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  #1  
Old 01-05-2007, 07:51 PM
twickster twickster is offline
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Do people still use shorthand?

Does anyone here use shorthand? Or know anyone who does?
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  #2  
Old 01-05-2007, 08:50 PM
Sonia Montdore Sonia Montdore is offline
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I do. One of the most useful skills I ever learned. In grad school I used to take copious, detailed notes in shorthand, then I'd type them up and sell them to other students who'd missed class. Or even to students who'd been in class but were daydreaming. Had a nice little business going there for awhile. Nowadays, I still use it when I take minutes of a committee I serve on.
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  #3  
Old 01-05-2007, 10:28 PM
DJ Motorbike DJ Motorbike is online now
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OMG LOL @ UR post.

Seriously, though the only person I have ever seen use shorthand was a substitute high-school teacher I had for typing class. She was retired and in her younger days was a court stenographer, or something. One day she demonstrated shorthand writing to the class. I found it . . . puzzling.

Forgive me for the leetspeek, I was using it to illustrate a point.
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  #4  
Old 01-05-2007, 10:35 PM
Sage Rat Sage Rat is online now
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My dad's secretary knew shorthand, so she could transcribe meetings and such. She was also a notary, I believe.
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  #5  
Old 01-06-2007, 12:09 AM
dangermom dangermom is offline
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I know a woman who uses it all the time for taking notes in meetings and whatnot. I must say I'm kind of envious of her skill.
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  #6  
Old 01-06-2007, 12:40 AM
Queen Bruin Queen Bruin is offline
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My MiL uses it. I've been thinking of having her teach me for notetaking purposes.
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  #7  
Old 01-06-2007, 02:13 AM
Jophiel Jophiel is offline
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A woman I used to work with knew it and used it for taking notes at the office. She would be in her mid-40s now so she wasn't any relic of the past or anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJ Motorbike
OMG LOL @ UR post.
A girl I sat next to in one of my college classes last semester wrote all of her notes in that text messaging/AOL leet speak shorthand. Mind you, she was writing them all by hand.

"D BSTN T PR-T WAS 2 RBELL CUZ TAX8ION W/O RPRSNT8ION..."
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  #8  
Old 01-06-2007, 04:18 AM
Seven Seven is offline
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My mother was a Kelly Girl during collage and learned shorthand for the gig.

She still uses it today.

I had her show me how it works and it's kind of cool. If I ever wrote lots of things on paper I might bother to learn it.
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  #9  
Old 01-06-2007, 04:20 AM
Seven Seven is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven
My mother was a Kelly Girl during collage and learned shorthand for the gig.
Err. College rather.

My mother never was part of a collage (although she did make a few during her late 70's arty-farty period).
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  #10  
Old 01-06-2007, 07:22 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJ Motorbike
OMG LOL @ UR post.
Careful. You may have to forfeit your membership if you use that kind of language.
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  #11  
Old 01-06-2007, 07:30 AM
AngelicGemma AngelicGemma is offline
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I've learnt it my rarely use it. I studied journalism at university so it seemed like a smart idea.
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  #12  
Old 01-06-2007, 08:17 AM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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My sister learned it and I think she still uses it occasionally. I never did, and I've never had a job that made me regret not learning it.

I wonder if you actually can take a shorthand course anymore. I think it's probably like tribal language. You have to learn directly from an elder and then take an oath to pass it down to the next generation.
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  #13  
Old 01-06-2007, 09:12 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I took it in college as part of a secretarial science course. I love things like calligraphy and languages, so I took to it like a duck to water, and was teacher's pet.

I'm a legal secretary and still use it today, constantly. I take down phone messages and hurried instructions-on-the-fly from any of my five bosses. One of my bosses saw the value of being able to dictate a letter to me just about anywhere, and even though he's ten years younger than me, we still do the boss/secretary "take a letter" thing just like it was thirty years ago.

It's really a very efficient way of doing things. No machinery is needed, no instructions are forgotten because they weren't written down. I'm glad I learned it.

I'm 50, BTW.
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  #14  
Old 01-06-2007, 09:21 AM
twickster twickster is offline
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Interesting answers, all.

The only person I've known personally who knew it was an old boss of mine, who's probably be 80 or so today. My personal system of abbreviations is pretty elaborate, so I can get 95% of a lecture or whatever -- but it's definitely not verbatim.
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  #15  
Old 01-06-2007, 12:41 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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My mother was a secretary and knew shorthand. She's been retired for several years now however and I don't know how if she still remembers it.

I've seen some secretaries at work taking minutes of a meeting in shorthand so the skill is still in use.
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  #16  
Old 01-06-2007, 12:43 PM
tashabot tashabot is offline
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I work in a newsroom. The reporters use it all the time.

I really need to learn it. Writing things out takes forEVER.

