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  #1  
Old 11-21-2006, 08:47 PM
alice_in_wonderland alice_in_wonderland is offline
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What is Tom Sawyer by Rush about?

This is probably an exceptionally stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.

Rush aren't exactly known as lyrical masters, and Getty Lee really can't sing, and I know that they're more of a guitar based band, but...

What on earth is Tom Sawyer about? Can it really be as nonsensical as it seems?

A friend suggested that it was the product of a drug induced haze, but I countered that pretty much every song by Pink Floyd is the product of a drug induced haze and they don't have the same problem.

As to if Tom Sawyer seems less absurd while IN a drug induced haze...uh, no it doesn't. Don't ask me how I know that.
  #2  
Old 11-21-2006, 09:27 PM
minlokwat minlokwat is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland

Rush aren't exactly known as lyrical masters, and Getty Lee really can't sing, and I know that they're more of a guitar based band, but...
Wow, I couldn't disagree more. But here is what I was able to dig up:

" 'Tom Sawyer' was a collaboration between myself and Pye Dubois, an excellent lyricist who wrote the lyrics for Max Webster. His original lyrics were kind of a portrait of a modern day rebel, a free-spirited individualist striding through the world wide-eyed and purposeful. I added the themes of reconciling the boy and man in myself, and the difference between what people are and what others perceive them to be - namely me I guess." - Neil Peart, in the December 1985 Backstage Club newsletter
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Old 11-21-2006, 09:31 PM
alice_in_wonderland alice_in_wonderland is offline
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No, see - I get what they say that it's about - it's just both the lyrics and the explanation of the lyrics seem really...weak.
  #4  
Old 11-21-2006, 09:39 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is online now
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It always seems to me to be more about agents provocateurs, or real-life trolls. Those that make others take dangerous chances or incite them to violent actions and sit back and laugh at the results. Then when everyone has been duly riled or following some fashion he'll change everything again.

Next time I listen to it I'll try the suggestions listed above and see if I come to any deeper conclusion, k?
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Old 11-21-2006, 09:56 PM
Hentor the Barbarian Hentor the Barbarian is offline
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Wow, of all the criticisms of Rush (and one can't swing a dead cat without hitting a criticism of Rush), I don't think I've ever heard anyone criticize Neil Peart's lyrical abilities.

I think the most accurate criticism of the lyrics to Tom Sawyer is that they are very much unlike the Mark Twain character Tom Sawyer, who is generally slavishly attendant to conventions, in contrast, for example, to Huck Finn.

But as to the meaning of the lyrics of the song, I don't see any reason to disbelieve their explanation - the lyrics seem to be a pretty straightforward description of an unconventional, independent free-thinker in a wide open expansive world.
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Old 11-21-2006, 10:05 PM
Oakminster Oakminster is offline
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Tom Sawyer meant that Kerry Von Erich was on his way to the ring....
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Old 11-21-2006, 10:43 PM
alice_in_wonderland alice_in_wonderland is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hentor the Barbarian
But as to the meaning of the lyrics of the song, I don't see any reason to disbelieve their explanation - the lyrics seem to be a pretty straightforward description of an unconventional, independent free-thinker in a wide open expansive world.
Ok - I don't think I'm expressing myself very well. I guess my major objection (if you can call it that) is that the lyrics are so..hokey. I assumed that I was missing some deep thought or something, but apparently I'm not.

Perhaps I just prefer lyrics that are less obvious. (That sounds obnoxious, but I don't mean it that way.)
  #8  
Old 11-21-2006, 11:06 PM
Hentor the Barbarian Hentor the Barbarian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland
Ok - I don't think I'm expressing myself very well. I guess my major objection (if you can call it that) is that the lyrics are so..hokey. I assumed that I was missing some deep thought or something, but apparently I'm not.

Perhaps I just prefer lyrics that are less obvious. (That sounds obnoxious, but I don't mean it that way.)
I thought your concern was that they were "nonsensical", as if they were the product of a drug induced haze. Now your concern is that they are too obvious?

Hey, you don't like the lyrics? No skin off my nose. They aren't my favorite lyrics, nor are they much representative of most Rush lyrics.

But you could at least try to nail down what it is you don't like about them.
  #9  
Old 11-21-2006, 11:19 PM
alice_in_wonderland alice_in_wonderland is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hentor the Barbarian
But you could at least try to nail down what it is you don't like about them.
Whoa there big fella! No need to get het up.

