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Old 11-15-2000, 02:18 PM
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Gaderene gave me the idea in this thread: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...threadid=46523

My favorite was Wild Cards edited by George RR Martin. It had just about every sort of power, evil, character interaction, disfigurment, power struggle, etc. that you could imagine. Plus, being an alternate history, it was cool seeing the effects that these events had on the world at large.

I was a huge fan of Popinjay, Perigrine, Dr. Tachyon, and The Turtle. I fell out of reading them once I got out of college and missed the last few books, but they were great.
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Old 11-15-2000, 02:28 PM
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The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe.

Shadow of the Torturer
Claw of the Conciliator
Sword of the Lictor
Citadel of the Autarch

Literary genius.

MR
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Old 11-15-2000, 02:34 PM
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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams
mmmmmm...

-or-

the Dune series by Frank Herbert
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Old 11-15-2000, 03:00 PM
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Dune, hands down.
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Old 11-15-2000, 03:11 PM
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Are we talking Sci-Fi or Fantasy here?

For Science Fiction, I'd nominate The Hyperian Cantos By Dan Simmons.

For Fantasy, it's a tie between Stephen R. Donaldson's Thomas Covenant books and Roger Zelazney's Amber series (only the first one, though).

I won't judge a series before it's finished, but if George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire and King's Dark Tower live up to their potentials, I may need to expand my list.
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Old 11-15-2000, 03:14 PM
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Recently I've been reading the Man-Kzin Wars (based on the ideas of Larry Niven) series. I ignored them when they started coming out, but I finally collected and read them all. They're much better than I'd expected, and I recommend them. Some impressive authors have contributed to the series.

My overall favorites "series" isn't what I think you have in mind -- the Ballantine books "Best of [author]" series from the 1970s-early 1980s put together great collections of stories by authors from the golden age and slighly beyond, some of whom had become virtually forgotten (like Raymond Z. Gallun). I still don't have the whole set.


While I really liked "Dune" and the first two sequels (which I read when they first came out), I started losing interest in characters whose ages could be measured in millenia.
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Old 11-15-2000, 04:26 PM
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Wild Cards, definitely. I loved Popinjay, Fortunato, and the Puppetmaster stuff, and the whole mosaic concept behind the stories blew me away. It's so cool how multiple authors could intertwine their stories and plotlines within a single book to create a coherent, arcing narrative. Plus, the books were often funny as hell.

Honorable mention goes to the Hyperion Cantos, mentioned by Alessan, and Hitchhiker's Guide.
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Old 11-15-2000, 04:28 PM
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Sorry about the spelling Gadarene.
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Old 11-15-2000, 04:31 PM
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The Ender's Game series by Orson Scott Card:

Ender's Game
Speaker For the Dead
Xenocide
Children of the Mind

Ender's Shadow
Shadow of the Hedgemon

From,

Anake
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Old 11-15-2000, 04:35 PM
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The Martian Tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs
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Old 11-15-2000, 04:35 PM
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For sheer fun, I can't recommend the Vorkosigan series by Lois McMaster Bujold enough. 15 books and still going strong.
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Old 11-15-2000, 05:18 PM
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Fantasy Series....Tolkien pure and simple is my favorite. A very close second is Pratchetts Diskworld Series.

Where Science Fiction is concerned is a bit more difficult to answer. Dune and its first two sequels are good, but the later works basically ruin much of it. H.Beam Pipers works, if considered as a series of different stories in the same universe, are excellent. The same can be said of Niven's known space works. A true series of SF that is always an enjoyable romp to read is 'Doc' Smiths Lensmen works.
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Old 11-15-2000, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tommy the Cat
Sorry about the spelling Gadarene.
It's all good, Timmy.
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Old 11-15-2000, 05:40 PM
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If you want a fantasy series that may never end, check out the "Dragonlance" books by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman!
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Old 11-15-2000, 06:01 PM
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The hard part of this is that series are never done.

Science Fiction

The Foundation Series, Isaac Asimov. The first three books only. This series was done for 40 years until he started writing them again, unwisely in my opinion.

