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Old 04-30-2008, 06:50 AM
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Whatcha readin' May (08) edition


Hi gang. Here is the May thread. (Link to April's)

Finished Those Who Walk In Darkness by John Ridley.

An X-Men rip-off with a heavy-handed message about prejudice. Our protagonist is a cop who hunts mutants - a black female cop who hunts mutants. The irony it burns!

The story was predictable, with few or no surprises. The big "twist" at the end was:

SPOILER:
The big love of her life turns out to be a mutant.
He left it open for a sequel, but even if he writes one I won't be bothered to read it.

Next up, one of the following:
Mr. Twilight
Destiny (Rogue Angel)
Magic Bites
Dog Days

They should arrive today and I will decide then which to read.
  #2  
Old 04-30-2008, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle
Started Test, by William Sleator. He's one of my favorite YA authors, but very uneven, and though I've looked forward to this book I don't really expect great things.
Finished last night. And oh. So not good. He's written other books that required or provoked thought, but this was written at the level of the story problems in my son's fifth grade math book. I still love ya, Bill, but have a little faith in the kids you're writing for, please.

Started What I Was, by Meg Rosoff. In looking over the reviews, I notice this was issued as a YA book in Britain, but released here as an adult book. Hmmm. I'm not sure yet, but I think there's some male homosexuality in it. I wonder if that's the reason, or is it that Americans are more stoopider, or what?
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Old 04-30-2008, 07:56 AM
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Just started the third book in Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen's Civil War alternate history series, Never Call Retreat . The first two were excellent so I have high hopes.
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Old 04-30-2008, 10:26 AM
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I'm currently reading The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell on my Amazon Kindle e-reader (love it!).

It is slow going, as I still have another month to go in my first year of an MBA program. Most of my reading of late have consisited of Harvard Business School case studies and The Goal by Eli Goldratt (brilliant as a teaching tool, crap as a workplace novel!)

From June to August, I have a little summer break, so I will be picking up the following:

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini.
Freakonomics by Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt.
Then We Came to an End by Joshua Ferris.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding. (I have never read this!)
Legacy of Ashes by Tim Weiner
Hollywood Station by Joseph Wambaugh
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Audition by Barbara Walters (her new autobiography)

I'm going for a book a week. Even without classes, this will still be a challenge given my hectic schedule (work, wife, kids, reading the NYT every day, porn addiction...).
  #5  
Old 04-30-2008, 12:15 PM
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I finally broke down and ordered Descartes' Error, since Larry Borgia is about the third person in the past month who's suggested it, and I'm easy that way.
Still haven't finished the M. de Sade's Letters from Prison, but am enjoying it tremendously. Last night, I started David Sedaris' Naked, which is hilarious.
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Old 04-30-2008, 01:05 PM
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Just finished reading Gone With the Wind. You'd think more people would know about this one.

My wife suggested The Cult of the Amateur: How Blogs, Wiki, Social Networking and the Digital World are Assaulting our Economy, our Culture, and our Values. Reads so far like the screed it is. To give you an idea as to whether or not this guy is serious, the link takes you to his blog. But honestly, he is serious and while he makes some decent points (it's hard to type 200+ pages and not make at least one good point), he comes across like a monk ranting about the printing press allowing losers like Luther to mock the church.

When I'm done with that, I'm going to read William Bernsteins A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World.
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Old 04-30-2008, 10:23 PM
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Chiming in so I can be subscribed to the thread. As I mentioned in the April thread, I finished Tony Hillerman's The Shape Shifter yesterday (Wednesday) and will start James Ellroy's Destination: Morgue! tomorrow.
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Old 05-01-2008, 05:50 AM
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Just started "The Son of Witch" after finishing "The Princes Bride". Next in line is "The Year of Living Biblically".
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Old 05-01-2008, 05:59 AM
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Gormeghast arrived a couple days ago and i am thriugh titus groas and partway into book 2. i thought the bbc miniseries i got from netflix was interesting enough to check out the book. also reading bujolds memory, moons change of command and a russian hagiography.
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Old 05-01-2008, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khadaji
Next up, one of the following:
Mr. Twilight
Destiny (Rogue Angel)
Magic Bites
Dog Days

They should arrive today and I will decide then which to read.