I guess they're just SOOO simple I assumed there had to be some deeper meaning that I was missing.

Apparently I was wrong.

FWIW, I actually sort of like the song.
  #10  
Old 11-21-2006, 11:22 PM
Frank Frank is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hentor the Barbarian
I think the most accurate criticism of the lyrics to Tom Sawyer is that they are very much unlike the Mark Twain character Tom Sawyer, who is generally slavishly attendant to conventions, in contrast, for example, to Huck Finn.
Yeah, but "today's Huck Finn" doesn't scan.
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Old 11-21-2006, 11:31 PM
GingerOfTheNorth GingerOfTheNorth is offline
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I am making note here of my affection for both Rush and Geddy Lee's voice.
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Old 11-21-2006, 11:34 PM
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I just looked the lyrics up and was surprised to see that the line that I thought was "No worries, no worries" is actually "The world is, the world is."
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Old 11-21-2006, 11:44 PM
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The songTom Sawyer reminds me of a friend from college whose personality was pretty much summed up by the lyrics. It was no coincidence that this was one of his favorite songs. Here's to you, J-P, wherever you are.

I agree with whoever said the Tom Sawyer in the song more closely resembles Huck Finn. The book's Tom Sawyer was more caught up in fantasies of being a pirate or an adventurer of some sort, as in the later chapters of Huckleberry Finn where Tom hatches a Count of Monte Cristo-like scheme to free Jim from Aunt Sally's house.
  #14  
Old 11-22-2006, 01:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minlokwat
Pye Dubois, an excellent lyricist who wrote the lyrics for Max Webster.Neil Peart, in the December 1985 Backstage Club newsletter

Boy, Max Webster is a band I haven't thought of for a long time, back to my high school daze:

This parties higher than the Eifel tower


yogurt blood lunacy shoes, cocaine colored computer cards


where did I park my wheels


now those were lyrics
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  #15  
Old 11-22-2006, 01:43 AM
Albert Rose Albert Rose is offline
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I just looked the lyrics up here. I can't say I'm getting much out of the song. Okay, he's a tough guy with mean mean pride, and he thinks for himself rather than being a sellout.

What you say about his company is what you say about society...? So he represents society by thinking for himself? Riiiight.

He gets high on you and the energy you trade... Me, I'm just lost.

I like the song, though.
  #16  
Old 11-22-2006, 01:47 AM
bdgr bdgr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland
This is probably an exceptionally stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.

Rush aren't exactly known as lyrical masters, and Getty Lee really can't sing, and I know that they're more of a guitar based band, but...
.
gotta say...I was a little bewildered by this

Rush absolutely are known as lyrical masters....Neil Peart is an incredible lyricist.

Geddys vocals are a bit of an aquired taste for sure, but I personally love the way he sings.

and Tom Sawyer is pretty much just about what they describe. It's not one of their more inolved songs lyrically.
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Old 11-22-2006, 02:04 AM
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I, too, am suprised about Rush not being known as lyrical masters. Rush has, for the most part, always had great lyrics that went deeper than a lot of other bands. My personal favorite is Losing It, from Signals.

Slee
  #18  
Old 11-22-2006, 02:55 AM
Sam Stone Sam Stone is offline
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That's one of my favorites, too.

alice in wonderland, have a read through some of these lyrics:

Subdivisions

The Camera Eye

Witch Hunt

I expecially love the line, "Ignorance, and prejudice, and fear walk hand in hand."
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Old 11-22-2006, 02:55 AM
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It says on Wikipedia that "Tom Sawyer" was used as the theme music for MacGyver in Brazil.

Not a bad choice.
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Old 11-22-2006, 03:16 AM
Infovore Infovore is offline
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"Tom Sawyer" is not a good representative sample of Rush lyrics to rag on--Pye Dubois was never known (at least in his collaborations with Peart) to be a lyrical genius. He also co-wrote "Between Sun and Moon" from "Counterparts," which contains the deathless chorus:

"Oh--oh, yes to yes, to oh, to yes--
Why the sun? Why the sun?"

But when you look at some of the songs folks already mentioned above ("Subdivisions," "Losing It," plus things like "Natural Science" and the whole "2112" suite) I think Neil Peart's lyrical efforts hold up fairly well to most other bands of the era.
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Old 11-22-2006, 08:50 AM
RTA RTA is offline
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It's appropriate to state here that Neil Peart is one of the biggest Ayn Rand nerds that ever walked, and that many Rush lyrics are thinly camouflaged devotionals to Objectivism. Not all, but many.