The World of Tiers, Philip Jose Farmer. Farmer has several good series but I think this is his best (though equal parts science fiction and fantasy), followed by Riverworld (which falls apart at the end, in my opinion).

Dune, Frank Herbert. The first book is so good that the series has to make anybody's list but all the books after the first suck.

Fuzzy Sapiens, H. Beam Piper. It is only two books but they are truly fun. Piper's suicide was a great loss to science fiction.

Mission Earth, L. Ron Hubbard. I've only put this in here to see if anybody is paying attention. The first book actually sets up an interesting universe/idea. The following nine books proceed to destroy any shred of promise contained within the first book.

Current entry: Otherland, Tad Williams. Only the first three books are out and it is already shows signs of wear. It is showing potential, however.


Fantasy

Tolkein. I have never understood the fascination with these books. I enjoyed them as a kid but by the time I reread them as an adult they seemed too juvenile.

The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. I think this series should be in anybody's top five. Yes, most people find it too pessimistic but I think they are missing the point. However, the series manages to use all of the mainstays of epic fantasy without making them cliches. The Second Chronicles are weaker than the first three books but overall it is a fantastic series.

The Riftwar Saga, Raymond E. Feist. Feist has extended this series well beyond the stories useful lifespan but the first series is very good. (It isn't a series but everybody should read Feist's "Faerie")

The Dragonriders of Pern, Anne McCaffrey. This one will gets lots of guffaws but I think if you consider only the early books it is a decent series (the downfall was trying to turn Pern into a Science Fiction universe rather than a Fantasy universe).


You all should know that I am printing out this thread. In recent years I have pretty much given up on Fantasy and Science Fiction because it was becoming increasingly hard to find something worthwile to read. It has been a couple years of mostly non-fiction. I am going to take each and every one of you up on your recommendations and see if you have any taste.
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Old 11-15-2000, 06:10 PM
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Well, whenever I see a thread like this, I am obligated to lobby for Iain M. Banks. While I suppose his novels about the Culture are not necessarily a series (i.e. characters don't recur), they're pretty rewarding reads:

So, my votes:

Consider Phlebas
The Player of Games
Use of Weapons
Excession
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Old 11-15-2000, 06:13 PM
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Titan, Wizard and Demon by John Varley -- it's been years, and I don't even recall the story lines -- just that I really, really enjoyed them

Just echoes from here on out -- Martin's Song of Ice and Fire, the first couple of Dune books, Hyperion and Riverworld.

I'm in the midst of Tigana on the recommendation of people in this thread, and had to say thanks for turning me on to this. It's as least as good as anything I've ever read in fantasy. I'm going to be sorry to see it end.
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Old 11-15-2000, 06:32 PM
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Second:

Foundation

Titan, Wizard, Demon

Add:

The Red Dwarf novels - for the most part a tighter continuity than the TV series, throws in some more interesting stuff - some of which actually seems to have been made cannon for the TV series as of Season 8.

Robotech novelizations/novels - Robotech rocks in general, and the books are 'cleaner' in a way. Since they don't have the animation of the 3 series, they can simply refer to the SDF-II, and not have to worry about the fact that it's not actually there...
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Old 11-15-2000, 06:47 PM
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Whoa! All mine are here: Hyperion/Endymion; Ender; Varley's trilogy (only with CGI could this series EVER make it as a movie, or possibly Toy Story-like animation (I know, it's CGI, too)). I am currently reading Tad williams Otherland saga. So far, so good.

I also read Hubbard's Mission Earth series. This was before I found out about Scientology. It did have some interesting plot devices like the audio/video spy implants.
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Old 11-15-2000, 07:03 PM
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Tengu: Out of curiosity, how many Red Dwarf novels are there? Being an American, I'd only seen the first two until recently, and I just ordered (and finished) Backwards from a Canadian bookstore.* Are there a bunch more that I'm missing?


