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Old 02-02-2007, 08:33 PM
Full Metal Lotus Full Metal Lotus is offline
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Whgat would it be like to go through a Transporter? (Star Trek style)

if you went through a Star Trek style "transporter" what would it be like, for you, objectively? Would your "view" of area "A" fade and area "B" suddenly appear? Or what? Your opions and ideas are welcomed!

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FML
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Old 02-02-2007, 08:35 PM
Full Metal Lotus Full Metal Lotus is offline
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YIKES..sorry dumb Typo.. I obviously meant "What would it be like to go through a transporter"... Obviously a transporter error......
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Old 02-02-2007, 08:41 PM
Der Trihs Der Trihs is offline
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As I remember from one episode, you feel like you are in a sparkly void, then reappear; it was the one where Barclay was having fits over something he saw while in transport.

Last edited by Der Trihs; 02-02-2007 at 08:41 PM.
  #4  
Old 02-02-2007, 08:49 PM
Frylock Frylock is offline
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You would be standing on a transporter pad. The person in front of you would push a button. You'd see some sparkly's floating around you. Then you'd lose consciousness. The end.

Mark me down for the shuttlecraft, please.

-FrL-
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Old 02-02-2007, 08:53 PM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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In some of the TNG episodes, the characters continue moving as they dematerialise; in at least one case, Picard carries on talking when he's only half there. So if you're active and conscious while you're being taken apart, I think that would sting a bit - Starfleet academy must include a 'stiff upper lip during transporter travel' training module.
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Old 02-02-2007, 09:03 PM
Darryl Lict Darryl Lict is offline
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I would think that you would see a sparkly average of your source and destination. You would, however maintain the initial conditions of your source location. That is to say, if you went from the north pole to the equator you'd be shivering until the tropics warmed you up.

For physical phenomena, you'd experience a change in environmental factors directly proportional to the amount of matter exchanged between locations. If you are transfered from areas of different gravities, you'd start feeling heavier/lighter in direct proportion to the amount of mass transfer. If you transferred from you're bathroom to a lilac field, you'd smell a transition from farts to lilacs. Unless you are like me, because my farts smell like lilacs, you wouldn't notice a difference.
  #7  
Old 02-02-2007, 09:06 PM
Miller Miller is online now
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It's hideous, agonizing death every time. You never know it, though, because the "you" that comes out the other end is a copy made just a few picoseconds before the disintegration.
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Old 02-02-2007, 09:09 PM
jlrepka jlrepka is offline
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I teleported home one night
with Bill and Sue and Meg;
Bill stole Meggie's heart away
and I got Susie's leg...
  #9  
Old 02-02-2007, 09:24 PM
Khan Khan is offline
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Aldebaran's great, OK,
Algol's pretty neat,
Betelgeuse's pretty girls,
Will knock you off your feet.
They'll do anything you like,
Real fast and then real slow,
But if you have to take me apart to get me there,
Then I don't want to go.

Take me apart, take me apart,
What a way to roam,
And if you have to take me apart to get me there,
I'd rather stay at home.
  #10  
Old 02-02-2007, 10:12 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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To find out, we need to get Jason Statham to swallow a pill-sized camera....
  #11  
Old 02-03-2007, 12:58 AM
Diceman Diceman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miller
It's hideous, agonizing death every time. You never know it, though, because the "you" that comes out the other end is a copy made just a few picoseconds before the disintegration.
This is the camp I'm in. You die, and the machine replicates a clone of you who carries on your life at the "destination" location. From the clone's POV, however, (he thinks he's the same person who was disintegrated) he'd probably remember a quick "jump," like if you're watching a movie and the scene shifts suddenly. Or to use a Trek example, it would be like how Q snaps his fingers, and stuff just appears or disappears. Your new environment would appear just like that.

Notwithstanding that one episode, the idea that you could remain conscious during teleportation is silly. You don't have a body during teleportation! At that moment, you're just a huge data file listing where the various atoms of your body were located at the moment teleportation began. What are you supposed to be seeing, hearing, etcetera, with?
  #12  
Old 02-03-2007, 01:13 AM
Autolycus Autolycus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diceman
What are you supposed to be seeing, hearing, etcetera?
A billion chinese all jumping off chairs and the sound of one hand clapping?

