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  #1  
Old 06-01-2007, 11:17 PM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
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Do swimming pools still have high dives?

When I was a kid (in the 1970s) every swimming pool - even public pools - had a "high dive" and a "low dive." I'm not sure how high the hive dives were, but I would estimate 10 feet. Had lots of fun diving off of them.

The high dives seem to have disappeared from the pools around here. Why?
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  #2  
Old 06-01-2007, 11:25 PM
blondebear blondebear is online now
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I bemoaned the passing of diving boards last year. Lawsuits and high insurance rates have killed them off, I'm afraid.

When I drive cross-country, I'm always on the lookout for public swimming pools that still have diving boards. One of my favorites was Riverside Park in Miles City, Montana.
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  #3  
Old 06-01-2007, 11:31 PM
John DiFool John DiFool is offline
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Yeah, as blondebear said, even the low dives are pretty much a thing of the past. Only a high school or other educational establishment (or YMCA et al.) has them anymore.

Did anyone ever personally know anyone who got hurt jumping off one-high or low or whatever?

Last edited by John DiFool; 06-01-2007 at 11:32 PM..
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  #4  
Old 06-01-2007, 11:47 PM
WoodenTaco WoodenTaco is offline
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Uhh, I'm not sure that they're all gone. The local pool at my town has two diving boards, for instance. One is about 6 or 7 feet above the water, the other is maybe 2 feet above.
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  #5  
Old 06-02-2007, 01:10 AM
LinusK LinusK is offline
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When I was coming up the local pool had a high dive that was (I'd estimate) approximately 500 ft above the water. It took about 45 minutes to climb the ladder, and the board itself was thin as a reed, and slippery, and trembled like a 12 year old girl in a hurricane.

Plus, if you hit the water wrong, it'd kill you.

I hope they haven't taken the high dives away.
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  #6  
Old 06-02-2007, 09:53 AM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
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Regulation competition diving boards are either 1 meter or 3 meters above the water surface.

Regulation fixed diving platforms are 5, 7.5, or 10 meters above the surface.

Our local rec centers still have boards, but I agree they're seem to be getting less common.
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  #7  
Old 06-02-2007, 10:48 AM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John DiFool
Did anyone ever personally know anyone who got hurt jumping off one-high or low or whatever?
Yes, a bunch of people although none with lasting consequences other than scars. It usually happens when boys try to do a trick outside of their ability level and end up smacking their head or upper body on the board resulting in body or head trauma. Even competitive divers have done this evn though their dives were higher but that doesn't matter for that type of injury.

Still, growing up, we had a place called Crystal Lake just over in East Texas. They had an amazing assortment of dangerous equipment but the best was the trolley tower. The trolley tower was an actual tower with wooden stairs with 3 levels. The lowest was about 30 feet high and the highest must have been about 60. You took the stairs to whatever level your bravery would allow and then you walked out on this big, wet, wooden platform. You grabbed a wet rope and pulled and pulled the trolley up so that you could ride it down over the lake. This was the biggest example of this type of idea I have ever seen in common useage. The problem was that the tower platforms we just over the muddy bank of the lake and people did fall and die or get maimed occasionally. However, if you weren't one of those. You got to take a screaming ride from the tower way out into the lake. You could also plunge off in the middle if you wanted even though it was frowned upon to drop high into the lake a good speed.

I shed a tear for kids today and their sad little padded world.
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  #8  
Old 06-02-2007, 11:11 AM
R. P. McMurphy R. P. McMurphy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LinusK
When I was coming up the local pool had a high dive that was (I'd estimate) approximately 500 ft above the water. It took about 45 minutes to climb the ladder, and the board itself was thin as a reed, and slippery, and trembled like a 12 year old girl in a hurricane.

Plus, if you hit the water wrong, it'd kill you.

I hope they haven't taken the high dives away.

You must have gone to high school in Acapulco?
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  #9  
Old 06-02-2007, 11:32 AM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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Originally Posted by Spartydog
You must have gone to high school in Acapulco?
No, I remember exactly the boards he's talking about. The higest paltform at the Aquatic's Center near my place was easily one bazillion feet high and it would take a really long time to climb the ladder, even with all the guys below going "Hurry up, chicken."