*It was good, but not as good as the first two. Got better by the end. Grant and Naylor are better together than apart.
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Old 11-15-2000, 07:25 PM
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Unfutunately, the only one I can find right now is Backwards, so I'm going to have to work from memory:

Infinity Welcomes Careful Drivers
Better Than Life
Backwards
Last Man

I think there's one or 2 between Backwards and Last Man, but since I can't seem to find my copy of LM, I can't say for sure.
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Old 11-15-2000, 07:34 PM
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If I recall correctly


When the Bay Area Science Fiction Association (BASFA) had Tad Williams as a guest two years ago, Mr. Williams basically stated that he tries not to write series. He tells a single story, which might take a few volumes to tell and then goes on. I haven't started Otherland yet, but he did state that it would also follow the no series case.

We had Stephen Dedman(sp) in early Oct. He was a bit of a hoot, fit right in.
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Old 11-15-2000, 07:40 PM
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I like some of the previously mentioned series a lot, but I'm not going to just say "me, too." So, here are a couple that haven't been mentioned.

Fantasy: Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn by Tad Williams. The first book is The Dragonbone Chair. Totally enthralling.

SF: The Giants books by James P. Hogan. The first book is Inherit the Stars. This guy is truly the best hard SF writer around today. In a book review (it might have been for Inherit, though I'm not sure), Isaac Asimov once said of Hogan, "Move over, Arthur Clarke." Later, when Clarke reviewed another Hogan work, he said, "As much as it pains me to do so, I must agree with Isaac."
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Old 11-15-2000, 07:46 PM
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Science Fiction:

I love Bujold's Vorkosigan series. They're maybe not great literature, but they are pure entertaiment, and among the most re-readable science fiction books I've ever read.

I also love the "Year's Best" anthology that Gardner Dozois edits every year. I find science fiction to be uniquely well-suited to short story form. This year's Seventeenth Annual edition is not to be missed; Kage Baker's story "Son Observe the Time" alone is worth the hardcover price.

Fantasy:

Dragonriders of Pern? Are you kidding me? obfusciatrist, have you read this since you were fourteen? Whirling opalescent eyes are mentioned on every damn page. Good grief.

Best ever fantasy trilogy is the Riddlemaster trilogy by Patricia A. McKillip. Every book she's written is lovely. The woman is a goddess.
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Old 11-15-2000, 08:06 PM
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I have to second the recommendation on the Man-Kzin wars series. Every author adds a new twist, development, or different way of looking at things. The Kzinti really are a fascinating race; they're not just Tiggery-looking Klingons any more.
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Old 11-15-2000, 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by Jekeira
Dragonriders of Pern? Are you kidding me? obfusciatrist, have you read this since you were fourteen? Whirling opalescent eyes are mentioned on every damn page. Good grief.
Actually, I haven't. I have always attributed my growing disenchanted with the series with the introduction of "scientific" explanation.

Maybe I should have just attributed it to the fact that I was older.

I withdraw the nomination until a hand recount can be performed.

Quote:
Originally posted by Narile
When the Bay Area Science Fiction Association (BASFA) had Tad Williams as a guest two years ago, Mr. Williams basically stated that he tries not to write series. He tells a single story, which might take a few volumes to tell and then goes on. I haven't started Otherland yet, but he did state that it would also follow the no series case.
That is true. The books can in no way stand alone, and each individual book does not really come to any particular climax or cliffhanger.

That said, anything published in multiple parts is going to considered a series by most (we'll ignore). The problem with Otherland, IMO, is that it is growing increasingly unfocused. So many split storylines that some of them seem to only get 10-15 pages in an entire book and seem nothing more than shells.

