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  #1  
Old 03-09-2008, 05:24 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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How old would the oldest person you knew well be if he or she were still alive?

Just curious due to the thread on WW1 vets which involves centenarians. I've always had a fascination about generational overlap and how many individuals separate us from various times in modern history.

So, how old would the oldest person you can say you knew well be? (I'll let you define knew well, though my definition would be something like "you knew them and they knew you on sight, you talked with each other and spent a significant amount of time together, and you have clear memories of them"). Give your own age as well if you don't mind.


I'm 41; the oldest people I knew extremely well were my twin great aunts who were born in October 1889, which means they would be 118 if they were still alive (119 in October).* The grandparents I knew well include my mother's father (a WW1 vet) who would be 115 and my paternal grandmother who would be 110.


* I also knew the twins' brother who was 8 years older, so he'd be 127 if he were still alive. I don't count him though as I only met him a few times, I doubt he knew me from Adam, and while I knew who he was he was just the feeble little old man with the huge red nose who sometimes visited his sisters.

The oldest people I am positive my aunts knew well when they were young would be their grandmother, who was born in 1835, thus I'm one person removed from knowing the "adults in the Civil War" generation.

Last edited by Sampiro; 03-09-2008 at 05:27 PM..
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  #2  
Old 03-09-2008, 05:34 PM
What Exit? What Exit? is offline
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My Brother-In-Law's God Mother lived to 102 and died in 98. So she would have been born in 1896. We used to have her over for holidays and visit her in the nursing home. She was a really nice old lady. She would be 112 today. My wife and I brought my baby daughter to visit her and it made her day. She was the queen of the dinning haul that afternoon. She retired from teaching before I was born. I always found it amazing that I knew someone that had been retired longer than I was alive.

My Great Aunt Anna was born in 1890, I barely remember her, mostly that she had a nice dog named Snoopy. So she would be going on 118.

I am your age.
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  #3  
Old 03-09-2008, 05:45 PM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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My paternal grandfather would be 109.
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Old 03-09-2008, 05:53 PM
Ephemera Ephemera is offline
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My paternal grandmother would be 96.

I'm 26.
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Old 03-09-2008, 05:54 PM
Can Handle the Truth Can Handle the Truth is offline
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I'm 44; my maternal grandmother would be 105.
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Old 03-09-2008, 06:02 PM
racer72 racer72 is offline
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My paternal grandmother is still alive and she is 104.
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  #7  
Old 03-09-2008, 06:14 PM
Litoris Litoris is offline
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Growing up, my "Grandma Wienke" was the oldest person I knew. I knew her very well -- I lived with her for two summers in a row right my 7th and 8th grade years. The last summer I spend with her I was 13, she was 96. She lived to be 99, but if she were still alive today, she would be 129. She was a hoot, she loved listening to the Sex Pistols with me, she insisted that we have a spot of brandy each nigth before bed and had the greatest sense of humour. When she was younger, the woman was a total wild child. She'd been to "plenty of" Speak Easies. She used to wear a red petticoat, "just to drive the boys wild," and once tried to join the KKK -- back before it was considered a racist institution. She taught me how to brew a "proper" cup of English tea, and believe me, she is the biggest reason for my anal retention where the English language is concerned. She and I were like two peas in a pod seperated by far too many years -- hell, I am even named after her in a weird way (her name was JoHanna -- Austrian pronunciation, soft "j" -- mine is Joanna -- American pronunciation, hard "j"). I miss her.
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Old 03-09-2008, 06:19 PM
Canadjun Canadjun is offline
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Just googled my paternal grandfather. Looks like he was born in 1885, so that would make him 123 this year.
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  #9  
Old 03-09-2008, 06:24 PM
dangermom dangermom is offline
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I had two great-grandmothers I spent time with as a little girl. They both lived in town and we had frequent visits. I'm not sure how old M.G. was (but now I live where she lived in the 50's and she graduated from college here at age ~70 in the late 60's!), so I'll have to skip her. My grandfather's mother was 101 when she died, and I was 6 then. I remember her birthday party; I was very impressed by her age. She would be 140 now. I have a quilt she made in the hall; I can see it from here.