Strangely, as an adult , it looks a lot lower. But I swear, the thing must've been a mile high when I was eleven. They must have lowered it.

Last edited by Swallowed My Cellphone; 06-02-2007 at 11:33 AM..
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  #10  
Old 06-02-2007, 01:13 PM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
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When I was 10, I was the only kid on the planet that climbed all the way to the top of the high dive, walked out to the end, turned around and climbed all the way back down. I still have nightmares.
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  #11  
Old 06-02-2007, 02:04 PM
ouryL ouryL is offline
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Who wants to spend the money on liability insurance nowadays?
Our association not only removed the diving board, they erected signs saying "No Diving"
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  #12  
Old 06-02-2007, 02:34 PM
Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party is offline
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UK: The only swimming pools with them in that I know of are pretty old (built in the 70's). The pool in Wigan has a set of boards similar to what LinusK describes. There were three levels, the top one looked to be about a billion feet above the water.
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  #13  
Old 06-02-2007, 11:12 PM
Full Metal Lotus Full Metal Lotus is offline
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A billion feet?

That's not diving, its re-entry...

grin
FML
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  #14  
Old 06-02-2007, 11:21 PM
Sattua Sattua is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John DiFool
Did anyone ever personally know anyone who got hurt jumping off one-high or low or whatever?
I have a cousin who jumped off a diving board and hit the pavement instead of the water. His arm was so badly broken that nobody bothered to cross-question him about which edge of the board he'd jumped from.
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  #15  
Old 06-03-2007, 12:44 AM
Waenara Waenara is offline
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Most of the swimming pools in my city used to have 1m springboards, and a few had a 3m. I think most of them have been removed, not (AFAIK) for general liability reasons but because the deep ends of those pools weren't quite deep enough for today's safety standards which require a certain depth to have a diving board.

There's still a few city-run facilities with 1m diving boards, and even a couple with proper diving towers.


The pool that was one block away from the house I grew up in had a 1m springboard. I knew two people who were hurt on it. One slipped a little on the end and "skidded" off and smacked his head. The other one was when my instructor at a swimming lesson dove off the board and hit his head on the bottom of the pool, scraping the skin on his nose/forehead pretty bad.

They removed the board a few years later, and now there a 1m tall solid "platform" all along the deep end of the pool. You can stand on the platform and dive in. I guess it's not as dangerous as the old springboards.


On the other hand, my city's pools now have many cool features for kids that they didn't have when I was growing up. Quite a few have climbing ropes, and some have huge inflatable mattresses in the deep end that you get onto via swinging on from the climbing rope. A few pools have some "monkey bars"-type contraptions suspended over the pool. And a few have a "climbing wall" that's about five or six meters high that overhangs the deep end, so when you fall/jump off, you land in the water.

Last edited by Waenara; 06-03-2007 at 12:45 AM..
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  #16  
Old 06-03-2007, 01:02 AM
blondebear blondebear is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John DiFool
Did anyone ever personally know anyone who got hurt jumping off one-high or low or whatever?
I was never injured, but once I slipped when climbing up to the 3-meter board. I landed on top of the guy who was behind me on the ladder. Very embarrassing, of course, but there weren't any serious injuries, thank Og.
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  #17  
Old 06-03-2007, 01:43 AM
dangermom dangermom is online now
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They've been illegal in CA for a long time. They were common when I was a kid, but I haven't seen one for at least 10 years.
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  #18  
Old 06-03-2007, 02:59 AM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LinusK
When I was coming up the local pool had a high dive that was (I'd estimate) approximately 500 ft above the water. It took about 45 minutes to climb the ladder, and the board itself was thin as a reed, and slippery, and trembled like a 12 year old girl in a hurricane.
Coming up?
WhereTF did you [grow] up that had a board that high? Or are you describing it from a kids observation and memory?

The last time we visited my sister-in-law when she still lived in Kansas (summer 1999) we went to a public swimming pool that had a board that was marked 22 feet above the water, which I believe is more than double most regular boards. Being used to much lower boards I thought it was a hell of a drop. It was somewhere in the Olethe or Overland Park area, I don't recall exactly where.
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  #19  
Old 06-03-2007, 03:06 AM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Hell, when I was in high school, we used to move the lever, or knob, or whatever it was, that adjusted how "springy" the diving board was, and none of the pool staff ever said a word.