I got nothin'
  #13  
Old 02-03-2007, 01:24 AM
Liberal Liberal is offline
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It'd just be a crossfade, I think.
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Old 02-03-2007, 01:26 AM
thirdname thirdname is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miller
It's hideous, agonizing death every time. You never know it, though, because the "you" that comes out the other end is a copy made just a few picoseconds before the disintegration.
There was an Outer Limits (the newer series) episode based around an idea like this. People were teleported by being copied, and there was someone who had to kill the original. There was some sort of confusion, like they didn't get an acknowlegement of receipt, so they didnt know what to do.
SPOILER:
I think that the technician got to know the original and fell in love or something, during the time when they were waiting to figure out what happened. It's been a very long time though so I'm not sure.

Does anyone remember what episode that was?
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Old 02-03-2007, 08:23 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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Ford: "You'd better be prepared for the jump into hyperspace. It's unpleasantly like being drunk."
Arthur: "What's so unpleasant about being drunk?"
Ford: "You ask a glass of water."
  #16  
Old 02-03-2007, 09:01 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frylock

Mark me down for the shuttlecraft, please.

-FrL-
The shuttlecraft! Seems like every time an episode starts with folks getting into a shuttlecraft, disaster ensues. It malfunctions, it crashes, it enters into some kind of horrific energy field and is trapped, you name it.

I guess I'd take the transporter, even if Barclay saw some things in the enegy stream that looked like big turds with mouths.
  #17  
Old 02-03-2007, 09:26 AM
chrisk chrisk is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teela brown
The shuttlecraft! Seems like every time an episode starts with folks getting into a shuttlecraft, disaster ensues. It malfunctions, it crashes, it enters into some kind of horrific energy field and is trapped, you name it.

I guess I'd take the transporter, even if Barclay saw some things in the enegy stream that looked like big turds with mouths.
I think you really do take after Teela Brown of known space... considering that her 'good luck' was sufficient to crashland an entire spacecraft... and she got herself lost among an alien city's teleporting 'stepping disks'
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Old 02-03-2007, 10:10 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
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If Stephen King (and a subsequent Outer Limits episode) is to be believed, your consciousness takes forever to make the trip your body did instantaneously...
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Old 02-03-2007, 10:21 AM
Spatial Rift 47 Spatial Rift 47 is offline
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The established Star Trek method is that you don't die. Unless you count being disassembled dying - but you are then brought back from the dead in a matter of milliseconds. The way they've said it works is that your subatomic particles are simply up and moved to a new place.

I don't think you would remain conscious during this. However, the portion during which you would lose consciousness maybe so short, on the order of a tenth of a second, that your brain could easily fill in the gap and make you think you remained conscious.
  #20  
Old 02-03-2007, 12:33 PM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spatial Rift 47
The established Star Trek method is that you don't die. Unless you count being disassembled dying.
You don't count being disassembled dying?
  #21  
Old 02-03-2007, 01:09 PM
chappachula chappachula is offline
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did anybody else notice that in the very earliest episodes of the original Star Trek, every actor had to stand in a certain location to get beamed back up?

It's been decades, but I remember saying to myself, "boy, that looks silly".

When 5 people beamed down, they all stood at equal distances from each other on their little round platforms in the transporter room.
And when they were beamed back up, they stepped into the same formation-- standing on the ground in the same order and at exactly the right distances between them, so they returned to the same platforms in the transporter room.

I think that only lasted for a couple episodes. But I really don't remember.
  #22  
Old 02-03-2007, 04:11 PM
Grrr! Grrr! is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chappachula
did anybody else notice that in the very earliest episodes of the original Star Trek, every actor had to stand in a certain location to get beamed back up?

It's been decades, but I remember saying to myself, "boy, that looks silly".

When 5 people beamed down, they all stood at equal distances from each other on their little round platforms in the transporter room.
And when they were beamed back up, they stepped into the same formation-- standing on the ground in the same order and at exactly the right distances between them, so they returned to the same platforms in the transporter room.

I think that only lasted for a couple episodes. But I really don't remember.

