2006, 06:21 PM
Roboto Roboto is offline
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My sister's boyfriend in upstate New York tells a funny story about his neighbor who hit a deer with her car. He's a hunter didn't see the point of the deer going to waste, so he strung up the deer on a branch of the tree in the front yard and began "dressing" it. Aside from being a hunter, he is also a teacher at the local school, and described witnessing the school bus passing by with several mortified students staring at their teacher whose forearms were covered up to the elbows in blood.
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  #36  
Old 11-06-2006, 06:34 PM
Speaker for the Dead Speaker for the Dead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by intention
Well, I'm here to tell you that it was not only OK ... it was delicious.

w.
Just out of curiousity, what should I do if I don't kill the deer I hit? I don't normally carry knives or firearms in my vehicle, so what could I do to put it out of its misery?
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  #37  
Old 11-07-2006, 08:17 AM
slaphead slaphead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speaker for the Dead
Just out of curiousity, what should I do if I don't kill the deer I hit? I don't normally carry knives or firearms in my vehicle, so what could I do to put it out of its misery?
Hit it with the car again? Batter it with a tire iron?

My father once hit a large antelope on a rural road in Uganda, at night. His car was totalled, and the deer had a broken back and was screaming in agony. He had to beat its skull in with a hammer.
After that, he always kept a machete in the car.
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  #38  
Old 11-07-2006, 09:25 AM
homeskillet homeskillet is offline
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When I was in grade school we hit a deer while traveling along the interstate. The deer was still in relatively good shape, well apart from the being killed part. At one point the highway patrolman asked my parents if they wanted to keep the deer. My parents just looked at each other in bewilderment. Finally my mother says, "What on Earth for?"
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  #39  
Old 11-07-2006, 09:50 AM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speaker for the Dead
Just out of curiousity, what should I do if I don't kill the deer I hit? I don't normally carry knives or firearms in my vehicle, so what could I do to put it out of its misery?
Call the police and let them take care of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slaphead
My father once hit a large antelope on a rural road in Uganda
Was Idi Amin allowed to eat any people he hit with his car?





















Back to work, P.K..
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  #40  
Old 11-07-2006, 09:56 AM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speaker for the Dead
Just out of curiousity, what should I do if I don't kill the deer I hit? I don't normally carry knives or firearms in my vehicle, so what could I do to put it out of its misery?

See post 31. The local PD likely has "an item."
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  #41  
Old 11-07-2006, 10:14 AM
Missy2U Missy2U is offline
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Here are the deer vs. vehicle instructions for Illinois.

"The driver involved in an accident involving a deer may take possession of the animal. If the driver does not want it, any Illinois resident may claim the deer. Anyone possessing the deer must keep a personal record of the date the deer was claimed, the sex of the animal, the location of the accident, and the place where the deer or deer parts are stored. This information must be kept until the deer is consumed or no longer in the possession of any person. This information must be provided to any law enforcement officer investigating the death and possession of the deer."

They only make you get a tag if you take the deer to a taxidermist or tannery.

I also did not know that 11 people were killed last year in deer vs. vehicle accidents. 8 of them were motorcycle drivers or passengers.
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  #42  
Old 11-07-2006, 10:34 AM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuffLikeThatThere
So, yeah, you can eat it and there is no health hazard, but it's not going to taste as good as a hunted deer that was properly dressed.
Another non-hunter chiming in. I've known hunters who were quite vocal about the need to "dress" deer (or any game) immediately. Since they also liked to cook, I'd have to say they knew what they were talking about. Delicious!
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  #43  
Old 11-07-2006, 10:50 AM
Cowgirl Jules Cowgirl Jules is offline
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As a hunter (but I don't think we can keep roadkill in California) I have to back this up. The first thing we do is field dress the deer, which mostly entails getting the guts out. Doing this drains most of the blood too and cools the meat. If you hit a deer that you wanted to keep, you'd best carry a knife in your vehicle.