Truth in reading, I never actually read the first book in the Rogue Angel series. I picked it up on book two. So I can't say how that one is. Have you read any of the Cassandra Palmer books? They're not bad, and the third one seems to wrap most of the plot points up, so it has a good stopping point.
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Old 05-01-2008, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Future Londonite
Next in line is "The Year of Living Biblically".
Liked it a lot -- he talks about some of the actual spiritual impact of the experience of what was originally kind of a smart-ass project.

Currently reading an excellent novel, The Commoner by John Burnham Schwartz. It's a fictionalized first-person account of woman who became the first commoner to marry into the Japanese imperial family. Wonderfully written and a fascinating story.
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Old 05-01-2008, 01:50 PM
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I'm plodding along through The Heptameron. It's not as much fun as The Decameron, but there's a lot more sex.

Really enjoying American Gods and The Stone of Farewell. I love me some travelin' fantasy.

Unfortunately Chronicles of Pern: First Fall has just made me realize a huge plot hole in the Pern series (*waits for the chorus of "just one?" to die down*). Even though Avril Bitra doesn't show up in this book, the second story, "The Ford of Red Hanrahan" makes me wonder just why in the heck someone named a hold after one of the greatest traitors in Pernese history. What bugs me even more is that McCaffrey herself brought this up in one of the later books (All the Weyrs of Pern, if I recall) and never answered it! Avril never had children, so it's not a family name. Argh. This is why I don't like being adult sometimes; it's harder to overlook plot holes in beloved long-running series.
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Old 05-01-2008, 03:31 PM
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I'm currently reading Iain M. Banks' latest Culture novel, Matter. It is very entertaining so far.

I'd like to plug the website www.goodreads.com - we have an SDMB group! I really like the site because it lets me lists "to reads" and helps me keep track of what I have read already, which helps when I get a recommendation that sounds vaguely familiar. Also I love to read short story collections and have been known to pick up the same collection more than once.
  #14  
Old 05-01-2008, 05:20 PM
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War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History: 1500 to Today by Max Boot. I liked the early chapters but I found myself diagreeing with him more and more in the later chapters.

The Unfolding of Language: An Evolutionary Tour of Mankind's Greatest Invention by Guy Deutscher. I'm a couple of hundred pages into it and it's interesting. I'll admit I don't know enough about the subject to judge if he really knows what he's talking about.
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Old 05-01-2008, 05:26 PM
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My boyfriend recently bought me Tweak by Nic Sheff. I like drug books and it was featured at Barnes and Noble so he picked it up for me. I've only read the first few pages (boo finals) but will probably read a big chunk of it tonight while I'm stuck at work.
  #16  
Old 05-01-2008, 05:47 PM
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Just finished Jane Eyre -- always nice to read a classic that's actually a good book -- and Spook by Mary Roach, which is about science's perspectives on an afterlife. I really, really like her writing style -- conversational and funny -- and wanted to read more from her. I had a choice between Stiff, which is about dead bodies, and Bonk, which is about sex research.

She'll be at the Tattered Cover (Colfax location) here in Denver tomorrow evening to read and sign Bonk, FWIW.

(That's the one I chose to read.)
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Old 05-01-2008, 05:59 PM
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Today I finished Goodbye, Jimmy Choos by Annie Sanders. It's a Brit book, and I enjoyed it tremendously. I totally admit I picked it up because of my shoe fetish. But it's about 2 London women who are moved to the country by their husbands for whatever reason, stumble in to a friendship with each other - and just have one heck of a year.

My book club book for this month is The Pact by Jody Picoult. They always pick such depressing book - I think this one is about their teenager committing suicide. Last month it was about a funeral, the month before it was about a columbine-type killer.

[Note to self: stop letting them pick such sad stuff.]
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Old 05-01-2008, 06:37 PM
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I've got about twenty pages to go on Robert Silverburg's A Time of Changes which I found to have some interesting parts but on the whole too dated to really resonate with me. And since the themes don't work for me I'm left looking at the culture he built for the metaphor and I'm finding it severely lacking.

Next up on my list are Samuel R. Delany's The Motion of Light in Water followed by Pohl's Man Plus. I've had mixed responses to Delany's other work but I've mainly read the stuff he wrote when he was in his early twenties. I'm hoping that a few more decades of experience have given him a more polished style...
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Old 05-01-2008, 09:23 PM
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I am finishing up The Brothers Karamazov in a leisurely way. I find Dostoevsky very accessible (language is quite modern, actually). It's just a matter of finding the time to finish a 1000+ page book.

