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  #1  
Old 07-14-2007, 01:53 PM
Great Dave Great Dave is offline
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Boundary between Northern and Southern California

This might qualify as a GD, but I'll put it here.

So, where do you think northern Cali stops and southern Cali begins? I draw the line just south of San Luis Obispo, thru Bakersfield and toward Vegas. I suppose some in Arcata might put the line somewhere in Marin, though.

I seem to remember some suggestions for splitting it into two (or even three states for those in Arcata) back in the early 90's- is that still being kick around, or have the proponents given up? There was the the State of Jefferson, which was abandoned because of WWII.
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  #2  
Old 07-14-2007, 02:04 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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To me, SoCal stops at Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara to San Jose is Central (Coast) California. The Bay Area to Crescent City is Northern California. Sacramento is its own Hell.
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  #3  
Old 07-14-2007, 08:21 PM
Bearflag70 Bearflag70 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Sacramento is its own Hell.
Some people like Sac. Stockton, on the other hand is its own hell. So is Redding. Oh, and Fresno, Bakersfield, Riverside, San Bernardino, National City, Compton, Susanville...

To the OP, it generally depends on whether you split the state in 2 or 3. If split in 2, the border is generally the Tehachapi Mountains or the straight line on the map that forms the northern borders of San Luis Obispo, Kern, and San Bernardino Counties. If split in 3, then everthing from the Santa Monica Mountains / Point Mugu (Ventura County) up to Monterey / Santa Cruz is Central California, IHMO.

JOKE: California will never split because nobody can agree who gets stuck with Fresno.

Last edited by Bearflag70; 07-14-2007 at 08:22 PM..
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  #4  
Old 07-14-2007, 08:31 PM
capybara capybara is offline
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I think southern California ends depending on whom you talk to-- people in Santa Cruz or Monterrey would certainly hate being called So Cal, and down to San Luis Obispo. . . and a lot of people in Santa Maria. . . Santa Barbara. . . and in Ventura. . . probably Malibu. . . maybe Santa Monica. . . I think So Cal implies LA, and lots of people just barely north/west of there don't want to associated with that and would be happy being called central coast. So, yes, So Cal stops just north of San Diego.
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  #5  
Old 07-14-2007, 08:38 PM
Stranger On A Train Stranger On A Train is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearflag70
JOKE: California will never split because nobody can agree who gets stuck with Fresno.
Can't we just sell it to Nevada for more water rights?

Stranger
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  #6  
Old 07-14-2007, 11:33 PM
jayjay jayjay is offline
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Originally Posted by Stranger On A Train
Can't we just sell it to Nevada for more water rights?

Stranger
They don't want the raisins...
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  #7  
Old 07-15-2007, 12:08 AM
Hometownboy Hometownboy is offline
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A Bay-Area college friend had a map he'd made for the proposed division (circa 1968). Imagine the map of California. The border begins at 37 30 minutes north at the the Pacific (just below Monterey) and runs along that line to the Nevada border EXCEPT for two critical offsets.

1. just before it hits I-5, it turns and runs north to loop around Sacramento and Stockton (which puts them in South California). It turns southward between Stockton and Modesto, which puts Modesto in North California.

2. When it reaches 37 30' again, it tracks east to the Nevada border except for a one-mile wide strip that goes to Yosemite, encircles it, and returns north, putting Half-Dome and company into North California. Exact placement of the Yosemite Access Corridor was a matter still under discussion by my roommate and his twin brother.

Sounded good to this Oregonian...
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  #8  
Old 07-15-2007, 07:14 AM
BluePitbull BluePitbull is offline
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Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
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  #9  
Old 07-15-2007, 07:38 AM
zuma zuma is offline
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We both claim SLOtown.

That's the line, I think.
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  #10  
Old 07-15-2007, 08:52 AM
Zeldar Zeldar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
I'm an American and I will support this same question. Are there distinctly different geological differences, climate, vegetation, wildlife or other criteria of that type?

Using a state I'm more familiar with, Tennessee, there are three separate sections to the state based on mostly geological distinctions. East, Middle and West are fairly clearly defined by the mountainous East, the "rolling hills" Middle and the "flatlands" West. The Cumberland Plateau helps to define the East/Middle boundary and the Tennessee River helps to define the Middle/West boundary. These sections are significant enough that the state flag has three stars to symbolize those distinct areas.