When I was a young girl in the 80's there was an older man at my church whose father was a Civil War veteran; he was a young drummer boy or something, and had fathered this man in his old age.
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Old 03-09-2008, 06:25 PM
Litoris Litoris is offline
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Growing up, my "Grandma Wienke" was the oldest person I knew. I knew her very well -- I lived with her for two summers in a row right my 7th and 8th grade years. The last summer I spend with her I was 13, she was 96. She lived to be 99, but if she were still alive today, she would be 129. She was a hoot, she loved listening to the Sex Pistols with me, she insisted that we have a spot of brandy each nigth before bed and had the greatest sense of humour. When she was younger, the woman was a total wild child. She'd been to "plenty of" Speak Easies. She used to wear a red petticoat, "just to drive the boys wild," and once tried to join the KKK -- back before it was considered a racist institution. She taught me how to brew a "proper" cup of English tea, and believe me, she is the biggest reason for my anal retention where the English language is concerned. She and I were like two peas in a pod seperated by far too many years -- hell, I am even named after her in a weird way (her name was JoHanna -- Austrian pronunciation, soft "j" -- mine is Joanna -- American pronunciation, hard "j"). I miss her.
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  #11  
Old 03-09-2008, 06:38 PM
maggenpye maggenpye is offline
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My paternal Grandfather would be 107 if he were still alive. I'm 42.

My writing buddy is 93, she definitely fits the 'knows me well' part of the OP. She was two years old when WW1 ended and she grew up on the farm that was later subdivided into the housing estate that I grew up on. She remembers the road and houses being built where my father was to be born.

I have a living great uncle who is 90 and played soccer with my then 2 year old daughter before he moved back to Scotland. He was 83 at the time. He told me about his younger cousin who was a good cyclist, so good he went to the Olympics - in 1936.
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  #12  
Old 03-09-2008, 07:14 PM
jtgain jtgain is offline
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My great-grandfather died at age 91; would be 115 were he still alive..
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Old 03-09-2008, 07:30 PM
freckafree freckafree is offline
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My dad would be 102. I'm 49, the youngest of six, with 20 years between the oldest and me.
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  #14  
Old 03-09-2008, 07:40 PM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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My mother's mother's mother and father's mother's father would both be ~105 if they hadn't already passed on.
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Old 03-09-2008, 07:49 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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My great-aunt and great-uncle (my grandmother's siblings) both reached 100 when I was still a kid. That would have been nearly 50 years ago, so we're talking pre-Civil War.

My grandfather was born in 1882 and lived to age 102. He'd be 125 now.
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  #16  
Old 03-09-2008, 07:54 PM
Jammer Jammer is offline
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My great grandfather would be 123 this coming July. As a child I lived about 1/2 a mile from him and spent many days with him and his daughter (my great aunt). We were very close and I still keep a picture of him on my office desk. To this day, I always think of him when I see a Baby Ruth candy bar or Juicy Fruit chewing gum, as he always had plenty of both for his great grandchildren.

He died when I was 6 years old. I'm 43 as of last month.

Jammer
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  #17  
Old 03-09-2008, 07:58 PM
Cunctator Cunctator is offline
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As a child, I was close to my great-aunt May, my father's mother's sister. I was her "favourite" great-nephew. She was born in 1895. I still remember clearly the 80th birthday party we had for her in May 1975. She and all of her surviving friends (smoking like chimneys and drinking like fish) reminisced for hours about their schooldays, WWI, the Great Depression etc. It was just fascinating.

