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Old 03-13-2008, 07:49 PM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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Birch Syrup vs Maple Syrup

Now is the time of year that farmrs here in the NE tap sugar maple tress. it is fairly laborious-it takes about 30 gallons of sap to make a gallon of syrup. what about birch tres? they have a sap that contains sugar-does anyonemake birch syrup? I know beer was made from birch sap in colonial times-is birch beer still made?
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:54 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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I bought a small bottle of birch syrup years ago when I was in Alaska.

I still have most of it.

It is sweet, but it has an undoubted 'tree-like' flavor to it that I don't find appealing. It tastes a little like birch beer (and that's easy enough to find in a lot of grocery stores near me) but with woody overtones.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 03-13-2008 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:56 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Birch syrup is less common than maple syrup becuase it requires 100 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of syrup. But it is available from producers in Alaska, among others.
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:57 PM
astro astro is offline
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Old 03-13-2008, 09:57 PM
Askance Askance is offline
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I tried birch and spruce syrups while in Alaska in 2000. There's a reason why maple is the popular one; the others are simply unpalatable.
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Old 03-14-2008, 02:57 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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If you're condensing it by applying heat to drive off the water, it's more prone to burning than maple sap, because of the different sugars (IIRC Maple is sucrose, birch is fructose)
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Old 03-14-2008, 05:31 AM
Tuckerfan Tuckerfan is offline
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What other tree saps are edible?
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Old 03-14-2008, 05:54 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Palm sap is one that springs to mind (various different species) - harvesting it usually involves cutting down the tree and draining the trunk, I think.

Last edited by Mangetout; 03-14-2008 at 05:55 AM.
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Old 03-14-2008, 05:55 AM
Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party is offline
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In the UK and Northern Europe, there's sycamore, but that's a kind of maple, so perhaps it isn't surprising.
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Old 03-14-2008, 06:49 AM
slaphead slaphead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Askance
spruce ... unpalatable.
I'm astonished, I tell you. Astonished!
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Old 03-14-2008, 07:12 AM
crowmanyclouds crowmanyclouds is offline
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Walnut and Hickory.

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Old 03-14-2008, 07:57 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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The Larch.












(OK, not really).
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:53 AM
brazil84 brazil84 is offline
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I hear that poppy sap is pretty popular.

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Old 03-14-2008, 09:03 AM
Sal Ammoniac Sal Ammoniac is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Mulligan
In the UK and Northern Europe, there's sycamore, but that's a kind of maple, so perhaps it isn't surprising.
Yours is, ours isn't. Our sycamore is what you guys usually call a plane tree. Don't know if you can get syrup out of our sycamore, but I wouldn't think so.
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:24 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sal Ammoniac
Yours is, ours isn't. Our sycamore is what you guys usually call a plane tree.
That's interesting - I never knew that.

Quote:
Don't know if you can get syrup out of our sycamore, but I wouldn't think so.
I'm sure you can - the only question is whether it will be edible/toxic/unpalatable.
Nearly any deciduous, broad-leafed tree that has clear sap could probably yield syrup - as they'll pretty much all be pumping sugar-water up to their developing buds, but some of them might not be good or safe to eat (which I expect is what you really meant anyway).

Last edited by Mangetout; 03-14-2008 at 09:25 AM.
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