(And I don't know that I am happy to see Tad Williams bringing the bloat that is killing Fantasy to the SF genre). He is a good writer, though.
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Old 11-15-2000, 08:30 PM
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Re: If I recall correctly


Quote:
Originally posted by Narile
When the Bay Area Science Fiction Association (BASFA) ...
This interests me. Is there any source of information about BASFA more informative that http://www.basfa.org? That site doesn't really tell much other than how to get to a meeting.
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Old 11-15-2000, 08:32 PM
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Forests Of The Night

Emperors Of the Twilight

Specters of The Dawn


by S. Andrew Swann

A great genetic engineering SF series, with an interesting sub-text.
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Old 11-15-2000, 08:40 PM
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Demon Prince series by Jack Vance.

or possibly

Amber series by Roger Zelazny.
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Old 11-15-2000, 09:21 PM
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SF:
The Liaden Universe novels
The Sholan Alliance novels

Fantasy:
Katherine Kurtz's Deryni novels
Michelle West's Hunter's Oath and Hunter's Death
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Old 11-15-2000, 09:24 PM
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I've read so much science fiction, that I could never pick a favorite. I could possibly come up with a page of favorites.

Try reading "The Hobbit" with Jethro Tull's "Heavy Horses" album playing. Sets a great mood for the novel. "Songs From The Woods" "Jack In The Green"
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Old 11-15-2000, 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by obfusciatrist
Mission Earth, L. Ron Hubbard. I've only put this in here to see if anybody is paying attention.
I don't care if that was a joke. I now hate you. Calling that "writing" is like referring to vomit as "gourmet."

One good Sci-Fi series that hasn't been mentioned is the Uplift series by David Brin. I like the fact that he's willing to leave so much in the air, though I can see where that would drive some people nuts.

The Dragonriders series is good for pre-teens. Sadly, I don't enjoy it any more.

I've read just about everything in this thread, and could comment on most of it, but I'll refrain. But I do have to support the George RR Martin series. I just finished the new book 3, and it's getting better and better.

Early Robert Jordan was also good.

Oh, and about Foundation. I recently reread it and was not all that impressed. The first book, in particular, was a thinly veiled allegory about various forces that shape history. There was a chapter on religion, a chapter on military conquest, a chapter on economics, etc.
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Old 11-15-2000, 09:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Smeghead
One good Sci-Fi series that hasn't been mentioned is the Uplift series by David Brin. I like the fact that he's willing to leave so much in the air, though I can see where that would drive some people nuts.
D'oh, an't believe I forgot uplift.

Seconded!

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Old 11-15-2000, 10:08 PM
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I've said it before on this board, but if you haven't read the Gormenghast trilogy by Mervyn Peake, you definitely should. I love that series.

Just a moment ago I found that the BBC has recently done a miniseries on it:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/gormenghast/

Has anyone seen this? How was it? Anyone know where I could catch this in America? (Apparently BBC America has/will run it, but I'd never heard of that channel, much less get it on my cable).
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Old 11-15-2000, 10:29 PM
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As the prototype for most modern space opera, E.E. Doc Smiths' Lensman series is worth a read every decade or two. Nothing gets rid of intergalactic drug lords better than hitting their planet with a moon sized chunk of antimatter precipitated from a space where c is the lower limit for velocity....
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Old 11-15-2000, 10:53 PM
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E.E. Doc Smith - hell, yeah!! Not to mention how the spaceship's navigator whips out his slide rule to plot their course! And anyone who gets around the speed of light limit by saying it was just a theory get points for guts in my book.
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Old 11-15-2000, 11:04 PM
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Re: Re: If I recall correctly


Quote:
Originally posted by obfusciatrist
Quote:
Originally posted by Narile
When the Bay Area Science Fiction Association (BASFA) ...
This interests me. Is there any source of information about BASFA more informative that http://www.basfa.org? That site doesn't really tell much other than how to get to a meeting.
Well, you can ask me. I've been a member for about three years. It is kind of hard to discribe simply, because meetings can go so many ways. Some nights we don't talk about SF at all really, those nights it serves more a purpose of people with similar interests meeting and talking. However, since this is my first such group to be part of, don't really have anything to compare to it. AFIT Amiga Users Group wasn't nearly as organized about things, and I was only 15 at the time.
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Old 11-16-2000, 12:05 AM
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In addition to those books/series listed above, I'll add:

David Weber's Honor Harrington series - Horatio Hornblower goes to the stars, but good military SF.

David Eddings' Belgariad series - Very formulaic fantasy epic series, but his dialog and writing style still tickle me. YMMV

Guy Gavriel Key's Fionivar Tapestry series - Group of college chums are transported to a fantasy world. Key's writing is beautiful even if this setting and plot aren't the most original ideas in the genre.