You all may ponder the lyrics further; I will continue to rock out to Lifeson's guitar virtuosity, and not pay as much attention to what the bass player is saying.
  #22  
Old 11-22-2006, 09:12 AM
AndyPolley AndyPolley is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTA
You all may ponder the lyrics further; I will continue to rock out to Lifeson's guitar virtuosity, and not pay as much attention to what the bass player is saying.
But do pay attention to what the bass player is playing, as Geddy's bass playing is top notch.

I'll also add to the "Wha..?" regarding Rush not being lyrical masters. I don't know Alice's tastes, but I've always felt Rush was pretty good at delivering above average lyrics throughout their history. Compared to other big rock bands like Zep and the Stones. Give me Tom Sawyer and his mind not being for rent anyday over "I'm so hot for her, I'm so hot for her, I'm so hot for her...she's so cold! So cold socold so cooooold! She's so cold she's like an ice cream cone."

"He knows changes aren't permanent...but change is." That's good stuff.
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Old 11-22-2006, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Oakminster
Tom Sawyer meant that Kerry Von Erich was on his way to the ring....
...or Billy Mueller was up at bat.
  #24  
Old 11-22-2006, 09:41 AM
Nothing Special Nothing Special is offline
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Okay, itís about a young adult of the day (in this case the early 1980ís), who is more sophisticated, perceptive, prideful, and determined than his predecessors. If you donít like him, itís a comment on the society he grew up and exists in, and not completely his fault.

Too late to be a hippie, too early to be slacker, whatís a kid to do but cast a cold eye on all of it? Watch out for him! Such are many of our current productive citizens.

Peart could punch out some great lyrics from time to time, unusual for a drummer. This song is among them. Many other times he is just didactic and obvious, and his drumming just plods along. You just know he isnít trying that hard. Geddy Lee with his whining, strident vocalizations occasionally hit it just right, and this is one such instance.

There.
  #25  
Old 11-22-2006, 10:02 AM
Hentor the Barbarian Hentor the Barbarian is offline
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Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland
Whoa there big fella! No need to get het up.

I guess they're just SOOO simple I assumed there had to be some deeper meaning that I was missing.

Apparently I was wrong.

FWIW, I actually sort of like the song.
I'm actually not het up at all. I'm just pointing out that your first complaint was that the lyrics were nonsensical, and now your complaint is that they are... overly sensical. It really matters zip to me if you like or dislike the song.

I like the song (it was the first Rush song I learned to play on the drums), but it bothers me that it is so overplayed and that it has become the song the band is best known for. Witch Hunt and The Camera Eye, as Sam Stone noted, are much better songs musically and lyrically from the same album, but you'll probably never hear them on the radio. Likewise, you may occasionally hear Limelight as well, but they won't use that one in car commercials either.

Sam, how about "Grim faced and forbidding, their faces closed tight. An angular mass of New Yorkers." Whenever I'm in a crowd on a large city street (okay, except for Toronto) that song comes back to me. "My feet catch the pulse and the purposeful stride."
  #26  
Old 11-22-2006, 10:18 AM
alice_in_wonderland alice_in_wonderland is offline
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"Nonsensical" was not the right word. I think "nonsense" is maybe more what I was thinking of.

It's like the lyrics are trying WAAAAAY too hard to say something without actually saying something. However, I suppose, were I a young rebelious fella perhaps I would identify with them more.

That being said, I'm surprised more people aren't giving props to Rush's instrumentation - IMHO that's where they're great. Of course, I'm not exactly an expert on these things.
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Old 11-22-2006, 10:22 AM
FriarTed FriarTed is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTA
It's appropriate to state here that Neil Peart is one of the biggest Ayn Rand nerds that ever walked, and that many Rush lyrics are thinly camouflaged devotionals to Objectivism. Not all, but many.

You all may ponder the lyrics further; I will continue to rock out to Lifeson's guitar virtuosity, and not pay as much attention to what the bass player is saying.
the lyric
"...his mind is not for rent
to any god or government..."
is definitely a reference to John Galt of ATLAS SHRUGGED.
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Old 11-22-2006, 10:28 AM
Auntbeast Auntbeast is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTA
It's appropriate to state here that Neil Peart is one of the biggest Ayn Rand nerds that ever walked, and that many Rush lyrics are thinly camouflaged devotionals to Objectivism. Not all, but many.