Got to say-for years and years the Brits were my fave writers but the Russkies are rounding the bend on that fast.
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Old 05-02-2008, 05:43 AM
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Started Dog Days. I would compare it to Butcher's Dresden universe. The protagonist is a musician who is also a wizard. It is an OK read so far, but nothing special.

Atrael, thanks for the recommendation I'll look at them when next my queue is empty.

Last edited by Khadaji; 05-02-2008 at 05:43 AM.
  #21  
Old 05-02-2008, 07:04 AM
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Gordon, Bonk's in my TBR pile. If it's as good as Stiff and Spook, I'm expecting a really good time.

I finished What I Was. It was…okay. It held my interest and I didn't expect what happened. I still can't understand for the life of me why her other books are considered YA and this one's not.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:09 AM
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Just finished Mind Wide Open, by Steven Johnson, about the inner operation of the brain. Pretty interesting discussion of the various compartments functioning at different speeds and performing different functions at the same time, the effect of chemicals, etc.

Currently reading Awake, a novel by Elizabeth Graver. First I've read by her, and I'm enjoying it.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:47 AM
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I forgot to mention that I also finished reading Roald Dahl's The BFG to my son. It was decent. If I'd read it as a kid, I'm sure I'd have liked it even more, especially with all the whizzpopping going on.

I'm not sure what we'll read next, but one of the things I really appreciate in a bedtime story are short chapters!
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Old 05-02-2008, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by anu-la1979
I am finishing up The Brothers Karamazov in a leisurely way.
I think it is a toss-up between the Bros. K and Ulysses for book I've started the most and not yet finished. In TBK I've repeatedly run into the Grand Inquisitor like a brick wall, and in U the Cattle of the Sun always take out of me whatever motivation I have left at that point.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:58 PM
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I just finished Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood. I really enjoyed it. I think I'll have a few days' think about it, now. I have a biography of Shakespeare (William, not FU) on my bedside table, but I don't know when I'll get to it. It's hard to read and knit or crochet at the same time, and I'm currently committed to making chemo caps.
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Old 05-03-2008, 12:37 AM
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The rest is noise by Alex Ross
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Old 05-03-2008, 12:57 AM
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I just finished Soon I Will Be Invincible (based on an SMDB recommendation from the "recommend a book with someone with powers" thread) - loved it!! Why aren't there more superhero books??

Last edited by Glory; 05-03-2008 at 12:57 AM.
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Old 05-04-2008, 07:53 PM
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I finished American Gods with an overwhelming sense of disappointment and wtf-ery. The climactic final battle was, borrowing the description from a Goodreads reviewr, an unholy mess and the ending just kind of wandered around aimlessly before dying a pointless death in the sky above Iceland. This sentence from the end of the Author's Note also ticked me off:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil Gaiman
Lastly, I would like to thank my family (...) who, for long periods during the writing of this book, put up with my going away both to write and to find America--which, turned out, when I eventually found it, to have been in America all along.
Um, yeah. Where did you expect it to be, Neil? Paraguay?
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Old 05-04-2008, 09:11 PM
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I just found this thread. Hello.

The missus gave me a Kindle and I'm in the midst of a Wodehouse rash. Cheap, and always pleasant, although cricket makes quiddich look simple. Currently on Love Among the Chickens.

Lest you think me frivolous, I recently read Is Sex Necessary? by Thurber and White. OK, that's frivolous too. How about Borges' Labyrinths? That's so frivolous it's deep. Sins of Scripture by J. S. Spong? The Creation by E. O. Wilson? No, too serious (albeit instructive). Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle?

Quote:
A naked man on a naked horse is a fine spectacle; I had no idea how well the two animals suited each other.


(To be honest, that may be the most amusing thing in the Beagle book, and I'm not entirely sure it was meant to be humorous.)
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Old 05-04-2008, 09:17 PM
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Two out of three books for the first week in May are old school.

Alas Babylon and On the beach.

So far these books offer a weird look at how the end of the world was to be percieved. Only part way through Beach , so I have to wait to see what happens, since I never read the book before and never seen the movie.