(Of course, I SUCK at diving, and I always have, so I usually just jumped off. Shut up).

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  #20  
Old 06-03-2007, 04:08 AM
flodnak flodnak is offline
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Here you can see a photo of the diving facilities at a relatively new indoor pool complex in Trondheim, Norway. (It opened in 2001.) It has diving boards or platforms at 1, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 meters. We've been promised a new pool with a similar platform here in Bęrum, to be completed sometime before pigs begin flying. For that matter, Frognerbadet in Oslo proper has a diving pool with high dive, and there are several diving structures that go up to at least 5 meters sticking out of the water on popular beaches in and around the city. I imagine you'll find even more of these in parts of Europe where the swimming season is a bit longer. Clearly you high-dive enthusiasts need to take a nice long vacation abroad
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  #21  
Old 06-03-2007, 02:10 PM
IAmNotSpartacus IAmNotSpartacus is offline
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Originally Posted by dangermom
They've been illegal in CA for a long time. They were common when I was a kid, but I haven't seen one for at least 10 years.
Calling shenanigans on this, lest you have a cite. "Illegal", eh?
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  #22  
Old 06-03-2007, 02:23 PM
Man With a Cat Man With a Cat is offline
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The pond in our town had a high dive that was exactly 463 feet above the water, and you had to swim out to the platform it was on, then climb a ladder with intentionally loosened rungs while the raft was rocking, then walk out on to the concave shaped board, and then the water was about 4 feet deep, so when you hit the water, you immediately felt the tendrils of the kid-eating plantlife that grew at the bottom.

And in 7th grade, to complete the swimming portion of PE, you had to dive off. Crystal, my next door neighbor, and incidentally the most perfect body THIS 12 year old had ever seen sunbathe in the yard next door, was the lifeguard, so there was no small measure of young testosterone raging through me when I bravely swam to the platform ahead of everyone else and made my dive.

Which ended up as some sort of bellyflop, nearly killing me, but I was NOT going to let that show to Crystal.

Years later, a couple kids broke their necks there, on that highdive, or more accurately, on the bottom. One died, the other is a quadriplegic. The pond is now a fishing hole, and swimming is prohibited.

No word on Crystal.

Last edited by Man With a Cat; 06-03-2007 at 02:25 PM..
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  #23  
Old 06-04-2007, 12:59 AM
Shayna Shayna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IAmNotSpartacus
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangermom
They've been illegal in CA for a long time. They were common when I was a kid, but I haven't seen one for at least 10 years.
Calling shenanigans on this, lest you have a cite. "Illegal", eh?
Shenanigans is right. Some schools are removing them, but some do indeed still have them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleRojelio

When I was 10, I was the only kid on the planet that climbed all the way to the top of the high dive, walked out to the end, turned around and climbed all the way back down. I still have nightmares.
That depends on what year you were 10. If it was 1974, then you weren't the only person on the planet to have done that, seeing as how I did exactly that, myself (though I think I was 13 at the time).

I took diving lessons one summer, but quit when I did a back flip too close to the board (the low one) and banged the back of my head on the underneath side of the board as I came around. Clearly I wasn't very good at it anyway, so no loss there.
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  #24  
Old 06-04-2007, 02:27 AM
dangermom dangermom is online now
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Sorry, I had understood that they were no longer allowed in public CA pools. I was thinking of 10 feet +. At any rate, I haven't seen one for a very long time.
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  #25  
Old 07-17-2011, 06:12 PM
redqueen redqueen is offline
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few diving boards left...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
When I was a kid (in the 1970s) every swimming pool - even public pools - had a "high dive" and a "low dive." I'm not sure how high the hive dives were, but I would estimate 10 feet. Had lots of fun diving off of them.

The high dives seem to have disappeared from the pools around here. Why?
We have 3 high dives and 3 low dives here at the public pool in Lava Hot Springs, ID. We also have one of the last 10 meter platforms, plus the 5 & 7.5. They all get a lot of use, but yes there are tons of problems.

with the diving boards, rarely, we have one person land on another. we have a lot of belly flops winding divers & causing a rescue to be needed. Mostly we have non-swimming kids having to be rescued. nearly every weekend.