I've always been bothered by: Why the fuck do they even need a transporter room or pad more specifically in the first place?

Also, about 70% of the times they beam down to the planet; they have to walk a hundred miles to get to where they want! Why not just beam them to where they need to go in the first place.
  #23  
Old 02-03-2007, 04:56 PM
Khampelf Khampelf is offline
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Hey, ftg, Khan, and jlrepka, you gonna give Douglas Adams his due credit, or what?

**Rolls up combat towel and looks menacing.**
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Old 02-03-2007, 07:40 PM
jlrepka jlrepka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sonoran Lizard King
Hey, ftg, Khan, and jlrepka, you gonna give Douglas Adams his due credit, or what?

**Rolls up combat towel and looks menacing.**
Absolutely... he said, sheepishly. All lyrics are from The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1982) by Douglas N. Adams (as he described himself: the other DNA that appeared in Cambridge in 1952).
  #25  
Old 02-03-2007, 08:03 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SHAKES
I've always been bothered by: Why the fuck do they even need a transporter room or pad more specifically in the first place?
[FanWank]It's easier to find your target, as it were, with a transporter pad. I remember that intership beaming was dangerous in Kirk's day. It is also probably less disorienting for those being transported if they stand in relation to each other as they will be on the pad.
I can see Spock and Kirk switching places at the last moment, though, to piss off McCoy. "SPOCK! JIM!" "Doctor, you have urinated on your trousers."[/FanWank]

Last edited by carnivorousplant; 02-03-2007 at 08:05 PM.
  #26  
Old 02-03-2007, 08:26 PM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SHAKES
Also, about 70% of the times they beam down to the planet; they have to walk a hundred miles to get to where they want! Why not just beam them to where they need to go in the first place.
Localised ion storms in the upper atmosphere, beta-tachyon emissions from a large mineral deposit near the target site, Quantum resonances in the...whatever, planetary defence shields, all sorts of reasons.
  #27  
Old 02-03-2007, 08:36 PM
Cartooniverse Cartooniverse is offline
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God damn, you are my hero.





I see it as the same technology used to wash the clothing on the Enterprise. Seriously. The way they wash the clothing is that it is put into a device that removes everything that is not in the original imprint, then re-creates it anew.

Of course, if that logic was properly adhered to, in the worlds of Star Trek, disease would be nonexistant since if somoene got sick, you could beam them out and back and create a version of themselves without the disease.

Hmmm !!!

Cartooniverse
  #28  
Old 02-03-2007, 08:46 PM
Stranger On A Train Stranger On A Train is offline
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From any technical standpoint, a matter transporter of the Star Trek variety is so much garbage. When they've disintegrated a substantial portion of the crewman, how does the rest of him not just splatter on the floor in a puddle of protoplasm and skeletal residue? How do you rebuild an entire body, one atom at a time, at great range and differential velocity without Doppler shift or interference screwing up your signal? How do you keep from rematerializing your crewman with a bunch of extra air--or worse, in the case of the rare non-"M class" planet with a toxic atmosphere--embedded in him? Oh, sure, you can invoke "force fields" and "subspace transmissions" but that just brings a whole new layer of bullshititude into the rationale. Trek is pure space opera, written by people who have only the faintest grasp of science, and at best a vehicle for interesting allegorical concepts.

My answer to the O.P.--assuming the process works as advertized, and kinetic energy is somehow compensated by the system--is that you'd feel yourself fainting from low blood pressure and/or disappearing neural connections, pass out, and then re-awaken on the planet feeling slightly drained (like a whole-body bruise) with no memory of the process. Do this enough times and I think your head would be scrambled, with attendent memory and functional problems. In the long run, small but systemic mistakes in gene coding during transport will result in high rates of cancer and nervous system disorders. Mr. Scott, I'll remain here on the surface and face down the Furious Decapitator Beast of Rula Delta IV. At least I have some chance at remaining in few enough pieces to put back together for the funeral.