She died in 1988. If she were still alive she'd be 112.
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  #18  
Old 03-09-2008, 08:06 PM
as_u_wish as_u_wish is offline
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I was 10 in 1961. The oldest person I knew then was my Great Grandmother (everyone called her Ma.) who was 92. She "had all her faculties." I saw her every week or so until I left home at 17 and knew her as well as a child can, I suppose. She was born in 1870 (I did the math--it might have been 1869), so she'd be 138 now. This thread is making me feel historic. She used to talk to us about life before cars and before TV and growing up with no indoor plumbing or electricity and how excited they were when they got a pump in the kitchen and going to school in a one room school house and later teaching there before she got married at 19 and having ten children and two dying young. An amazing lady, really.

Last edited by as_u_wish; 03-09-2008 at 08:09 PM.. Reason: I forgot to say who the person was.
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  #19  
Old 03-09-2008, 08:26 PM
Baker Baker is offline
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I guess it would be my maternal grandfather, who was born in October 1900. He died in 1982. His wife, my grandmother, is still alive, and is 103.
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Old 03-09-2008, 08:33 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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My great-great granduncle George. He was born in 1876, the son of a Civil War vet. He died in 1974, and I knew him all my life, he died when I was 16.

He'd be 131 right now.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 03-09-2008 at 08:33 PM..
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  #21  
Old 03-09-2008, 08:52 PM
JimOfAllTrades JimOfAllTrades is offline
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My maternal grandfather died in 1976 shortly after his 88th (and my 20th) birthday. Hed be 120 if he was still alive.
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  #22  
Old 03-09-2008, 09:35 PM
VernWinterbottom VernWinterbottom is offline
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I'm turning 50 in a month or so. My great grandfather, born in 1874, died when I was six. He'd be 134 this year.

Because my parents were both oldest children, married at 20 and 21, and I was their firstborn a year later, I was fortunate enough to have three great grandmothers and a great grand father living when I was born. I have memories of all four. I was almost nine when the last of them died.
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  #23  
Old 03-09-2008, 10:38 PM
bouv bouv is offline
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She still is. My great aunt is almost 101. She was the second eldest of her and her siblings, and her older sister died before I was born. I never knew any of my great-grandparents.
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  #24  
Old 03-09-2008, 10:39 PM
Roderick Femm Roderick Femm is offline
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My great-grandmother was born in 1875 and, as a young girl, crossed from Minnesota to Oregon in a covered wagon (or so she said). So she would be 133 this year.

She died in her late '90's, so sometime after 1970. I was already an adult by then.


Roddy
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  #25  
Old 03-09-2008, 10:44 PM
Cisco Cisco is offline
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My paternal great-great grandfather was born in 1887 and died in 1991. I met him once when I was too young to remember and once when I was 9 or 10. He was quite a guy.
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  #26  
Old 03-10-2008, 12:00 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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I'm 25. My great-grandparents all died before I was born, as best I can tell. (One of my maternal GGMs died in 1982, but I don't know what month; if we suppose she died after I was born I guess she would be in her eleventeens or 120s.) So the answer is probably my still-living maternal grandparents. They're both 87.

ETA: I had a great-uncle on my father's side who I actually did meet a few times. He must have been older, but I don't know how old he was offhand. Supposedly he played for Boston or Baltimore in one of the pre-NBA basketball leagues.

EATA: Holy crap, it's true! He played for Boston in the 1930s, and died in 1998 at age 85. So Uncle Sam would be about 95 today.

Last edited by Marley23; 03-10-2008 at 12:04 AM..
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  #27  
Old 03-10-2008, 12:14 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Wow, am I glad I happened on this thread. I found a 20-year-old New York Times article about his team! Sam was the center. He must have been six feet tall at most, and an obit from the Miami Herald said he was a passer and not a scorer. I can shoot pretty well, but unfortunately I didn't inherit the height.

Quote:
Only Sam Kaplan, the center, went on to play professional ball on teams like Kate Smith's Celtics, sponsored by the popular radio singer, that were dominated by Jewish players from the urban centers.

[...]

Over near a pushcart-like stand from which real teen-agers dispensed egg creams, charlotte russes and penny candy, Sam Kaplan, the host, held forth on why this year's reunion was important.