The platforms are another story...yesterday alone we had 3 spinal injury rescues that ultimately required ambulance transport to the hospital. one woman lost consciousness. During the summer, we average 5-7 spinal injury rescues a week.

We haven't had a death, but a few years ago, a 16 year old belly flopped off the 10 meter, and it stopped his heart. he had to be defibrillated, and ultimately spent time in physical rehab learning to walk & talk again after needing CPR for over 4 minutes.

So, yes they are fun. they are great. they are also dangerous and in many places it has been deemed not worth the risk of injury, death or lawsuit.

Last edited by redqueen; 07-17-2011 at 06:13 PM..
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  #26  
Old 07-17-2011, 06:36 PM
redqueen redqueen is offline
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
Coming up?
WhereTF did you [grow] up that had a board that high? Or are you describing it from a kids observation and memory?

The last time we visited my sister-in-law when she still lived in Kansas (summer 1999) we went to a public swimming pool that had a board that was marked 22 feet above the water, which I believe is more than double most regular boards. Being used to much lower boards I thought it was a hell of a drop. It was somewhere in the Olethe or Overland Park area, I don't recall exactly where.
at 500 feet you would be falling at a speed of over 100 mph, and would not survive. the highly trained cliff divers don't exceed 170 feet.
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:46 PM
running coach running coach is online now
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at 500 feet you would be falling at a speed of over 100 mph, and would not survive. the highly trained cliff divers don't exceed 170 feet.
It's a joke, told from the perspective of someone afraid of heights.

The one where I grew up was 2000 ft and was made from a single strand of spaghetti.
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  #28  
Old 07-17-2011, 08:21 PM
beowulff beowulff is offline
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The new swim park in North Scottsdale has 'em.
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  #29  
Old 07-17-2011, 08:42 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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First I've heard of it.

We still have both kinds in Michigan.
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  #30  
Old 07-17-2011, 08:46 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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I had a teacher who claimed he went off a high board, raised his head (i.e., tilted it backward), hit the water face first and broke his nose.

I (successfully) jumped off a 10-meter platform into a lake once. Even though it was uneventful, I do not recommend jumping off a 10-meter platform because you're in the air long enough to realize that you're voluntarily falling almost 4 stories.

Last edited by kunilou; 07-17-2011 at 08:47 PM..
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  #31  
Old 07-18-2011, 06:44 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Swimming pools?.........pah!

Diving boards?...............tish!

Platforms?...............fipsy!

In my home town we had the welcoming chilly, tea coloured embrace of the the River Tees.

There were several bridges across that provided diving opportunities but this was the pinnacle.

One year, about 25 years ago the bridge was scaffolded for repair and it provided some unofficial diving platforms at varying heights. (about 100, 150 and 200 feet as I recall).

We climbed the scaffolding and dived in to the deep water channel under the right hand arch.
Either side of that 10 foot channel were rock ledges about 6 feet below the water so you had to be accurate.

I dived from pretty much level with the roadway and.............it.............took..............a................long..................time........ .........to...................hit..................the......................water.

Long enough to think through the pros and cons of what I was doing and decide that once would be enough.
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  #32  
Old 07-18-2011, 08:08 AM
boytyperanma boytyperanma is offline
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Spring boards come in the 3 foot and 6 foot variety then you move to platforms that are 30 feet some having a half platform set between 10 and 20 feet.

Your typical public pool is somewhere around 10 feet deep which was the old standard for the 6 foot springboards, after multiple lawsuits that standard changed. Rather then redoing the pools so they were deeper most towns just removed the 6 foot boards. I think the 3 foot boards have a minimum depth standard of 9 feet.

At this point most public places have just cut out the boards all together for liability reasons.

I managed to hit my head on a 3 foot board when I was 9 or 10. I was doing an inward didn't spring far enough and came back down on the board. It hurt, I remained conscious with a mild concision. No permanent damage. The pool staff missed it completely.

I think it's a shame to see the boards going but also understand it's not worth trying to keep them. Too many have moved to just using them as something to jump off rather then actually learning and using them for diving.

My local pool wouldn't allow anyone to use the diving boards unless they had passed a test or were a member of one of the diving classes. (The simple answer for many kids was to sign up for a class but never attend, working out to 5 bucks a year for unlimited diving board use.)