As far as eating a roadkill, I would look at the meat. You're going to see significant bruising where the deer was actually hit, and you don't want to eat that. But if it was smacked in the head or the front quarters, the back quarters (which are better anyway) are still going to be OK. Even though we're not supposed to in this state, I've driven by roadkill and noticed that someone has sliced out the backstraps, leaving the rest of the meat on the road. That's the best part!
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  #44  
Old 11-07-2006, 02:40 PM
Ichbin Dubist Ichbin Dubist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo
I believe in New York it is legal to keep and consume a deer that you hit by a car. But only if the accident occurred during a legal hunting season and only if you had a hunting license.
During the time that I lived on a farm in upstate New York about 10 years ago, I saw a large doe get struck in the head by a car right in front of the house -- it staggered onto the driveway and dropped dead, and the car kept going. I'm not a hunter, but a friend from Texas who had hunted all his life was staying with me at the time. He saw that it was only injured in the head, and he wanted to dress the deer in the yard. This was several weeks before the start of hunting season, I believe. We called the local police about it, and because we lived on a farm and farmers can apparently shoot deer out of season, he came by with a form for me to fill out and tagged the deer in my name, although I had no license and was not running a working farm.

The venison was tasty, and we kept making jokes about eating roadkill throughout the meal.

As an aside, 10 years ago at least New York had a six-month-long squirrel season. I though about getting a squirrel-hunting license just for the novelty of it. I would imagine that most people who eat squirrel wouldn't bother with worrying about the license or the whether it's in season or not. Just don't tie the thing to the front of your car.
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  #45  
Old 11-07-2006, 02:54 PM
StuffLikeThatThere StuffLikeThatThere is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ichbin Dubist
We called the local police about it, and because we lived on a farm and farmers can apparently shoot deer out of season ...
At least our jurisdiction, farmers can, but must have a permit. If, for instance, the deer population is wreaking havoc on your corn crop, you can get a permit good for seven deer. When you've killed seven, if you're still having a problem, you get another permit.

However, in the case you mentioned, I can't see anyone's panties getting in a bunch about it. Besides, in our jurisdiction, roadkill is fair game. So to speak.
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  #46  
Old 11-07-2006, 04:52 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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[QUOTE=Illionois] This information must be kept until the deer is consumed or no longer in the possession of any person...[QUOTE]
So eat quick!

I'm surprised nobody else has mentioned this, but trying to eat a deer with a car is awkward, regardless of who hit it or with what. Most people use a fork.
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  #47  
Old 11-07-2006, 05:00 PM
BobLibDem BobLibDem is offline
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In Michigan you may keep any deer you hit and kill. You need to get a police report for your insurance and they will give you a tag to put on the carcass so you may transport it to your butcher or whatever. Otherwise you might get stopped on the highway for having game out of season or without a license.
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  #48  
Old 11-07-2006, 07:46 PM
Translucent Daydream Translucent Daydream is offline
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This thread was really informative to me. I was always told that if you hit something with a car and kill it, usually the intestines of the animal rupture and the edible, yummy parts are sort of tainted...

But then again we don't have many deer here, we have wild pigs. One of those totalled my beloved Geo Metro and when the sheriff came out he told me not to take it with me because it would make me sick if I ate it (rupturing innards...)

Hmm... Probably different for a deer perhaps?
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  #49  
Old 11-07-2006, 08:22 PM
Cowgirl Jules Cowgirl Jules is offline
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I don't really see why it would be different for a pig vs. a deer, except that a pig is slung closer to the ground and therefore a body shot from a vehicle might be more likely. If you could obviously see where the animal was hit and it wasn't in the midsection, you'd probably be home free. If you couldn't tell, gutting the animal would certainly show you.

But why on earth couldn't you just rinse the meat out, if you dressed it quickly enough? We don't pass on hunted animals that have been gut-shot; we just clean the meat really well. Besides, most of the yummy parts aren't hanging around the intestines.
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  #50  
Old 11-07-2006, 08:38 PM
Raguleader Raguleader is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
On the runway.
I've heard a story (sorry no cite) that there is (or was) an Air Force pilot who rightfully earned the callsign "Bambi" because of an incident involving a T-38 and a deer.
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