You all may ponder the lyrics further; I will continue to rock out to Lifeson's guitar virtuosity, and not pay as much attention to what the bass player is saying.
I recall really liking the song years ago. I clicked over to read the actual lyrics. I am currently rereading Atlas Shrugged. My response to the lyrics was "wow, read Ayn Rand much?" BEFORE I read your post.

I'm pretty gobsmacked that anyone would think that Rush isn't far above the crowd lyrically. The fact their songs have actual words should count for a bunch.

Then again, I had occasion lately to reread some Boston lyrics. I didn't have a clue that someone was a fan of AA, being clean and sober, etc.
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Old 11-22-2006, 10:48 AM
KidCharlemagne KidCharlemagne is offline
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I like Rush's mid-career lyrics. The early stuff, like the stuff on 2112 sounds like someones reading a Dungeons and Dragons Module.
  #30  
Old 11-22-2006, 11:01 AM
Ximenean Ximenean is offline
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Originally Posted by Auntbeast
I'm pretty gobsmacked that anyone would think that Rush isn't far above the crowd lyrically. The fact their songs have actual words should count for a bunch.
I don't even think Neil Peart thinks he's a particularly talented lyricist. I've heard him dismiss his lyrics as a very small part of what he does, something he spends a couple of weeks on every few years, and only then because the other two have even less inspiration. It seems to me that he has about three or four not particularly interesting ideas which he recycles endlessly. His lyrics are just so cold and joyless. Good songs should have some emotion behind them.

And so what that they have "actual words"? "Womp-bomp-a-loom-op-a-womp-bam-boom" is a far better line than anything Peart ever wrote.
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Old 11-22-2006, 11:06 AM
Infovore Infovore is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTA
It's appropriate to state here that Neil Peart is one of the biggest Ayn Rand nerds that ever walked, and that many Rush lyrics are thinly camouflaged devotionals to Objectivism. Not all, but many.
This used to be true, but it hasn't been for many years. Studying Rush lyrics from their earlier era (2112, "The Trees," "Red Barchetta," etc.) you can see a clear Objectivist slant to many of them, but as he got older he moved further away from the viewpoint and hasn't claimed Objectivist beliefs for more than 15 years.
  #32  
Old 11-22-2006, 11:14 AM
Hentor the Barbarian Hentor the Barbarian is offline
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Originally Posted by KidCharlemagne
I like Rush's mid-career lyrics. The early stuff, like the stuff on 2112 sounds like someones reading a Dungeons and Dragons Module.


There is a good bit of that, but I'll forgive them because By-Tor and the Snowdog rocks hard, as does 2112. 2112 is in fact most clearly linked to Ayn Rand, rather than to the D&D type stuff, as is Anthem, from Fly by Night. I hate Ayn Rand.

Peart seemed to grow out of this Randian individualism by the time he was writing things like "In different circles we keep holding our ground. Indifferent circles, we keep spinning round and round and round," and "Hand over fist, paper around the stone, scissors cut the paper and the rock must stand alone."

Speaking of By-Tor and the Snowdog, I wanted to be either By-Tor or the Snowdog when I signed up for the board, but the names were already taken. Yet, in my time here, I don't think I've ever seen either one of those folks. S'okay, though, I think I've come to like Hentor the Barbarian pretty well, although I don't really every go snowshoe-ing.
  #33  
Old 11-22-2006, 11:27 AM
Hentor the Barbarian Hentor the Barbarian is offline
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Originally Posted by Usram
It seems to me that he has about three or four not particularly interesting ideas which he recycles endlessly.
There's possibly an argument to be made for this, although I'd need to see it to be convinced. It seems to me that he finds novel ideas to explore.
Quote:
His lyrics are just so cold and joyless. Good songs should have some emotion behind them.
They might be lacking in joy, but joy is not the only emotion. I think that the lyrics to Witch Hunt evoke very well the mood of the song. Like I said before, The Camera Eye captures the feelings of being an individual and encountering modern society very well. And Analog Kid is a very joyful song, in my opinion.