The shuttlecraft don't seem to be that hot, either; they seem to have a worse record of catastrophic accidents than the Ford Pinto. Personally, I think it's due to the obviously technophobic attitude of humanity in the 24th Century; it's like the whole show is a big Apple Switch campaign:
When I used to command a Klingon Bird-of-Prey, there were all these levers and buttons and you had to do math and stuff to 'lay in a course'. It was sooo confusing. [waves hands around] Who wants to spend your duty shift doing trigonometry and uploading course corrections? But with Federation vessels, you just point it where you want to go, hit a single button, and there you are! My name is Capt. Janie Porche, and I saved the galaxy!
The computer is clearly capable of doing anything that doesn't actually require climbing down a Jeffries tube (and it should be able to do that except for the inexplicable dearth of semi-autonomous robots and remote probes) and yet, they have to crew an entire star ship with hundreds of delicate organic mechanisms with very limited processing power using a slow and crude electronic-to-optical-to-tactile-to-electronic interface. Heck, even when they have the ideal crew replacement andriod, they disable his Bluetooth/WiMAX functionality in favor of the same crude interface and communication systems everybody else has to use, presumably in some futile effort to make everyone exactly equal. What's the deal with that?

Stranger
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Old 02-03-2007, 08:58 PM
Spatial Rift 47 Spatial Rift 47 is offline
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You know, Stranger, it's really tough to keep my disbelief suspended with you attaching weights to it like that. Cut it out.
  #30  
Old 02-03-2007, 09:03 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spatial Rift 47
it's really tough to keep my disbelief suspended with you attaching weights to it like that.
Yeah, next he'll be talking about traveling faster than light. ^ ^
  #31  
Old 02-03-2007, 09:15 PM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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I always thought it felt like drinking gingerale.
  #32  
Old 02-03-2007, 09:17 PM
Stranger On A Train Stranger On A Train is offline
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant
Yeah, next he'll be talking about traveling faster than light. ^ ^
Hey, that's no problem. You just have to find some way to make the Alcubierre Drive a reality. Oh, and you'll need a really massive energy source--probably something like a medium sized star--and a way to produce gross quantities of exotic, negative energy density matter. This is an almost trivial feat compared to rendering a body atom for atom and reproducing it to immeasurable exactitude thousands of miles away.

Stranger
  #33  
Old 02-03-2007, 09:19 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing
You don't count being disassembled dying?
Disassemble... dead... disassemble... dead....


NO NO DISASSEMBLE NUMBER FIVE!!!
  #34  
Old 02-03-2007, 11:17 PM
cmyk cmyk is offline
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It tastes like burning.

AND

(and)

We'd ask the baboon, but he's inside-out. Literally.

Speaking of which, according to Seth Brundle, it feels like a hiccup.

Of the Star Trek style transporter, I'd think the atmospheric pressure differential would blow out their ear drums and give them the bends most of the time. They'd be writhing in pain too much to care about the cool cross-fade effect.
  #35  
Old 02-03-2007, 11:55 PM
astorian astorian is online now
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One of my favorite Stephen King stories, "The Jaunt," offers one answer to the OP's question.
  #36  
Old 02-04-2007, 12:30 AM
cmyk cmyk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian
One of my favorite Stephen King stories, "The Jaunt," offers one answer to the OP's question.
I LOVE that story. Sometimes I fantasize about the horror of being trapped for billions upon billions of years in blackness with just my own unblinking consciousness. ::shivers::
  #37  
Old 02-04-2007, 12:58 AM
SenorBeef SenorBeef is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riker1384
There was an Outer Limits (the newer series) episode based around an idea like this. People were teleported by being copied, and there was someone who had to kill the original. There was some sort of confusion, like they didn't get an acknowlegement of receipt, so they didnt know what to do.
SPOILER:
I think that the technician got to know the original and fell in love or something, during the time when they were waiting to figure out what happened. It's been a very long time though so I'm not sure.

Does anyone remember what episode that was?
Yes.

Season 7
138. Think Like A Dinosaur
Original airdate: June 15, 2001
Based on a short story by: James Patrick Kelly
Written by: Mark Stern
Directed by: Jorge Montesi
Guest stars: Enrico Colantoni, Linnea Sharples, David Lewis
Featuring: Peter Grier, Scott McNeil
Synopsis: One human is the only permanent occupant of a station located on a vast empty plain of the moon. His companions are an emotionless lizard-like alien species who have developed a highly advanced means of long distance travel by 'jumping' through space.