To round off the week , I just bought Hilldiggers by Neal Asher

Pro's we get another drone to match sniper and arrak

cons this one seems to be moving slowly

Declan
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Old 05-04-2008, 09:28 PM
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Currently reading: No Country for Old Men. I've already seen the movie and I'm very surprised at how closely it followed the book.

Up next: A Thousand Splendid Suns.

After that, not sure. I'm going home soon and will likely pick through my mom's books. I'm thinking Princess Bride might be calling my name.
  #32  
Old 05-04-2008, 09:36 PM
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I'm reading Hard Men Humble: Vietnam Veterans Who Wouldn't Come Home, by Jonathan Stevenson. It's about Vietnam veterans who choose to live in Southeast Asia and it's pretty engrossing. The men profiled are so different in temperament, politics, educational background and attitudes towards the war that the book seems like a bit of a pastiche of a dozen interesting mens' stories. So far it doesn't draw any conclusions about these guys and I'm not entirely sure what its point is. But then I'm only about 3/4 through.
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Old 05-05-2008, 12:19 AM
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Just finished The World Without Us thanks to several BART trips to SF. Very depressing - you wind up thinking that humanity disappearing would be a good thing.

Now reading Hollywood Urban Legends by Richard Roeper, from 2001. Much better than I expected, though it was pretty amusing reading how Mel Gibson kept his religion to himself.

Next up, our autographed copy of Bonk.. I've read her other two books, and my wife went to see her at Kepler's when I was in DC. I'm looking forward to it.
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Old 05-05-2008, 12:57 AM
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I just finished two books. One is an anthology, The Starry Rift (edited by Jonathan Strahan, I think?)- I'm likely going to reread it, or parts of it, as I go home on Saturday. (My dad and my brother are doing the driving, so I get to read.)

The other was The Fire Rose by Mercedes Lackey, the first of the Elemental Masters series so of course the one I read last.

I don't get to start any new fiction for at least another week, but I plan on picking three authors from The Starry Rift and getting one book from each at the library, once I am home.
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Old 05-05-2008, 06:18 AM
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Just finished Dog Days. Butcher fans take note: If you want something along the line of the Dresden books, here it is. It is not quite as good, but it is his first and may improve. The hero is not as confident, too self-deprecating.

But all in all, not too bad.

Started Mr. Twilight. Not far enough into it yet to have an opinion.
  #36  
Old 05-05-2008, 06:53 AM
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I've decided to dive into the Falco series of Roman detectives by Lindsey Davis, so I'm on The Silver Pig now, and I've just finished The Vesuvius Club by Mark Gatiss (League of Gentlemen, Dr. Who) - a delightful, decadent Edwardian spy romp. With illustrations of ... Beardsleyesque tone.
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Old 05-05-2008, 08:16 AM
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I just read Everybody Into the Pool by Beth Lisick. From the American Library Review:
Quote:
Lisick has sampled most of the alternative culture experiences available to Americans. Currently a prominent figure in the San Francisco arts community, she has contributed to National Public Radio's This American Life and has been a comedian, musician, and actor. Her memoir is made up of loosely connected chapters about being too bizarre for mainstream life but too mundane for the fringes.
So that's what it's about, and it was amusing in parts, but the overall experience just left me irritated with her. Her actions seemed bizarre to me, and at odds with what she says she was thinking. For instance, in high school she gets asked to a formal dance by the guy of her dreams. An hour before the date, her mom comes home with a dress (ugly and the wrong size). She wears it, since of course she has given the matter of what to wear no thought of her own. Huh?
A far more extreme example: She reads that all people are somewhat bisexual. Intellectually, this makes sense to her, so she sleeps with a few women. Although she doesn't feel attracted to any of them, she keeps trying because she figures she just hasn't found the right one yet. Okay, she must be pulling my leg.
Anyway, I could give a lot of examples, but the whole book was a giant WTF for me. I was sufficiently entertained to finish, but I won't be reading any more of her stuff.

I'm two stories in to my next book, The Bloody Chamber, by Angela Carter. It's a collection of beautifully retold fairy tales and I'm loving it. I'm giving this a more careful reading than is usual for me, because the stories really deserve to be savored. Five stars.