But yes, I agree that if you are looking for a light and airy kind of joy as a matter of course, you'll not find it in Rush lyrics. Probably it is better that you stick with "Womp-bomp-a-loom-op-a-womp-bam-boom" or even "mmmm-bop, bop, doo-bop..." or "blue dabba dee dabba di".
  #34  
Old 11-22-2006, 11:59 AM
Jayrot Jayrot is offline
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Catch the witness, catch the wit,
Catch the spirit, catch the spit.
So what does this mean?
  #35  
Old 11-22-2006, 12:04 PM
Red Barchetta Red Barchetta is offline
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Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland
That being said, I'm surprised more people aren't giving props to Rush's instrumentation - IMHO that's where they're great.
Because it's a given. All three of Rush's members are widely considered to be among the best players of their respective instruments.
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Old 11-22-2006, 12:15 PM
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I was thinking more of Lenny Kravitz (who, IMHO, can write a chorus but his songs are disgustingly repetitive) when I was mentally thinking about the lyrics of Rush vs. other fodder.

It has always seemed to me that Rush makes the music Rush wants to make. They aren't artfully packaged in a predetermined cubby and thrust down our throats via Clear Channel. When I was but a wee lass, very rarely were bands such as Rush or Ozzy Osbourne played on the Radio. It weirds me out that now Ozzy's songs can be used to pimp Cadillacs. I've always liked the individuality of Rush. In a childhood room filled with posters, the main poster I had was of Neil Peart in his drum kit. No, I don't play drums, no he wasn't there for his looks, no I didn't have a crush on him, but the boy could play a mean drum.

Boston and Rush are two bands I would love to see in an open air arena. When I hear their music it seems to extend beyond the bounds of construction. The idea of their music being played out to the universe always appealed to me. My small contribution was sitting on a Smoky Mountain overlook, perched on the top of the truck, blasting out their music to the tune of my teen angst.
  #37  
Old 11-22-2006, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland
...but I countered that pretty much every song by Pink Floyd is the product of a drug induced haze
Believe it or not, Roger Waters (who wrote most of Pink Floyd's post-Barrett material) wasn't much of a drug user. As I recall, he said he'd taken LSD only once; my extremely cursory reseach doesn't turn up a cite on that, but I did find this interview with Richard Wright, Pink Floyd's keyboardist, who says:
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It's a mistake thinking that drugs supplied Pink Floyd with the inspiration. The ones who took drugs were the ones who came to see the shows.
Granted, he's got an interest in downplaying the extent of his own drug use, but he seems pretty up-front about things in that interview.
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Old 11-22-2006, 12:46 PM
Least Original User Name Ever Least Original User Name Ever is offline
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Originally Posted by Lucky 13
The songTom Sawyer reminds me of a friend from college whose personality was pretty much summed up by the lyrics. It was no coincidence that this was one of his favorite songs. Here's to you, J-P, wherever you are.

I agree with whoever said the Tom Sawyer in the song more closely resembles Huck Finn. The book's Tom Sawyer was more caught up in fantasies of being a pirate or an adventurer of some sort, as in the later chapters of Huckleberry Finn where Tom hatches a Count of Monte Cristo-like scheme to free Jim from Aunt Sally's house.

Ah, but in the book, we're supposed to be DISGUSTED by Tom's antics. Huck wants to go up and unlock Jim's door, Tom wants to make it into an adventure, as he is wont to do. How deep do you want to go with this one? Is it the Old World (Tom) versus the New World (Huck)? Huck is a pragmatist. If there's one philosophy that the United States embraced, it was pragmatism.
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Old 11-22-2006, 12:48 PM
Hal Briston Hal Briston is offline
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Originally Posted by Oakminster
Tom Sawyer meant that Kerry Von Erich was on his way to the ring....
Heh...that was my first thought as well.
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Old 11-22-2006, 12:55 PM
GingerOfTheNorth GingerOfTheNorth is offline
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Originally Posted by Red Barchetta
Because it's a given. All three of Rush's members are widely considered to be among the best players of their respective instruments.
Ditto. Neal Peart (circa A Show Of Hands) was the best drummer in rock. I haven't paid much attention since the early 90s, so I haven't got anything for comparison now and he may still be the best.
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Old 11-22-2006, 01:25 PM
Weirddave Weirddave is offline
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Originally Posted by GingerOfTheNorth
I am making note here of my affection for both Rush and Geddy Lee's voice.
Got $10? Maybe you can hire him.
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Old 11-22-2006, 01:47 PM
GingerOfTheNorth GingerOfTheNorth is offline
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Got $10? Maybe you can hire him.
Ten bucks is ten bucks, eh?
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Old 11-22-2006, 04:42 PM
Madd Maxx Madd Maxx is offline
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Originally Posted by GingerOfTheNorth
I am making note here of my affection for both Rush and Geddy Lee's voice.
You are from Canada. you have to like Rush. It think its even a law or something.
  #44  
Old 11-22-2006, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Jayrot
So what does this mean?
Catch the witness, catch the wit.
Catch the spirit, catch the spit.