Their stretch of Stone Avenue in the old neighborhood is now Mother Gaston Boulevard, the name changed to honor a black community worker and organizer, Mr. Kaplan said. Therefore, he was dedicating a dirt lane on his three-acre property south of Miami and naming it Stone Avenue. With the other old teammates looking on, he sank a street marker in the grass and dirt beneath tall pine trees and a lush live oak tree.
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  #28  
Old 03-10-2008, 12:27 AM
Hometownboy Hometownboy is offline
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Like Sampiro, I have been intrigued by generational overlap. My maternal grandfather was born, as he used to say, on 9/9/90, that being 1890. He lived to until March 1986, at age 95. He ran cattle on his place until he was 90. He would be 128 in September.

But it was his mother, my great-grandmother, that I also remember. I'll be 59 next month, and she was born in 1861 and lived to be 98, clear-minded until the end. It's amazing to me that I knew someone (though she's been gone for nearly 50 years now) who was born when Abraham Lincoln was still alive and the Civil War was raging. She would be 147 this year. I named my daughter Amanda after her.

And one more that boggles my mind, though it goes beyond the OP. Thanks to the 19th century development of photography, I have a photograph of my paternal great-great-great grandfather, who enjoyed the given name Hubbard. He was born in 1804. Though he died in the 1880s, before my grandfather was even born, it is fascinating to me to have a portrait of a relative born when Thomas Jefferson was president, Napoleon ruled France and Lewis and Clark set out on their journey.
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  #29  
Old 03-10-2008, 12:42 AM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Our family has a history of having children very late in life, which makes this an interesting exercise for me:

My paternal grandmother (who lived to 107 and who I knew well when I was a child) would be 127 today. (Born in 1881.)

Her father was a Confederate veteran, who had been wounded and disabled in the battle of Gaines Mill.
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  #30  
Old 03-10-2008, 01:02 AM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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My maternal grandfather (who was also my paternal step-grandfather) would have been 128.
My paternal grandmother (who was also my maternal step-grandmother would have been around the same age.
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  #31  
Old 03-10-2008, 01:19 AM
Sublight Sublight is offline
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My great-grandmother was born in 1895, so she would be 113 now. She passed away at 101, after living in her own house until she was 99.
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  #32  
Old 03-10-2008, 02:46 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
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One of my grandmothers was born in 1888--so she would be 120 this coming September. She taught school in a one-room schoolhouse when she was a teenager, and after that, eventually married the man who was to be my grandfather. It doesn't sound so unusual to us today, but my Dad was born when my grandmother was in her 40s. He was a healthy baby; she was a healthy Mom. Way to go, Granma!

She remembered reading in the daily papers about such things as the Titanic sinking and the growth of the telephone (at one point, her brother lived next door and he had a telephone, so obviously she had no need of one in her house). Of course, she was an expert on WWI (her brother-in-law--my great uncle--was in the thick of it), and WWII--her relatives and mine are commemorated in war cemeteries in Canada and Europe. She enjoyed radio programs, but television wasn't very popular with her. Yes, it was nice to see the stars she had heard for years on the radio (like Bob Hope, for example), but television wasn't as much fun as the picture that radio created in her mind.

My own memories of her are precious. She loved to bake cookies for her grandson, and I loved eating them. As I got older, she shared more "confidences" with me, most involving my Dad when he was a kid. Granma and I laughed a lot as she would tell me these stories; my Dad laughed too, but not always happily. Never mind, he was, I think, secretly pleased that I was learning family lore from the expert.

I still have the photo of my Granma's last Christmas. She must have been about 92 at the time. She was constantly in a home at the time and we had given her a shawl that she could use to keep warm as she went about her activities in the home. The photo shows her proudly wearing her shawl, with a devilish little grin on her face. What were you planning, Granma--I can only guess, but I'm sure it was fun. That was about December and she would pass away the following October. But that's the Granma I remember best.