Last edited by boytyperanma; 07-18-2011 at 08:11 AM..
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:10 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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When I was growing up, the first time I ever swam in a pool was when I was about 9, it was for a diving class for one of my red cross certs. It was at letchworth State Park, they had a swimming pool, full on olympic size with marked lanes and all, I think it was a uniform 4 feet deep or whatever lap pools are, and a diving specific pool that was something like 20 feet deep, just a smallish square pool[basically enough for the diving safely bit] with a dive tower that had a 1 meter board a 3 meter board and a 10 meter board. i do know we had to accomplish dives at standing on the edge and the 1 meter board - skill at basically solid platform and springboard.

Well, I found a picture of the olympic lap pool at least.
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  #34  
Old 07-18-2011, 09:36 AM
ryan ryan is offline
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A little google-fu shows that they've taken down both the low and high diving boards from the public pool in the neighborhood where I grew up (Troy, NY). Looks like they replaced them with slides.
I can understand why. More than once I jumped or dived off the high board and touched bottom. I can see it being dangerous. I am casual friends with a guy who is wheelchair bound due to spinal damage resulting from slamming into the bottom of a pool after a dive.
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Old 07-18-2011, 09:51 AM
boytyperanma boytyperanma is offline
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More than once I jumped or dived off the high board and touched bottom.
Which comes down to you are doing it wrong. Consider if you're diving correctly off a 10 meter platform you shouldn't end up going more then 10 feet deep.

I googled the current standards

Quote:
Originally Posted by FINA
A 1-meter diving board should have an 11.5-foot pool depth.

A 3-meter diving board should have a 12.5-foot pool depth.

A 1-meter diving platform should have an 11-foot pool depth.

A 3-meter diving platform should have a 12-foot pool depth.

A 5-meter diving platform should have a 12.5-foot pool depth.

A 7.5-meter diving platform should have a 15-foot pool depth.

A 10-meter diving platform should have a 16.5-foot pool depth.
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  #36  
Old 07-18-2011, 10:01 AM
The Flying Dutchman The Flying Dutchman is offline
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There's 8mm family film showing my dad doing about 5 somersaults off a high platform at a busy southern Ontario public swimming pool in the 1950s.
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  #37  
Old 07-18-2011, 10:10 AM
clairobscur clairobscur is online now
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Like everybody else, as a kid, I could dive freely. At the local swimming pool, there was a sort of square, deep pool that was used for training both divers and...err...divers (I mean the kind that jumps and the kind that has air tanks and palms).

Anyway, it was open to all, and you could jump from up to ten meters (although I never dared jumping from the highest platform, only from the one below. No clue how high it was, but I remember it seemed like it was taking forever to get back to the surface). At some point when I was a teen, there has been an accident and they closed the highest platforms (You could still jump from maybe 5 meters). Nowadays, the whole thing is off-limit for the general public.

And at my current local pool, there's only one plank, maybe...50 cm above the water level...

Last edited by clairobscur; 07-18-2011 at 10:11 AM..
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  #38  
Old 07-18-2011, 10:11 AM
Hampshire Hampshire is offline
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I knew this one guy who was on the University of Wisconsin's dive team. He did the most amazing dive. The Triple Lindey... or something like that.
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  #39  
Old 07-18-2011, 10:29 AM
brocks brocks is offline
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Originally Posted by LinusK View Post
When I was coming up the local pool had a high dive that was (I'd estimate) approximately 500 ft above the water. It took about 45 minutes to climb the ladder, and the board itself was thin as a reed, and slippery, and trembled like a 12 year old girl in a hurricane.

Plus, if you hit the water wrong, it'd kill you.
Not surprising, since that's twice as high as the deck on the Golden Gate Bridge.
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  #40  
Old 07-18-2011, 10:33 AM
John DiFool John DiFool is offline
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Originally Posted by Novelty Bobble View Post
There were several bridges across that provided diving opportunities but this was the pinnacle.

One year, about 25 years ago the bridge was scaffolded for repair and it provided some unofficial diving platforms at varying heights. (about 100, 150 and 200 feet as I recall).