~Tasha
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  #17  
Old 01-06-2007, 01:33 PM
Campion Campion is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teela brown
I'm a legal secretary and still use it today, constantly. I take down phone messages and hurried instructions-on-the-fly from any of my five bosses. One of my bosses saw the value of being able to dictate a letter to me just about anywhere, and even though he's ten years younger than me, we still do the boss/secretary "take a letter" thing just like it was thirty years ago.
My secretary, and several others at work, use it. It truly is awesome, because I can dictate a letter to her without slowing down. I wish I knew it; it would make my note taking better during meetings, and it would also be a way for me to take notes in court or depositions without (most) other people being able to tell what I wrote.
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  #18  
Old 01-06-2007, 03:00 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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I know and use it, mostly for writing down things that people tell me to do while I'm in the middle of something else.
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  #19  
Old 01-06-2007, 03:44 PM
JThunder JThunder is offline
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Bh. Shrthnd. Wh th hll nds shrthnd?
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  #20  
Old 01-06-2007, 04:28 PM
AuntiePam AuntiePam is offline
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I learned it in a high school course and used it a lot in my first job, but not much after that -- or at least not in the traditional way. Dictating machines sorta took over. Makes sense to dictate to the machine while the secretary is working on something else.

Wasn't early dictation equipment pretty bulky? I never saw one of the things that you'd talk into, but the transcribing machine we learned on was as big as a typewriter, and the plastic (?) tubey things couldn't have been easy to store.

I wonder if there's an office machine museum somewhere, with spirit duplicators, mimeograph machines, switchboards, and those big clunky floor model adding machines they used in banks.
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  #21  
Old 01-06-2007, 06:28 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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When I was in school I thought shorthand would have been a great skill to use. Of course, fast touch typing would be even more useful, and I haven't learned that, either. How would one learn shorthand anyway?
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  #22  
Old 01-06-2007, 07:49 PM
AuntiePam AuntiePam is offline
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You could easily teach yourself shorthand. Get a Gregg Shorthand manual and do the lessons in the book. Live teacher not needed at all.
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  #23  
Old 01-06-2007, 07:50 PM
tashabot tashabot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee
When I was in school I thought shorthand would have been a great skill to use. Of course, fast touch typing would be even more useful, and I haven't learned that, either. How would one learn shorthand anyway?
Some colleges offer courses in office skills and shorthand is taught. You can also google shorthand -css and get a lot of good primers with links to better primers, like this: http://www.alysion.org/handy/althandwriting.htm.

You can also get books on it at your local library and on amazon.com.

~Tasha
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  #24  
Old 01-06-2007, 07:53 PM
Caridwen Caridwen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee
When I was in school I thought shorthand would have been a great skill to use. Of course, fast touch typing would be even more useful, and I haven't learned that, either. How would one learn shorthand anyway?
I love it! Like Sonia, no one ever had better notes than I did because you don't miss a word.

They still had it when I was in H.S. (I'm 43) and I just fell in love with it. It's like learning a new language. There's something very elegant about it with all the curves and loops.

Very easy to learn if you practice. Even if you use it for simple phrases, it saves time. We used Gregg shorthand

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/shorthand.htm
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  #25  
Old 01-07-2007, 12:02 AM
jabiru jabiru is offline
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I still use it from time to time (Pitman) but not for work, just if I need to take notes quickly. I used it a fair bit when I was at Uni but I found I'd got quite rusty since I hadn't worked in an office in decades so I had to transcribe it the same day or I could fathom what I'd written.
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  #26  
Old 01-07-2007, 03:12 AM
AngelicGemma AngelicGemma is offline
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Can I hijack the thread to ask what type of shorthand everyone has learned?

I know TeeLine.
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  #27  
Old 01-07-2007, 07:07 AM
KSO KSO is offline
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No but I wish I did. My office stocks "Gregg Ruled" shorthand notebooks though so maybe I should teach myself.
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  #28  
Old 01-22-2014, 08:58 AM
jeffreyhughesnc jeffreyhughesnc is offline
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Gregg "Jubilation" edition

I took it in High School during the 80's and was OK at it. I'm a terrible note taker in any method. I did use it quite a bit during college. I moved to France for a few years and lost my efficiency. I've tried to revive it several times with an old Gregg Centennial text book to no avail. I remember my mom having the steno notebooks with Gregg Shorthand lessons on the back cover...Does anyone remember the note paper was a greenish yellow? I think it's still a relevant skill and should still be taught today.
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  #29  
Old 01-22-2014, 09:04 AM
LawMonkey LawMonkey is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuntiePam View Post
Wasn't early dictation equipment pretty bulky? I never saw one of the things that you'd talk into, but the transcribing machine we learned on was as big as a typewriter, and the plastic (?) tubey things couldn't have been easy to store.

I wonder if there's an office machine museum somewhere, with spirit duplicators, mimeograph machines, switchboards, and those big clunky floor model adding machines they used in banks.
Anecdote: When looking through the various memos and such that I got at my first firm, I noticed that they still had dictaphones available on request. I should've requested one at some point, just for shits and giggles.

One of my secretaries at the same firm knew shorthand; I'd very occasionally dictate a short cover letter or similar to her. Handy and quick.

It might conceivably serve me to pick up shorthand for taking notes on phone calls and the like; I write in block lettering, a habit I picked up in a high school drafting class (and a good one; my cursive was always horrible). It's quite legible, but slow.
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  #30  
Old 01-22-2014, 02:36 PM
Mk VII Mk VII is online now
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My mother (83) still uses Pitman shorthand on the occasions when she has to take minutes at a meeting or dictation. She also taught it at college at one time.
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