Last edited by Spoons; 03-10-2008 at 02:47 AM..
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  #33  
Old 03-10-2008, 02:55 AM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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I'm 41. My great grandmother was alive when I was a little kid, her father had been in the confederate army and she was born some time after the war. She would be somewhere around 130ish if she were alive.

My dad was born in 1929, when he was a kid there were still some civil war veterans in veteran's day parades and the father of the family on the farm next door had been born a slave.
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  #34  
Old 03-10-2008, 09:28 AM
John Carter of Mars John Carter of Mars is offline
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My main caretaker until she died when I was eight years old was my great-great grandmother. There are any number of pictures around showing five generations of us.

She died in 1950 at age 98, which would make her be 156 this year and also makes me 65 . "Granny" hid on a sailboat departing from Germany when she was 16 years old and traveled to the US alone to seek her fame and fortune. Or so the story was told.
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  #35  
Old 03-10-2008, 09:46 AM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spoke-
Our family has a history of having children very late in life, which makes this an interesting exercise for me:

My paternal grandmother (who lived to 107 and who I knew well when I was a child) would be 127 today. (Born in 1881.)

Her father was a Confederate veteran, who had been wounded and disabled in the battle of Gaines Mill.
I should add that his father was a veteran of the War of 1812. So I am only four generations away from the War of 1812.

Our family is still a little pissed at the British.

Last edited by Spoke; 03-10-2008 at 09:49 AM..
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  #36  
Old 03-10-2008, 11:15 AM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Carter of Mars
My main caretaker until she died when I was eight years old was my great-great grandmother. There are any number of pictures around showing five generations of us.

She died in 1950 at age 98, which would make her be 156 this year and also makes me 65 . "Granny" hid on a sailboat departing from Germany when she was 16 years old and traveled to the US alone to seek her fame and fortune. Or so the story was told.
Wow -- these stories are so wonderful! Mine is less dramatic. I remember my great-aunt, who was born in 1900, so 108 I all I can muster. My grandmother, her sister, was 16 years younger ... and the two of them had older sisters who were grown and had families of their own when my grandmother was a girl. I never met any of them, but I used to like to think of them ... my relatives, who my grandmother knew, born in the 1800s! A marvel to my young mind.

I feel like I know, through geneological research, my husband's great-grandfather, who served in the Confederate Army. He was the first of five generations with the same first name (which is very unusual, so I won't list it here!). The fifth one is my son. So if I'm of a historical mind, I think of that Confederate soldier when I look at my little 3-year-old son.
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  #37  
Old 03-10-2008, 11:48 AM
beanpod beanpod is offline
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My great grandmother was born in 1910, so she would have been 98 this year. She died at 85. I was 13. (My family breeds quickly.)

People called her "granny" to irritate her, until they taught me how to say it, and from then on, of course, granny she happily was. She buried two husbands, one to TB when she had a toddler, the other to stomach cancer with a house full of half grown kids. My mom says she remembers when granny would get up at 4am, kill two chickens and fry them and bake bread from scratch, all for breakfast (a family of 10 farmers). The mind boggles. I just about manage to cook dinner 4 nights a week.

I remember her helping us play ball in her living room, and I remember how she cooked. Not the taste, but the way she used her ancient butcher knife for everything and gestured with it in her hands, flinging pieces of cabbage around the kitchen. Never saw her cut herself, even though she was legally blind for her last 15 years. We bought her a Salad Shooter once, but it sat on the shelf and collected dust. (Scared the crap out of all of us. She was on blood thinner!) By god, her homemade coleslaw was gonna be homemade.

Now when I'm cooking and talking, I catch myself gesturing with the knife...

Last edited by beanpod; 03-10-2008 at 11:49 AM..
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  #38  
Old 03-10-2008, 12:16 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Mine are similar to yours, Sampiro - I'm 28, my grandmother was 91 when she died during (but not related to) that very exciting flood Albany, GA had in 1994, so she'd be 101 now. Her husband was born in the 19th century. She certainly had known plenty of people who held the Civil War in living memory. My dad is 76 and he and his older sisters remember quite well when the lights went on in Georgia.