And the major population centers correspond well with those regions: Memphis in the West, Nashville in the Middle, and Knoxville and Chattanooga in the East.
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Old 07-15-2007, 09:23 AM
BluePitbull BluePitbull is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar
I'm an American and I will support this same question. Are there distinctly different geological differences, climate, vegetation, wildlife or other criteria of that type?

Using a state I'm more familiar with, Tennessee, there are three separate sections to the state based on mostly geological distinctions. East, Middle and West are fairly clearly defined by the mountainous East, the "rolling hills" Middle and the "flatlands" West. The Cumberland Plateau helps to define the East/Middle boundary and the Tennessee River helps to define the Middle/West boundary. These sections are significant enough that the state flag has three stars to symbolize those distinct areas.

And the major population centers correspond well with those regions: Memphis in the West, Nashville in the Middle, and Knoxville and Chattanooga in the East.

What about cultural and demographic differences??
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  #12  
Old 07-15-2007, 09:31 AM
Zeldar Zeldar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
What about cultural and demographic differences??
Sure, if that fits. I suspect the Mexican/Latino influence would be greater in SoCal but that's just a guess. What cultural distinction does NoCal have?

And are there other categories and distinctions that could apply? Rainfall maybe? Snowfall? Santa Anna (sp?) winds? Mudslides? Maybe wine-growing potential? Maybe garden vegetable growing? Oranges? Pistachios? Raisins?
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  #13  
Old 07-15-2007, 10:15 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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ISTM there was a secession movement in the northernmost counties, with a prospective capital of North California in Redding, a few years back, in response to their perception of being constantly overlooked by the state government. The activists made a point of calling Sacramento and the Bay Area Southern California.
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  #14  
Old 07-15-2007, 11:01 AM
Rick Rick is offline
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The proposed State of Jefferson
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  #15  
Old 07-15-2007, 11:15 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
Ask any Californian and they'll say so. It's very much an "Us vs Them" attitude, with the sides changing depending on who/what you are talking about. Kinda like the Irish of tradition, we like fighting each other almost as much as we like fighting outsiders. Personally, I gets the bends if I get north of SLO.
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  #16  
Old 07-15-2007, 11:36 AM
Giraffe Giraffe is offline
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I think we should start the line just south of Monterey and Salinas and end it just south of Yosemite and Mammoth Lakes. Merced is Northern CA, Fresno is Southern. I would have drawn the line farther south, but keeping Fresno out of Northern CA trumps all other considerations.
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  #17  
Old 07-15-2007, 11:49 AM
Morgenstern Morgenstern is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
Southern California
http://www.skylightweb.com/losangeles/santamonica.html

Northern California
http://www.terragalleria.com/califor....northern.html
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  #18  
Old 07-15-2007, 12:20 PM
DiosaBellissima DiosaBellissima is offline
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Most people in Bakersfield consider us to be "Northern-Southern California" (if that makes sense).

We're about a one hour drive from LA (well, Glendale, Burbank), but three hours (that's good time) from San Fran. We're definitely Southern California.
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  #19  
Old 07-15-2007, 02:06 PM
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There was an episode of "California's Gold" (#608) that provided a few theories. One place they visited was on CA 99 just outside of Madera, where there is a redwood planted next to a palm in the median. Another claim was made by the citizens of North Fork.

I forget where I read it, but one enterprising researcher cut out the shape of California on some cardboard. He balanced it on a pencil tip, and decided it was that point that marked the state's center.
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  #20  
Old 07-15-2007, 02:23 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar
I'm an American and I will support this same question. Are there distinctly different geological differences, climate, vegetation, wildlife or other criteria of that type?
As my degree is in Littoral Ecology (Marine Biology), I can say there is an important cut-off at Pt Conception.
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  #21  
Old 07-15-2007, 02:41 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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One of the problems with dividing California is that it needs to be divided into more than two pieces. The Central Valley is neither north nor south, geographically or culturally.
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  #22  
Old 07-15-2007, 05:01 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth
As my degree is in Littoral Ecology (Marine Biology), I can say there is an important cut-off at Pt Conception.
Yep. Mirrored on the land side by the Tehachapi range, which marks the border for certain less vagile fauna. Hence the traditional Tehachapi split. Geographically it is the best candidate.