We climbed the scaffolding and dived in to the deep water channel under the right hand arch.
Either side of that 10 foot channel were rock ledges about 6 feet below the water so you had to be accurate.
Your pic shows a small bridge about 8 feet above a small creek.
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  #41  
Old 07-18-2011, 10:53 AM
C3 C3 is offline
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I just got home a few minutes ago from our local swimming pool, where my kids were jumping off the diving boards. They have a separate dive pool there and after swim team practice, all the kids get a few turns at jumping or diving. I'm not sure of the exact measurements, but there's one board that looks like it's about 1 meter and a "high dive" board that's probably about 4 meters.
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  #42  
Old 07-18-2011, 11:47 AM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Yes, a bunch of people although none with lasting consequences other than scars. It usually happens when boys try to do a trick outside of their ability level and end up smacking their head or upper body on the board resulting in body or head trauma. .
I have known 3 people each of whom permanently lost eyesight in one eye. 2 of them hit the diving board, 1 of them dove onto someone else in the water. (I was told that 1 of these 3 who hit the diving board actually had his eye pop out when his head slammed into the board). I knew another who was permanently paralyzed when he dove into shallow water .

I think if you do not hit the board, do not hit anyone in the water, and do not dive too high nor dive into shallow water, and if you can swim, then a diving board is not dangerous.

Last edited by Susanann; 07-18-2011 at 11:49 AM..
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  #43  
Old 07-18-2011, 12:21 PM
Doctor Who Doctor Who is offline
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Originally Posted by Guinastasia View Post
Hell, when I was in high school, we used to move the lever, or knob, or whatever it was, that adjusted how "springy" the diving board was, and none of the pool staff ever said a word.

(Of course, I SUCK at diving, and I always have, so I usually just jumped off. Shut up).

It's called a fulcrum. http://diving.about.com/od/divingglo...fulcrumDef.htm
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  #44  
Old 07-18-2011, 01:43 PM
fiddlesticks fiddlesticks is online now
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Location: Alamo City
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My old hometown pool had a high dive and two low dives until they completely remodeled the pool in the 90s.

Before
After

Poor kids have to make do with water slides nowadays.
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  #45  
Old 07-18-2011, 05:43 PM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John DiFool View Post
Your pic shows a small bridge about 8 feet above a small creek.
tap..tap.......is this thing on?

There is a running joke throughout this thread regarding the exaggeration of heights due to the faulty memory of youth.

However, the bridge is about 30-35 feet tall (note the lamp-post) and the river about 30 yards across. (here is another photo with a person for a bit of scale)
So from the top of the scaffolding was the equivalent of a 10 metre platform and the bit about the narrow deep channel is perfectly true. Plus it was April and the water temp. was about 10-12C.....and there were killer brown trout in there.
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  #46  
Old 07-18-2011, 11:11 PM
mack mack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John DiFool
Did anyone ever personally know anyone who got hurt jumping off one-high or low or whatever?
When I was in band camp (seriously) a kid launched himself up and out off the high dive (3 meter), knifed through the water and hit the shallow to deep transition slope and broke a tooth.
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  #47  
Old 07-18-2011, 11:36 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2000
Thanks, Doctor Who. I have a feeling that wouldn't fly nowadays.

I haven't been there in years, but from what I've gathered, they've expanded the pool, added more boards (just regular ones), and a water slide. There was never a high dive there that I knew of.

(And I wouldn't have used it if there was -- I'm terrified of heights)
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  #48  
Old 07-19-2011, 02:54 AM
Cugel Cugel is offline
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My local when I was a kid still has its 10 metre tower. I used to dive head first off it, I reckoned that was safer than bombing.
http://www.canberraolympicpool.com.au/fun-days
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  #49  
Old 07-19-2011, 10:06 AM
The Flying Dutchman The Flying Dutchman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cugel View Post
My local when I was a kid still has its 10 metre tower. I used to dive head first off it, I reckoned that was safer than bombing.
http://www.canberraolympicpool.com.au/fun-days
Yah, but you guys in Australia start out way lower than us.
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  #50  
Old 07-19-2011, 02:18 PM
brix11 brix11 is offline
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The humungous Crystal Pool at Knoebel's, a northeastern Pennsylvania amusement park, still has 1-m and 3-m diving boards. I was there this summer and got my son to go down one of the slides in exchange for my jumping (I never learned how to properly dive) off the high-dive. As I am not a big fan of heights, this was not an experience I cared to repeat.
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