ETA - when we watch shows like Deadwood we're always amazed just to think about it - you know, Richardson's dad probably remembered the Revolution. Those people who went to the Gone with the Wind premiere wore their grandmothers' hoopskirts. The pyramids were as ancient to Cleopatra as she is to us.

Last edited by Zsofia; 03-10-2008 at 12:18 PM..
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  #39  
Old 03-10-2008, 12:47 PM
Student Driver Student Driver is offline
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I have never really had contact with anyone in my family-- I believe one grandmother lived to be nearly 100, and I was alive when others who were similarly old were about... but I have no proof of having met them. So...

My mom used to take me to visit a woman named Elsie when I was a kid. Started out with Elsie living alone in her own home, ended with her living alone in a nursing home, with a cardboard fold-together "dresser" in the corner of her room, holding the few possessions she still had left.

And, at the time, I was a little kid and just would hug Elsie and sit there while my mom talked to her, wonder about her scratchy face, and not really think about the situation. I still don't know exactly who she was in relation to my mom-- an old family friend, a godmother, someone from church.

This thread made me wonder a little about her, though I've actually thought of her a bit over the years... I just did a little searching. I knew how to say her last name, but not how to spell it. A couple of educated guesses later, and I think I turned up a record. Born April 17, 1898, died April 11, 1992. The bits of detail with her record look right. I think it's her, and I sit her a little sad: I knew someone born in the 19th century, and I was just too dumb at the time to know, care, or ask questions. Damn. She'd be about to turn 120. Still, in retrospect, I guess that's not terribly old; I'd thought she'd died much earlier... she was around when I was living on my own. God... I should have visited.

I think I'm going to call my mom tomorrow, and ask her just who Elsie was. Ought to be an interesting conversation.

Last edited by Student Driver; 03-10-2008 at 12:49 PM..
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  #40  
Old 03-10-2008, 01:12 PM
Otto Otto is offline
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My great-grandmother on my mother's side died at age 100 in 1976, making her born in 1876, meaning she would be 132 today. Supposedly she was born on a boat on the way over from Ireland.
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  #41  
Old 03-10-2008, 01:27 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
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Paging KlondikeGeoff and David Simmons!
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  #42  
Old 03-10-2008, 01:46 PM
Caricci Caricci is offline
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My great-grandmother, the evil Grandma Minnie, would have been 118 this year. She was born in Sicely to a Protestant family in 1990, the oldest of 10 children. Their Protestantism is what forced them to emigrate and she moved to Brooklyn at the age of 7. She worked in the garment district and witnessed the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire.

Ugh! Writing this and not posting a lot of it is making me have good thoughts about that mean old witch.
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  #43  
Old 03-10-2008, 05:53 PM
Creaky Creaky is offline
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My great Aunt Lulu Montague was born in 1889. I knew her when I was a kid. She died in 1972. She had really big hands for such a small woman. It was weird.

So she'd be 119 if she were alive.
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  #44  
Old 03-10-2008, 05:59 PM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
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My great aunt Mary Jane, my surrogate grandmother because my biological one lived in Florida, would have been 110 this November. She made it to 92 in any event, although her last years weren't too pleasant after her baby brother basically talked her out of her home and into second-rate nursing care in order to get her family heirlooms. Mary, I hope you're giving Jack hell wherever the two of you are now.
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  #45  
Old 03-10-2008, 09:05 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creaky
My great Aunt Lulu Montague was born in 1889. I knew her when I was a kid. She died in 1972. She had really big hands for such a small woman. It was weird.
With that name and the hands as you describe them, are you sure she wasn't the world's oldest drag queen? (Lulu Montague totally sounds like a Judy Holliday or Jayne Mansfield character.)
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  #46  
Old 03-10-2008, 09:59 PM
Creaky Creaky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sampiro
With that name and the hands as you describe them, are you sure she wasn't the world's oldest drag queen? (Lulu Montague totally sounds like a Judy Holliday or Jayne Mansfield character.)
I know, that is a cool name, but while she was a nice lady, she wasn't as interesting as a drag queen! Her Christian name was Louise, but I only ever knew her as Aunt Lulu. Those man hands were severely arresting, for sure.