It is a challenge to the existing orthodoxy to deal with this brash type of young man. He is seeing it all, he has some sense of humor about it, he is inspired, and he is frothing at the mouth in his effort to tell people what he is seeing.

Thatís what it means.
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Old 11-22-2006, 05:20 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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Originally Posted by GingerOfTheNorth
Ditto. Neal Peart (circa A Show Of Hands) was the best drummer in rock. I haven't paid much attention since the early 90s, so I haven't got anything for comparison now and he may still be the best.

Well, despite personal tragedy that he struggled to overcome, he has only gotten better. You can guess where that leaves him ranked.
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Old 11-22-2006, 06:17 PM
Nothing Special Nothing Special is offline
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Originally Posted by Gatopescado
Well, despite personal tragedy that he struggled to overcome, he has only gotten better. You can guess where that leaves him ranked.
No matter what Peart has done or will do, there is Keith Moon and then all the rest, buried deeply below. And thatís with Moon being dead for the last 38 years.

Peart could almost exceed Moon on occasion (Spirit of Radio, Tom Sawyer), but he took too much time off on his lesser numbers. What was up with that trendy little pony tail in the 1980ís? Moon very rarely held off at all, and even in those cases (Relay, Join Together) when seen live, heís thrashing away wildly, just as always.

Moon never really let up until he croaked. Peart was a little too effete and self-preservatory. Also, Moonís wife and daughter managed to survive him, at least until recently. Thatís one hell of a feat.
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Old 11-22-2006, 06:48 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Nothing Special
No matter what Peart has done or will do, there is Keith Moon and then all the rest, buried deeply below. And thatís with Moon being dead for the last 38 years.

Peart could almost exceed Moon on occasion (Spirit of Radio, Tom Sawyer), but he took too much time off on his lesser numbers. What was up with that trendy little pony tail in the 1980ís? Moon very rarely held off at all, and even in those cases (Relay, Join Together) when seen live, heís thrashing away wildly, just as always.

Moon never really let up until he croaked. Peart was a little too effete and self-preservatory. Also, Moonís wife and daughter managed to survive him, at least until recently. Thatís one hell of a feat.
Nah, Bonham's the man. Few rock drummers can groove like Bonham.
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Old 11-22-2006, 07:23 PM
Hentor the Barbarian Hentor the Barbarian is offline
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Bonham could groove, and Moon could burn with intensity, but on any given song, they weren't doing much that was particularly interesting. Apart from keeping time, they only distinguished themselves occasionally. Peart brings the drums up to an integral level of the song for pretty much every song. Nah, Peart takes those comparisons, hands down.
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Old 11-22-2006, 07:37 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Hentor the Barbarian
Bonham could groove, and Moon could burn with intensity, but on any given song, they weren't doing much that was particularly interesting. Apart from keeping time, they only distinguished themselves occasionally. Peart brings the drums up to an integral level of the song for pretty much every song. Nah, Peart takes those comparisons, hands down.


Bonham didn't do anything interesting? Are you joking? I'm not even talking about drum solos (booooooooring). I'm talking fills and musicality. Bonham oozed soul. His use of ghosted notes (especially on the kick drum) and triplet feels was legendary.

Don't get me wrong, Peart is great and probably my 4th or 5th favorite rock drummer, but to say Bonham didn't do anything interesting on the drums is simply staggering.

Nothing Special, I'll hand it over to you for the Moon defense.
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Old 11-22-2006, 07:45 PM
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Nah, Bonham's the man. Few rock drummers can groove like Bonham.
One of my first experiences on the internet was a perusal of posts by Who vs. Zeppelin fans in the mid-1900ís. Man, what hatred was flowing back and forth, even then, years after the original bands were long gone.

Sure, Bonham could ďgrooveĒ and his studio performance on numbers like ďMisty Mountain Hopď left one breathless. But I can air-drum that entire one, as well as many others by Bonham, including ďMoby Dick.Ē

I canít air-drum a single number ever done by Moon in itís entirety. That includes 2+ minute numbers like ďCanít Explain.Ē The guy just knew too much and could do it too well, like Hendrix.

Bonham was great, but largely fundamental in his approach. Moon turned the drums into a lead instrument by sheer force.
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