Next bedtime story book for my son is Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, by Roald Dahl. I remember that it's not really one of his better books, but I flipped through it the other day and decided to go ahead with it if for no other reason than…Vermicious Knids!
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Old 05-05-2008, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnT
Just finished reading Gone With the Wind. You'd think more people would know about this one.

My wife suggested The Cult of the Amateur: How Blogs, Wiki, Social Networking and the Digital World are Assaulting our Economy, our Culture, and our Values. Reads so far like the screed it is. To give you an idea as to whether or not this guy is serious, the link takes you to his blog. But honestly, he is serious and while he makes some decent points (it's hard to type 200+ pages and not make at least one good point), he comes across like a monk ranting about the printing press allowing losers like Luther to mock the church.

When I'm done with that, I'm going to read William Bernsteins A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World.
I decided to put off the Bernstein in favor of my first reading of The Lord of the Rings, starting with The Hobbit.

I recall reading somewhere that The Hobbit was written as juvenalia, whereas the trilogy had a far more adult style... which I hope to God is true, otherwise I might not make it too far.
  #39  
Old 05-05-2008, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maureen
I finally broke down and ordered Descartes' Error, since Larry Borgia is about the third person in the past month who's suggested it, and I'm easy that way.
Still haven't finished the M. de Sade's Letters from Prison, but am enjoying it tremendously. Last night, I started David Sedaris' Naked, which is hilarious.
There are some technical bits in Descartes' Error that are a bit of a slog, but they're skimmable. The book presents an interesting view of emotion, reason and the self. But I don't have the expertise to spot flaws in his reasoning. Still, it's a good read. Damasio is a good writer and comes off as an engaging compassionate human being.

I'm finishing up the Odyssey and working through an anthology of Space Opera, both books I was reading last month.
  #40  
Old 05-05-2008, 09:45 AM
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I'm reading The Code: Baseball's Unwritten Rules and Its Ignore-at-Your-Own-Risk Code of Conduct by Ross Bernstein. Extremely enlightening: How pitchers decide when to brush back a batter, the politics of the bench-clearing brawl, steroids and drug use (haven't gotten to that part yet). Lots of frank explanations from real players who tell you why they do the things they do.
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Old 05-05-2008, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glory
I just finished Soon I Will Be Invincible (based on an SMDB recommendation from the "recommend a book with someone with powers" thread) - loved it!! Why aren't there more superhero books??
Wasn't that an interesting book? I picked it up on a whim and really liked the point of view of the story. Good book, glad someone else has read it.

I finished up Wrath of a Mad God the latest (and last I think) book by Feist in this particular universe. I liked it better than some of his last offerings, but I'm not sure how I feel about the end.

SPOILER:

There has been repeated critisism that Feist has kept well loved characters around too long through "magic" or other means. But the way he killed off some of the characters was just....wastefull. More like he was killing them just to kill them if that makes sense.
  #42  
Old 05-05-2008, 02:10 PM
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I finished grad school last week and can finally read for pleasure again! Yay! I might even be able to be active in the SDMB Goodreads group! What a concept!

I'm currently in the middle of The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary. So far so good, but I was expecting more of a fictionalized style. Still quite interesting, though.

On my to-read list I have:
  • Books 4-7 of Stephen King's Dark Tower series
  • Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
  • The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations: The Complete Opinionated Guide for the Careful Speaker by Charles Harrington Elster
  • The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements by Eric Hoffer
  • The Art of War by Sun Tzu
  • Linked: How Everything Is Connected to Everything Else and What It Means by Albert-Laszlo Barabasi
  • The Good Guy by Dean Koontz
  • Lucky Man: A Memoir by Michael J. Fox
  • I Am Charlotte Simmons by Tom Wolfe
I have had most of these books since September, and am looking forward to finally getting to them!

On my Amazon wish list I have:
  • Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath
  • The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell
  • Can't Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain, and America by Jonathan Gould
  • 2 Dean Koontz books that aren't released yet
A note on Dean Koontz: He was my favorite author for many years, but lately I've been somewhat disappointed with his stuff (though I wish he'd hurry up and finish Frankenstein!). Still, for some reason I'm still compelled to read him, and I usually have something new of his on my wish list. I can't get away from this guy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyager
Just finished The World Without Us thanks to several BART trips to SF. Very depressing - you wind up thinking that humanity disappearing would be a good thing.
That's also on my list of books to read; I'll keep in mind that it won't be light entertainment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigmagirl
I'm reading The Code: Baseball's Unwritten Rules and Its Ignore-at-Your-Own-Risk Code of Conduct by Ross Bernstein.
That sounds very interesting! I think I'm about to add it to my wish list.
  #43  
Old 05-05-2008, 02:16 PM
Sigmagirl is offline
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It really is! I'm on the part where, while spiking the second baseman is "considered dirty and disrespectful," spiking the first baseman is totally egregious. I'm learning a lot and I think I will be a much more informed spectator from this book.