Based on this short story by James Patrick Kelly.

If I recall correctly, what happened was
SPOILER:


The machine that did the transporting was supposed to destroy the original body upon receiving a confirmation that the data had arrived properly. But there was a technical glitch which resulted in there being no confirmation, so the body wasn't eliminated. Eventually, they found out that the transmission did indeed go through - so that there were now 2 of this person. The aliens were very insistent that the original be eliminated, so they forced their human liason to kill the original.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cartooniverse
Of course, if that logic was properly adhered to, in the worlds of Star Trek, disease would be nonexistant since if somoene got sick, you could beam them out and back and create a version of themselves without the disease.

Cartooniverse
Haven't they done this once or twice... and then forgot about it?

Last edited by SenorBeef; 02-04-2007 at 01:03 AM.
  #38  
Old 02-04-2007, 01:51 AM
Terrifel Terrifel is offline
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Originally Posted by cmyk
I LOVE that story. Sometimes I fantasize about the horror of being trapped for billions upon billions of years in blackness with just my own unblinking consciousness. ::shivers::
I think Stephen King described it as "an eternity of white" or something along those lines. Of course in Star Trek it would necessarily be sparkling white. However, there's a little-known transporter subroutine that erases the by-then-totally-insane consciousness during rematerialization and replaces it with a copy of the original, so it's all good.

I remember being strangely perplexed by the bit in the (first? second?) movie where the actors carried on their conversation during transport, and the way that their voices got all tinny and such. Of course it makes exactly as much sense that you could be transported while clog-dancing or whatever, but I'd been subconsciously trained by the series to accept that transport would fail catastrophically if you weren't holding perfectly still with your feet firmly planted. And what was with that weirdly blobby transporter effect in the first movie? That was just so wrong.

After much consideration of this topic as a child, I decided that being transported would probably look like a double-exposed photo, with the sparkle effect also INSIDE your eyeballs, like the phosphene effects of a migraine headache. Some may argue that the one TNG episode disproved this theory, but that was from the perspective of Dwight Schultz' character, and I submit that his perceptions may not be representative of most organisms'.

Also, being transported leaves a metallic aftertaste, like putting your tongue on a battery.
  #39  
Old 02-04-2007, 07:44 AM
chrisk chrisk is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cartooniverse
Of course, if that logic was properly adhered to, in the worlds of Star Trek, disease would be nonexistant since if somoene got sick, you could beam them out and back and create a version of themselves without the disease.
Actually, IIRC, it's not QUITE that easy. (For one thing, with a person's pattern, you can't eliminate all changes from the original pattern, because that would mean the person hasn't grown or retained any memories since then, and it's impossible to nail down a living intelligent person to an old pattern even then, because the Heisenberg compensators generally would get overloaded.)

But they do have 'biofilters' - software routines to look for hostile bacteria, viri, and other disease agents in a transporter pattern and excise them. Biofilters have indeed been used for non-transportation medical reasons.

The problem with them, though, is that there are some syndromes that are hard to recognize because they disguise themselves as part of the host body, down to the genetic level.
  #40  
Old 02-04-2007, 08:13 AM
Uzi Uzi is offline
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I always wondered why if they beam an away team to the surface of some planet and the guy in the red shirt gets killed, why don't they just reassemble him from a pattern that any good techie would keep on record for just such emergencies? Really, if you can put someone into a pattern buffer you can save him onto the hard drive for later retrieval.
  #41  
Old 02-04-2007, 09:36 AM
chrisk chrisk is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uzi
I always wondered why if they beam an away team to the surface of some planet and the guy in the red shirt gets killed, why don't they just reassemble him from a pattern that any good techie would keep on record for just such emergencies? Really, if you can put someone into a pattern buffer you can save him onto the hard drive for later retrieval.
That, I believe, is explained with the Heisenberg compensator thing. Patterns with thinking brains in them cannot be stored for hours or even that many minutes with sufficent fidelity - they almost always have to be transported 'live' (though Scotty famously found a way to get around that - but even his method was only half genius.)

