The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-02-2007, 12:14 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Origin of slang "redonk" (short for "redonkulous") meaning "ridiculous"

The title is pretty much the question. I've heard this term orally for maybe 2 years. I saw it for the first time in print on another message board about a month ago. Can't say "redonk" is ubiquitous just yet ... but I'm wondering whether it's part of some very recent pop culture that I may have missed.
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 03-02-2007, 12:47 PM
Jayrot Jayrot is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
I think it's just people playing around with common words to make them sound funny.

I also hear "recockulous" and "ridicurous".
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-02-2007, 12:56 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Tysons Corner, VA, USA
Posts: 9,654
Don't be dickless, Lucy!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-02-2007, 01:04 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayrot
I think it's just people playing around with common words to make them sound funny.
True, true. I still wonder if "redonk"/"redonkulous" has appeared in a recent movie, TV show, song, or something like that. Heck, these days, a video game or well-read blog can probably popularize slang.

I've been finding over the past 5 years or so that a lot of what looks like "playing with words" actually had been popularized in some form of media. For instance -- People. Writing. Sentences. Like. This. -- actually came from the Comic Book Guy on The Simpsons (I don't watch much ... I'll assume that CBG Talks. In. Pauses.).
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-02-2007, 01:12 PM
Autolycus Autolycus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Ainran
Posts: 11,449
Perhaps it's origin is tied in to the phrase "badonkadonk" or "It's on like Donkey Kong" ?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-02-2007, 01:20 PM
samclem samclem is offline
graphite is a great moderator
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 21,572
All I can contribute is that it first appears on Usenet in 1999.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-02-2007, 03:39 PM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 23,384
David Spade may have revived its popularity by his repeated use of it on his Show Biz Show.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-02-2007, 03:53 PM
Joey P Joey P is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 21,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayrot
I think it's just people playing around with common words to make them sound funny.

I also hear "recockulous" and "ridicurous".

[Seinfeld]Wait a minute....did you ..... say ..... ridicurous?[/js]
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-02-2007, 03:58 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Sweet Home Chicago
Posts: 30,193
It's also all over www.cuteoverload.com, along with some of my other favorite non-words like 'snorgle", "muzzlepuff" and "pawsitude".
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-02-2007, 03:59 PM
Quiddity Glomfuster Quiddity Glomfuster is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
That annoying little gnome creature from whatever online service uses it. I haven't heard it otherwise. I hate him.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-02-2007, 04:03 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autolycus
Perhaps it's origin is tied in to the phrase "badonkadonk" ...
See, there's another example right there of the same thing. My hip, young sister-in-law uses this word (or is it "bading-adang-dong?") to refer to country music, NASCAR, small towns, and rurality in general.

I thought "badonkadonk"/"bading-adang-dong" was a just a play on the sound of a banjo or something, until I heard that it came from a recent hit country song. Of course, the song might have come after the term ... probably did, as a matter of fact.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-02-2007, 04:45 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Anderson, IN,USA
Posts: 13,983
Playing around with "ridiculous" is not new. Albert Alligator, in the long-defunct comic strip Pogo, complained that something was "ree-dickle-wockle."
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-02-2007, 07:05 PM
Kimstu Kimstu is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott
Albert Alligator, in the long-defunct comic strip Pogo, complained that something was "ree-dickle-wockle."
But Pogo used that kind of bizarre artificial elaboration for all kinds of words in the dialect of its Okefenokee swamp-critter characters, not just "ridiculous" in particular. Similar phrases I can think of just off the top of my head include "a big political assassifrassination", "automobobble", and "dangerest".
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-02-2007, 07:14 PM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Tornado Alley
Posts: 10,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond
See, there's another example right there of the same thing. My hip, young sister-in-law uses this word (or is it "bading-adang-dong?") to refer to country music, NASCAR, small towns, and rurality in general.

I thought "badonkadonk"/"bading-adang-dong" was a just a play on the sound of a banjo or something, until I heard that it came from a recent hit country song. Of course, the song might have come after the term ... probably did, as a matter of fact.
Actually "[URL=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badonkadonk]badonkadonk[URL]" is something completely different.

Last edited by samclem; 09-08-2011 at 06:25 PM.. Reason: made link not clickable.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-03-2007, 10:37 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by foolsguinea
Actually "badonkadonk" is something completely different.