I thought The Professor and the Madman was far too long and should have been written as a journal article for something like Smithsonian. I'll be interested in your opinion.
  #44  
Old 05-05-2008, 02:32 PM
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Just finished I Capture The Castle by Dodie Smith. I really enjoyed it. It was first published in 1948 but still reads very well. I had never heard of it before I ran across it in Barnes & Noble.

Now I'm reading Truth and Beauty by Ann Patchett. It's pretty good so far.

Next up is Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick. He also wrote In the Heart of the Sea, which I very much enjoyed.

I'm finding I'm reading more and more creative non-fiction these days (though not many memoirs). I like the genre a lot.

Last edited by Jodi; 05-05-2008 at 02:33 PM.
  #45  
Old 05-05-2008, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnT
I recall reading somewhere that The Hobbit was written as juvenalia, whereas the trilogy had a far more adult style... which I hope to God is true, otherwise I might not make it too far.
I recall the Hobbit was easy going the first time, but I stopped partway through Fellowship because it got too scary for my taste. I was in third grade then. I chickened out halfway through Beowulf then for about the same reason. I didn't want to see the hero die. (Not saying he does, if you haven't read it, just that I thought he would.) You can guess I was an early Heinlein fan in those days.

More recently I get uncomfortable when I think the protagonist is being incredibly dense, so I quit before the comeuppance. Emma comes to mind. And I still don't know what happens in part II of Great Expectations. No, don't tell me.
  #46  
Old 05-05-2008, 02:50 PM
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Started The Last Witchfinder today on the train. I got it for Christmas, so I've been long overdue to start it.

I'm also reading The Great Mortality about the Black Death. Lately, I've been trying to read more non-fiction and this seemed morbidly interesting.
  #47  
Old 05-05-2008, 03:27 PM
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TheMerchandise, I enjoyed both of those books. Witchfinder started me on a James Morrow kick, and I've liked all of his stuff, so far.

If more nonfiction books were like Mortality, I'd read more nonfiction. Just enough of the author's personal opinions to add flavor.

I dumped Twilight after about 100 pages. It's kinda sad that this series has such a rabid teen girl following. Why can't they get excited about the good stuff? Maybe it's a puberty thing.
  #48  
Old 05-05-2008, 04:05 PM
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I recently finished re-reading Gaiman's Anansi Boys. I had read it when it first came out, and enjoyed it much more this time, since I read it a bit more slowly. I have a bad habit of barreling through books that interest me, and forgetting what they are about only a few weeks later!

I've just started Guy Gavriel Kay's The Last Light of the Sun. I have no idea why I had this on my bookcase, as I don't remember ever buying it, but a few months back my brother insisted that I read The Lions of Al-Rassan and I enjoyed it, so I figured I might as well give this a shot. I'm not far enough into it to have an opinion of it, yet.

This is, I think, the last book in the house that I haven't read at least once, so I'm either going to have to raid my brother's bookcase again (my usual method of acquiring reading material) or go to a book store. I never know what to buy when I'm there!
  #49  
Old 05-05-2008, 04:27 PM
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Finally sitting down to read the Repairman Jack novels i've let slide for almost a year: Infernal, Harbingers and Bloodlines.

since i only have Bloodlines for a two-week library check-out, and i have the two books to read before i get to that one, my nose is gonna be in a book pretty much around the clock.
  #50  
Old 05-07-2008, 09:43 AM
Eleanor of Aquitaine is offline
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I've started Cryptonomicon, so you won't be hearing from me for a while. I'm 100 pages in, and so far I really like it.

I just finished David Weber's Honor Among Enemies. I'm enjoying this series. It's a bit formulaic, but I get this little thrill at the end of each book when everyone gets pretty much what they deserve. If they survive, that is. The series has an extraordinary body count.
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