Myself, I've always had a tendency to use a vague line starting at Big Sur to split the state. As Giraffe noted this mercifully confines Fresno to SoCal .

Last edited by Tamerlane; 07-15-2007 at 05:02 PM..
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  #23  
Old 07-15-2007, 06:12 PM
garygnu garygnu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
California stretches 1,240 km north-to-south covering nearly ten degrees of latitude. Here's the state outline superimposed over France, for comparison. The coast simply gets cooler going north. Southern CA is swathed with desert while Northern CA is forested, with the very fertile Central Valley sort of in between. The Sierra Nevada mountain range runs nearly the length of the California-Nevada border. It's a very diverse state socially and ecologically.

As long as we get Yosemite I'm good.

I saw an Absolut ad on a San Francisco building (while going to the Dopefest there) that labeled the two regions "California" and "South California." It was entitled "In an Absolut World."
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  #24  
Old 07-15-2007, 06:34 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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The Grapevine.
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  #25  
Old 07-15-2007, 06:42 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garygnu
California stretches 1,240 km north-to-south covering nearly ten degrees of latitude. Here's the state outline superimposed over France, for comparison.
Cool. I live in Provence.
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  #26  
Old 07-15-2007, 07:52 PM
DiosaBellissima DiosaBellissima is offline
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Why wouldn't the logical boundary be. . . somewhere in the middle? Like, how any one can say the Grapevine just baffles me. I would say (looking at a map) somewhere around Fresno (even a little north of it).
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  #27  
Old 07-15-2007, 08:55 PM
Antonius Block Antonius Block is offline
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Assuming that we're just doing a "North / South" split, no "Central Coast" or "Central Valley":
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tamerlane
Myself, I've always had a tendency to use a vague line starting at Big Sur to split the state.
I, too, think of Big Sur as the furthest south point of "Northern California"; even the name (sur = "south") suggests that it's part of en entity that stretches northward from it.

One can also get down as far as Big Sur -- but no further -- from the SF Bay Area (and even from Fort Bragg on the Mendocino Coast or Nevada City in the Sierra foothills) using only local public transportation. This, to me, means that the cutoff line between North and South cannot be further north than Big Sur. [In addition, I've only ever heard anyone around Big Sur refer to its main thoroughfare as "Highway One", never "The One" as those SoCal people have a tendency to do...]

Here is a map of the counties of California. Note that for the southernmost two-thirds or so, both the coast and the California / Nevada border run approximately Northwest - Southeast. If one wanted a simple "single-line" boundary, I'd propose running it perpendicular to the CA / NV border, bisecting Mono Lake (located near the "N" of MONO County on that map). Running approximately due southwest, such a "single-line" NorCal / SoCal border would reach the Pacific Coast just south of Big Sur.

Alternatively, if one wishes to maintain existing county boundaries, I'd put Monterey, San Benito, Merced, Mariposa, and Mono counties in NorCal, with the counties to the southeast of them (San Luis Obispo, Kings, Fresno, Inyo, etc) in SoCal. I'm undecided on Madera County; it contains the geographic center of California, and my "single-line border" (in the preceding paragraph) nearly bisects it, so it could go either way. Perhaps the residents could vote on it, or one could take polls as to whether a plurality refers to the main road through Madera as "Highway 99" (Norcalese) or "The 99" (SoCalese).

[Both of the above methods keep Yosemite in Norcal while banishing Fresno to SoCal, as nature intended. Sacramento and Stockton both need to be in NorCal too, despite what Hometownboy's friend thought.]