I mean, when you're a little kid and you're short, you tend to see hands more than the adults do. If I can, I'll get her childhood pic out of the frame and scan it and post it and you can see what I mean. Seriously big hands, even as a kid.
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  #47  
Old 03-10-2008, 10:10 PM
MissTake MissTake is offline
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Whenever I catch a whiff of Ivory soap, or hear the tick of a space heater I think of my Great Grandma Josephine (maternal G'ma). She was born in 1885, died in 1980. We would go out to the farm every weekend to see her and my "Spinster Auntie". The farmhouse and a few acres were all that was left of what is now land full of very pricey homes. Walk in from the back porch into the kitchen with it's wash basin (with a bar of Ivory soap in a tin cup next to it) to your right. Wood floors with rag rugs she and her sisters' in law made. Go into the sitting room with one settee that only adult guests were allowed to sit on. I always sat on the floor beside Great G'ma. Towards the end she pretty much spoke only Czech, so she, my Great Aunt, and my Grandpa would chat.

Next door to my house was a wonderful woman named Helen. She was retired when I was little, and her elderly mom lived with her. In her kitchen was a rhinestone Krazy Kat clock which I got a kick out of. Her Mom, who I called Babka, would sit in her metal lawn chair (freshly painted every spring) and talk in broken, halting English. I would bring her lilacs or lemonade and get a "Dobro, Katja, veddy pretty". She passed on when I was 12 (38 now)... If Helen was 65 when I was 5, and she was the youngest of 7, I can't begin to guess how old Babka was.

I was always around the family elders, at least those on my Mom's side. The last one left is my mom's uncle, Ty, who was born in 1912. My mom's mom was a twin. Rose and Annie were inseparable, including living two doord down from each other until the day Aunti Annie died. Ty still lives in the house he and Annie bought when they married in 1931.

Last edited by MissTake; 03-10-2008 at 10:12 PM.. Reason: family ties confuzzled
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  #48  
Old 03-10-2008, 10:31 PM
elelle elelle is offline
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Join Date: Oct 1999
Who, hoo, LuLu! My great-grandmother was a Lulu, too. And I remember her very well, being the first great-grandchild. She was quite Victorian age, with doilies on the furniture. She was born in 1883, and travelled to California by wagon. Wooed by a Euro-Cherokee from Missouri,( and we have the swooning love letters that made us decendants happen, quite lovely), who became the Asst Postmaster for LA.

I remember her as a supreme matriarch, in a staunch environment of that...married non bloods didn't sit at the table with blood relatives, yikes, that was propriety then. She would dutifully send birthday cards with an immaculately crisp 5 dollar bill. We used to joke that she minted them in her basement. Very proper, yet loving. I;m glad I had her in my life, gives great perspective.
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  #49  
Old 03-10-2008, 11:30 PM
drm drm is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2001
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My great great aunt was born in 1890 and died when I was 9 (she was 96). I guess she'd be 118 this year. She lived right next door to me with my grandmother. She chewed each bite of food 20 times. When I'd eat dinner with her, I'd be there forEVER.

Incidentally, I have another great great aunt (different branch of the family, the two aren't related) who's over a hundred (104 give or take). She lives in a nice old plantation in Louisiana. She's a racist old bat and I don't like her very much. She doesn't like me very much either though so it's all good (I mentioned I was an atheist at one point...didn't go over all that well).
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  #50  
Old 03-11-2008, 12:08 AM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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There was a man who lived across the street from us when I was a kid. Though I was only 14 when he died at age 94, I had known him my entire life and spoke to him nearly every day. He died in '74, so that would make him 128 today.

His wife actually lived 15 years after his death, reaching 105. That woman was the skinniest human being I've ever seen in my life! About 5'4 if she weighed more than 60 pounds she weighed a ton.
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