I'm just too old to keep up, I tell ya!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-23-2010, 01:09 PM
jconny jconny is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
The first time I heard it was on the sit-com "How I met your mother", they said it in at the start of the second session
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-24-2010, 07:19 AM
chromaticity chromaticity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot View Post
It's also all over www.cuteoverload.com, along with some of my other favorite non-words like 'snorgle", "muzzlepuff" and "pawsitude".
Yeah! Thats where I heard this for the first time.
muzzlepousche...hehe
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-24-2010, 08:16 AM
DSeid DSeid is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by foolsguinea View Post
Actually "badonkadonk" is something completely different.
Not so completely different - the country song was "Honkytonk Badonkadonk" which may have been referring to a girl's nice backside while she danced to Honkytonk, but the apparent hipster use of the term comes from the association with that song and making it mean honkytonk. And slang means as slang is used.

Last edited by DSeid; 03-24-2010 at 08:16 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-24-2010, 08:22 AM
bouv bouv is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
I assumed it was because dong is a slang term for dick, like cock is. So similar to how recockulous is used because cock is slang for dick, redonculous is used as well. The 'g' gets dropped off, but it's still there in spirit.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-24-2010, 08:45 AM
muttrox muttrox is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 2,027
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
I've been finding over the past 5 years or so that a lot of what looks like "playing with words" actually had been popularized in some form of media. For instance -- People. Writing. Sentences. Like. This. -- actually came from the Comic Book Guy on The Simpsons (I don't watch much ... I'll assume that CBG Talks. In. Pauses.).
Comic Book Guy got it from comics (surprise!). Imagine the hero struggling so hard that they can only get out one word at a time. Must... fight... off... raygun... effects!! Where... is... Robin? Can't... reach... button...!

Didn't Balki on Perfect Strangers have fun with "ridiculous"?
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-24-2010, 11:02 AM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
In the early 90s we had the redonkulous scale for rating women's hotness around the fraternity house. It was mostly nonsense, with lots of modifiers, and double negatives to further confuse the issue. It was all in good fun then, and I'm not sure where it came from, but the word as a concept has been around since at least then. I'm not going to presume that it spawned it's popularity our of our living room, 20 years later.

Someone in show biz somehow must have started using it, and now it's out there.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-14-2010, 11:00 PM
Redonk creator Redonk creator is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
I created it. 4 yrs ago. It was crazy to see it grow! Websters here we come.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-15-2010, 12:25 AM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond
See, there's another example right there of the same thing. My hip, young sister-in-law uses this word (or is it "bading-adang-dong?") to refer to country music, NASCAR, small towns, and rurality in general.

I thought "badonkadonk"/"bading-adang-dong" was a just a play on the sound of a banjo or something, until I heard that it came from a recent hit country song. Of course, the song might have come after the term ... probably did, as a matter of fact.
The banjo sound in my experience is reminiscent of the dueling banjos sound from the movie Deliverence. It can be applied (negatively) to all things red neck and country, but unless youíre an asshole its usually reserved for just creepy rural situations.

It has nothing to do with badonkadunk, which is a nice ass
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-15-2010, 05:55 AM
shellofmyformerself shellofmyformerself is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
If I'm not mistaken, "redonkulous" was also used by one of the pigeons in the kid's movie "Bolt".
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-15-2010, 07:34 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: 847 mi. from Cecil
Posts: 28,638
Quote:
Originally Posted by muttrox View Post
Comic Book Guy got it from comics (surprise!). Imagine the hero struggling so hard that they can only get out one word at a time. Must... fight... off... raygun... effects!! Where... is... Robin? Can't... reach... button...!
The only time I've heard CBG talk like that is when he says, "Worst. Episode. Ever" or variations on that. Seems like it is done for emphasis, not emulation of superheros.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-15-2010, 07:59 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Hub of the sports world
Posts: 14,790
Quote:
Originally Posted by muttrox View Post
Didn't Balki on Perfect Strangers have fun with "ridiculous"?
Well, of course not, don't be ridiculous.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-15-2010, 09:13 AM
Hampshire Hampshire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 9,378
You guys are being ri-god-damn-diculous.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-15-2010, 04:19 PM
TBG TBG is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayrot View Post
I think it's just people playing around with common words to make them sound funny.