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiosaBellissima
We're ... three hours (that's good time) from San Fran. We're definitely Southern California.
Hey, if you're going to call it "San Fran", it's just as well you're not trying for inclusion in Northern California!
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  #28  
Old 07-15-2007, 11:35 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonius Block
Alternatively, if one wishes to maintain existing county boundaries, I'd put Monterey, San Benito, Merced, Mariposa, and Mono counties in NorCal, with the counties to the southeast of them (San Luis Obispo, Kings, Fresno, Inyo, etc) inSoCal.
San Luis Obispo is the problem child. It really has a Northern Cal ambience. It is also just barely North of Pt Conception, so biologically speaking, it should be in the North.
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  #29  
Old 07-16-2007, 03:28 AM
Kyla Kyla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
Both of my parents are originally from Southern California (dad's from East LA, mom's from Pasadena), but they moved to Northern California before I was born, and I grew up there. But most of my extended family still lives in Southern California (one of my aunts lived in Santa Monica for years, now her family is in S. Pasadena, most of the rest migrated south to Orange County). So I've spent plenty of time in both, and there is definitely a difference. Southern California is practically a desert (and to the east, it IS a desert), warmer, politically more conservative, more densely populated, and more Latino. The idea of a California of sun, sand, and surf, is almost entirely Southern California. Northern California is cooler, especially along the coasts where it rarely gets very warm at all, farther to the left politically, has redwood forests, and is less densely populated. This is where the idea of the "hippie" California comes from.

Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego, Hollywood and the film industry are all in Southern California.
The Bay Area (including San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose) Silicon Valley and the computer industry, and the Wine Country, are all in Northern California.

I'd put the line just south of Monterey, personally.
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  #30  
Old 07-16-2007, 07:11 AM
Hippy Hollow Hippy Hollow is offline
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Former SLO resident here. SLO is neither NorCal or SoCal, it's the Central Coast. SLO residents hate being lumped in Southerners.

SB is probably the boundary for SoCal. Gaviota and Lompoc up the 101 to Santa Maria, Pismo, SLO, Morro Bay, up to probably Atascadero and/or San Simeon is Central. North of there, that's NorCal.

No idea how to deal with the interior of the state, though.
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  #31  
Old 07-16-2007, 07:33 AM
Sunrazor Sunrazor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger On A Train
Can't we just sell it to Nevada for more water rights?
Nevada doesn't have any water. Colorado has the water. And we don't want Fresno, either.
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  #32  
Old 07-16-2007, 12:58 PM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePitbull
Sorry for asking, I am a non American, Is there really a difference between Northern California and Southern California?
Northern Californians are smart, earthy, generous, and hip. Southern Californians are dumber than rocks. Unfortunately, thanks to Hollywood, much of the world equates "U.S. Citizen" with "Southern Californian".
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  #33  
Old 07-16-2007, 01:37 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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Northern California has water. Southern California needs water. Southern California has more people and more legislative clout. Therefore there is a huge aqueduct bringing water from NoCal to LA. Another aqueduct supplies part of the Central Valley. If I were splitting California, I'd do it by rainfall.

Rainfall Map

Geographic map - - to show the Valley and the mountains.

My parents were born in SoCal, but by the time they retired, the area was so built up that they moved to NoCal for some elbow room. Fly over the LA area and the only green areas you'll see are parks, golf courses, and cemetaries. I know that Greater LA isn't all of SoCal, but it's where most of the people are.
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  #34  
Old 07-16-2007, 02:34 PM
cher3 cher3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JKellyMap
Northern Californians are smart, earthy, generous, and hip. Southern Californians are dumber than rocks. Unfortunately, thanks to Hollywood, much of the world equates "U.S. Citizen" with "Southern Californian".
An introduction to some Southern California rocks:

http://www.ucsd.edu/

http://sio.ucsd.edu/

http://www.salk.edu/index.php

http://www.sdsu.edu/


Thanks to posts like the above-quoted, much of the world equates "Southern California" with "Hollywood."
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  #35  
Old 07-16-2007, 04:03 PM
dwc1970 dwc1970 is offline
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The same north/south dichotomy exists here in Idaho as well. Most Idahoans will concur that northern Idaho begins at the town of Riggins. Northern Idahoans often feel alienated and neglected by us in the southern part of the state. The climate there is cooler and wetter than in southern Idaho with more forests and mountains. The logging and mining industries are more prominent there, too. We have plenty of forests and mountains in southern Idaho, too, but this end of the state is more known for its high desert climate and agriculture. Northern Idaho is also still reeling from its stigma in being associated with KKK/skinheads/Neo Nazi's/Aryan Nations/White Supremacists or whatever they're called, even though the David Butler compound there was torn down years ago and the group was bankrupted. The capital and most of the larger cities in Idaho are in the southern half of the state, so there's more weight carried here, legislatively and politically speaking. Only one highway (U.S. 95) connects the two ends of the state.
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  #36  
Old 07-16-2007, 04:20 PM
garygnu garygnu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwc1970
The same north/south dichotomy exists here in Idaho as well...
In researching ideas for this thread I came across The State of Lincoln.
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  #37  
Old 07-16-2007, 05:21 PM
jsc1953 jsc1953 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JKellyMap
Northern Californians are smart, earthy, generous, and hip. Southern Californians are dumber than rocks. Unfortunately, thanks to Hollywood, much of the world equates "U.S. Citizen" with "Southern Californian".
Northern California: redwood trees, wine country, pot-growers, spotted owls, Mt Shasta, Tahoe (barely), rock-covered beaches and cold ocean water, hippies, rainy winters, Berkeley.

Southern California: movie & TV industry, deserts, dry winters, sandy beaches & warm water, The OC, Malibu, Nixon & Reagan, USC.

Yeah, there's a difference.
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  #38  
Old 07-16-2007, 05:28 PM
cher3 cher3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsc1953
Northern California: redwood trees, wine country, pot-growers, spotted owls, Mt Shasta, Tahoe (barely), rock-covered beaches and cold ocean water, hippies, rainy winters, Berkeley.

Southern California: movie & TV industry, deserts, dry winters, sandy beaches & warm water, The OC, Malibu, Nixon & Reagan, USC.

Yeah, there's a difference.
Gah!

Southern California does not equal L.A.

(And if you think the water is warm, you are in for a surprise.)
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  #39  
Old 07-16-2007, 06:12 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar
I'm an American and I will support this same question. Are there distinctly different geological differences, climate, vegetation, wildlife or other criteria of that type?

.
Culturally I think it's mainly the rivalry between San Francisco and Los Angeles. I won't go into it here; there must be a half dozen threads on that subject.

Geographically, I think if you are north of L.A. county but still in commuting distance, you live in SoCal.
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  #40  
Old 07-16-2007, 06:15 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsc1953
Northern California: redwood trees, wine country, pot-growers, spotted owls, Mt Shasta, Tahoe (barely), rock-covered beaches and cold ocean water, hippies, rainy winters, Berkeley.

Southern California: movie & TV industry, deserts, dry winters, sandy beaches & warm water, The OC, Malibu, Nixon & Reagan, USC.

Yeah, there's a difference.
Our ocean water is cold here too. You can't go in without a wetsuit for a good part of the year.

L.A. has been voting strongly Democratic in recent elections; the fact that Reagan and Nixon came from here really doesn't inform local culture or politics, IMO.
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  #41  
Old 07-16-2007, 06:15 PM
Queen Bruin Queen Bruin is offline
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Originally Posted by cher3


(And if you think the water is warm, you are in for a surprise.)
You weren't supposed to tell him that! You wait for them to go into the water, then take a picture of the results.
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  #42  
Old 07-16-2007, 06:28 PM
jsc1953 jsc1953 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cher3
Gah!

Southern California does not equal L.A.

(And if you think the water is warm, you are in for a surprise.)
Well, warmer. Based on this chart , it looks like August at Newport Beach the water is 70 degrees; August at Santa Cruz, 60 degrees.
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  #43  
Old 07-16-2007, 06:43 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JKellyMap
Northern Californians are smart, earthy, generous, and hip. Southern Californians are dumber than rocks. Unfortunately, thanks to Hollywood, much of the world equates "U.S. Citizen" with "Southern Californian".
To be fair, NYC also gets a great deal of exposure in movies and TV. I'm sure there are millions of people on the planet who, from watching American movies, believe that most Americans live in skyscrapers and take the subway to work, when that is actually an extremely atypical lifestyle for the country as a whole.