Otherwise, if you tried, you'd find out that all of the atoms were reconstructed fine, and each atom had the right number of electrons, but the electrons didn't have the same position and/or velocity as in the original sample. For most of a person's body, that doesn't matter, but in the brain the electron stuff would add up to an unstable shift in mental state. Instant transporter psychosis - the red shirt guy would be brought back crazy, and probably try to assasinate Kirk at the worst possible moment.

  #42  
Old 02-04-2007, 10:04 AM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisk
the red shirt guy would be brought back crazy, and probably try to assasinate Kirk at the worst possible moment.
You say that like its a bad thing.
  #43  
Old 02-04-2007, 11:39 AM
SenorBeef SenorBeef is offline
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Well, his shirt would certainly get torn, and that's such a pain for the tailors.

Last edited by SenorBeef; 02-04-2007 at 11:39 AM. Reason: Where has my spelling gone lately?
  #44  
Old 02-04-2007, 12:54 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Really, if you can put someone into a pattern buffer you can save him onto the hard drive for later retrieval.
That's simple enough to explain. Since the pattern buffer stores quantum information, in order to get the information from the pattern buffer to another form (like, say, a living material body) you have to delete the information from the buffer in the process. This could also, in principle, solve the famous problems with the Heisenberg principle: The information is never actually measured classically. So you could store a person indefinitely, but you won't have a copy of him running around on the planet's surface.
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  #45  
Old 02-04-2007, 01:23 PM
Terrifel Terrifel is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos
So you could store a person indefinitely, but you won't have a copy of him running around on the planet's surface.
Except for those times when it happens anyway.

Maybe it's more like Schrodinger's cat; when transporting, you exist simultaneously in two superimposed quantum states, so that you can be both alive on the ship and dead on the planet, as long as nobody observes either one of you in a red shirt, unless one of you is made of antimatter, in which case the other one will have to be evil, at which point the waveform collapses into either a bearded or beardless state.

I wonder if Schrodinger's wife ever knitted a red shirt for the cat.
  #46  
Old 02-04-2007, 01:44 PM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrifel
I wonder if Schrodinger's wife ever knitted a red shirt for the cat.
She might have, but there's no way for us to know.
  #47  
Old 02-05-2007, 02:09 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Since people are hijacking this thread with Hitchhiker quotes I thought I'd mention that in an old JLA comic Jade and Wonder Woman hint that being transported feels like a orgasm!
  #48  
Old 02-05-2007, 02:31 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is online now
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Heck, you can infer that from a Harlequin romance...
  #49  
Old 02-05-2007, 04:10 PM
Lightray Lightray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmyk
Of the Star Trek style transporter, I'd think the atmospheric pressure differential would blow out their ear drums and give them the bends most of the time. They'd be writhing in pain too much to care about the cool cross-fade effect.
It's unlikely that their pain will last all that long, though. What with either being spontaneously combusted or frozen solid from the change in their potential energy (from orbit to planetside, likely to be quite a fair bit of difference), and then being flung off to the far horizon since their acceleration frame-of-reference on the ship can't be the same as that of the planet, so they'll be moving at a different speed relative to the ground...

Yah, yah, i know, Heisenberg compensators.

Quote:
Originally Posted by teela brown
I guess I'd take the transporter, even if Barclay saw some things in the enegy stream that looked like big turds with mouths.
Didn't the mouthy turds actually turn out to be people trapped in the matter stream. ISTR that Reg had to grab on to one of 'em mid-transport, causing all kinds of hijinks at the transporter counsel.

Which would make the entire transporter experience ever so much ookier: (1) you're dissolved, (2) you're turned into a floating turd with teeth in sparkly space, (3) you re-materialize only to have your eardrums explode, spontaneously burst into flames, and be flung into the nearest mountains at thousands of kph with a very nice sonic boom.

Sign me up for the shuttlecraft, too, plz.
  #50  
Old 02-05-2007, 04:17 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightray
It's unlikely that their pain will last all that long, though.
Onthe whole, I'd rather travel at warp 10 and turn into a newt.

No. No, on the whole I'd rather be in Philadelphia.
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