I also hear "recockulous" and "ridicurous".
Unlike redonkulous, there's more to those than just sounding funny. Recockulous is replacing dic[k] with cock. Joey P already covered ridicurous earlier in the thread.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-15-2010, 05:34 PM
Bad Astronaut Bad Astronaut is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quiddity Glomfuster View Post
That annoying little gnome creature from whatever online service uses it. I haven't heard it otherwise. I hate him.
I was going to post this as well (the Expedia gnome used it in one or more TV commercials). I think it was probably at least 5 years ago. I don't recall hearing 'redonkulous' before that.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-15-2010, 09:44 PM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Ass end of Alberta
Posts: 17,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by bouv View Post
I assumed it was because dong is a slang term for dick, like cock is. So similar to how recockulous is used because cock is slang for dick, redonculous is used as well. The 'g' gets dropped off, but it's still there in spirit.
This is my assumption. (Coupled with the extra length and girth that "dong" connotes as to apposed to mere "dick.")
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 10-16-2010, 02:20 AM
mittu mittu is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayrot
I think it's just people playing around with common words to make them sound funny.
True, true. I still wonder if "redonk"/"redonkulous" has appeared in a recent movie, TV show, song, or something like that. Heck, these days, a video game or well-read blog can probably popularize slang.
It was used in The Big Bang Theory as well.

Quote:
Raj: Thatís what youíre wearing.

Penny: Um, yeah, why whatís wrong with it?

Raj: Nothing, I was just hoping for something a little more, you know, redonkulous.

Penny: Yeah, well, this is all the donkulous youíre gonna get.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-16-2010, 02:34 AM
srzss05 srzss05 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Astronaut View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quiddity Glomfuster View Post
That annoying little gnome creature from whatever online service uses it. I haven't heard it otherwise. I hate him.
I was going to post this as well (the Expedia gnome used it in one or more TV commercials). I think it was probably at least 5 years ago. I don't recall hearing 'redonkulous' before that.
Seeing as this is a zombie thread from 3 years ago, that's about right.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-16-2010, 12:10 PM
11811 11811 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
[QUOTE=bordelond;8315685]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autolycus
<snip>My hip, young sister-in-law uses this word (or is it "bading-adang-dong?") to refer to country music, NASCAR, small towns, and rurality in general.
<snip>
I think she's thinking of "podunk."
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 10-16-2010, 01:34 PM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: A better place to be
Posts: 26,718
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autolycus
Perhaps it's origin is tied in to the phrase "badonkadonk" ...
See, there's another example right there of the same thing. My hip, young sister-in-law uses this word (or is it "bading-adang-dong?") to refer to country music, NASCAR, small towns, and rurality in general.

I thought "badonkadonk"/"bading-adang-dong" was a just a play on the sound of a banjo or something, until I heard that it came from a recent hit country song. Of course, the song might have come after the term ... probably did, as a matter of fact.
This may connect (though which is cause and which effect is debatable) with country singer Trace Atkins' song Honky Tonk Badonkadonk (Link to Youtube video.)

Urban Dictionary (of slang; reader-created) connects it to (female) buttocks and/or to genitalia ... but then, a wide variety of otherwise innocuous terms are used slangily with one or both of those meanings.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 10-16-2010, 09:05 PM
Autolycus Autolycus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Ainran
Posts: 11,449
Muff cabbage.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 09-08-2011, 07:37 AM
Cayuga Cayuga is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Wow. My first zombie resurrection.

The earliest use that the guy on the Freakonomics blog could find was in Roald Dahl's The BFG. It's a variant spelling, and in context, it sure seems as if Dahl was making it up.

Quote:
"Redunculus and um-possible," the BFG said.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 09-08-2011, 08:42 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,378
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
I've been finding over the past 5 years or so that a lot of what looks like "playing with words" actually had been popularized in some form of media. For instance -- People. Writing. Sentences. Like. This. -- actually came from the Comic Book Guy on The Simpsons (I don't watch much ... I'll assume that CBG Talks. In. Pauses.).
He doesn't always talk in pauses. There was a specific episode -- "The Itchy and Scratchy and Poochie Show" -- in which he posted the review "Worst. Episode. Ever." on the internet. And I seem to recall that we saw it in print with the periods.

I'm certain I encountered that speech and writing pattern long before Comic Book Guy, but that episode did set off a wave of popularity for it.

Last edited by Acsenray; 09-08-2011 at 08:42 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 09-10-2011, 09:34 PM
Petey Petey is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Posts: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
He doesn't always talk in pauses. There was a specific episode -- "The Itchy and Scratchy and Poochie Show" -- in which he posted the review "Worst. Episode. Ever." on the internet. And I seem to recall that we saw it in print with the periods.

I'm certain I encountered that speech and writing pattern long before Comic Book Guy, but that episode did set off a wave of popularity for it.
The method of speaking with short bursts and pauses is often used to imitate William Shatner on Star Trek. It was used by the MST3K guys in 1989's "The Crawling Hand". It was probably used long before them.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.