Last edited by Spectre of Pithecanthropus; 07-16-2007 at 06:43 PM..
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  #44  
Old 07-16-2007, 06:55 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JKellyMap
Northern Californians are smart, earthy, generous, and hip. Southern Californians are dumber than rocks. Unfortunately, thanks to Hollywood, much of the world equates "U.S. Citizen" with "Southern Californian".
Northern California: Behind the Granola Curtain. Hypocrites par excellence. "Free Speech" for everybody except those who question the Left. Still think it's 1967. Can't drive, can't think, socialist whiners or Silicon Valley geeks.

Southern California: Sets trends, doesn't follow them. Best Mexican food on the planet. Best weather in the country (Good job, San Diego!). If you can't find it in Greater Los Angeles, you don't need it. Better food, better art, better baseball teams....face it, SoCal does everything better than that part of the state that exists north of Bakersfield. Everything.
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  #45  
Old 07-16-2007, 07:10 PM
Yorikke Yorikke is offline
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I live near Visalia - between Bakersfield and Fresno. I consider much farther north from Fresno to be North. It's so ungodly, detestably hot in the Central Valley. Once you get to the part where it's not REGULARLY 105 Fahrenheit in the summer, it's NoCal. Christ, I miss San Francisco. Wearing a jacket in the summer is heaven!

Joe
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  #46  
Old 07-16-2007, 07:23 PM
Darryl Lict Darryl Lict is offline
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I reluctanly admit that Santa Barbara is in SoCal. The NoCal/SoCal border is between Nipomo and Santa Maria. I guess we should just make it the Santa Maria River. I defer to my buddies in SLOtown to allow then NoCal membership. Note that the fact that I use the term NoCal makes me a de facto SoCalifornian.

Realistically, Big Sur is a fine defining point for NoCal/SoCal. Do we get it? Just give us all of Los Padres National Forest. I love Yosemite, but I guess that that goes to NoCal, but we get Sequoia and King's Canyon.

However, when the state gets divided up I'm all for Santa Barbara being in Central California. We get Mammoth lakes, but not Fresno. Ventura is a cool town, but is increasingly a suburb of LA. As I always tell everyone, we are geographically isolated from LA. One could argue that the Conejo grade is would be the border of central California, thus allowing Ventura into Central California. But by that standard, we would have to accept Simi Valley, home of the Ronald Reagan Library whose website appears to have been designed in the 1980's. Yeah, I know Ronnie had a ranch in Santa Barbara and there is some huge Ronald Reagan museum in town, but I didn't vote for him.
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  #47  
Old 07-17-2007, 03:57 AM
Kyla Kyla is offline
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Join Date: Mar 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Northern California: Behind the Granola Curtain. Hypocrites par excellence. "Free Speech" for everybody except those who question the Left. Still think it's 1967. Can't drive, can't think, socialist whiners or Silicon Valley geeks.
About as accurate as you might expect from someone who admits he never goes north of San Luis Obispo.

Good description of Santa Cruz, though. God, that place is annoying.
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  #48  
Old 07-17-2007, 08:50 AM
Great Dave Great Dave is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Northern California: Behind the Granola Curtain. Hypocrites par excellence. "Free Speech" for everybody except those who question the Left. Still think it's 1967. Can't drive, can't think, socialist whiners or Silicon Valley geeks.

Southern California: Sets trends, doesn't follow them. Best Mexican food on the planet. Best weather in the country (Good job, San Diego!). If you can't find it in Greater Los Angeles, you don't need it. Better food, better art, better baseball teams....face it, SoCal does everything better than that part of the state that exists north of Bakersfield. Everything.
Especially humility!!

Pompous, self-absorbed, close-minded SoCal jerk!
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  #49  
Old 07-17-2007, 11:56 AM
Troy McClure SF Troy McClure SF is offline
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Join Date: Mar 1999
I'm willing to accept Monterey, but only if we get our goddamn water back as well.
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Troy McClure SF; Proud 99'er!
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  #50  
Old 07-17-2007, 12:18 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Stockton
Posts: 8,147
Quote:
Once you get to the part where it's not REGULARLY 105 Fahrenheit in the summer, it's NoCal
Sooooo. . . you're saying that Redding is SoCal?
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