Glen Cook's Black Company series - A mercenary company in a fantasy setting; pretty good stuff.

David Farland's The Runelords series - The most interesting magic system I've seen in a while.

Gordon Dickson's Dorsai series - Classic SF

Morgan Llywelyn - anything - If you like Irish mythology, you owe it to yourself to read Llywelyn. She is a true bard.

I'd try to rack my brains for more, but if I stay on the computer much longer, my GF is going to kill me.
Happy reading!
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Old 11-16-2000, 12:07 AM
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Robert Asprin's Thieve's World
Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar
George R.R. Martin's Wild Cards
Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy(first three books only!)
Saberhagen's Dracula
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Old 11-16-2000, 12:17 AM
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Frederik Pohl's Gateway series is pretty good.
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Old 11-16-2000, 12:38 AM
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For sci-fi, it's gotta be Dune, or at least the first four books.

Another good one is the recent one by Stephen R. Donaldson of Thomas Covenant fame...the first one is called The Real Story, or something close...anyone want to help me out here?

For fantasy, how about the Michael Moorcock's Elric series, or the Champion Eternal books? And of course, Tolkein.
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Old 11-16-2000, 12:43 AM
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Quote:
Another good one is the recent one by Stephen R. Donaldson of Thomas Covenant fame...the first one is called The Real Story, or something close...anyone want to help me out here?
The Gap Cycle. Very good series. Very intense, but then - that's Donaldson.

Oh, and AuntiePam - no need to thank us. Just spread the word.
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Old 11-16-2000, 01:13 AM
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Wow...so many books, so little time.


I'm just going to respond to in this post to what's been mentioned so far. I'll do another post on my picks in a bit.

First, I'm going to lay two out on the line here that I hated that will probably get me banished. LotR. Loved the Hobbit. Got bored with Frodo's adventures and stopped after book 1. Some others agree with me here, but...

Got bored with Dune too. I know, I know. I might come back to it one day. I just got to about page 120 and stopped. I don't know why. It didn't interest me all that much and I'm as confused as you all are about that.

I don't think I need to tell anyone how good Ender's Game is. I could write a manifesto on just how great it is and convert people to my own speaker for the dead society. Speaking of which, books two and three were great too. 4 dropped off a bit, but I really liked Ender's Shadow. Anake, hate to break it to you, but Shadow of the Hegemon isn't out yet. I wouldn't doubt that it will be great though, I've read the first five chapters.

I agree with the choice of Hyperion. It is one of the slowest moving books that I thoroughly enjoyed. I read parts 1 and 2 about seven years ago and just picked up the second two begining of this year. What a great series. So worth the Hugo he won for it.

obfusciatrist, I was reading too. I'm sorry, but Mission Earth was like warm Diarhea spread across 8000 pages. I stopped after book 2. When two planets and an entire solar system are on the line and the cliff hanger is "Does his teacher fail him?" I just can't go any further. And when I know damn well that he's surviving for the next eight books, I don't need some guy yelling at me in litterally every single page "Oh crap! Is he going to die! I hope he does. No wait, now I hope he doesn't. No wait, let me scream at the reader a bit more." SHUTUPSHUTUPSHUTUP!!!!

Neroman, tell me about Demon Prince. I've read a great short story by Vance called "The men return" and an old novel called Space Opera which I would be surprised if nobody's heard of. But never heard of Demon Prince.

Baraqiyal, Gateway by itself is one of the best books I've read. The series itself goes on a bit too far, even just in four books. I would recommend Man Plus to whoever has bothered to read this far.

And yes, I also loved Hitchhikers and the Dark Tower series (even Wizards and Glass). But for God's sake Stephen, finish it already!!!!!! We're waiting...

Next up, when I get around it it, my recommendations.
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  #44  
Old 11-16-2000, 01:33 AM
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I want to use my first post to put in a vote for Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos novels.

Also I'd second the nominations of Zelazny's Amber And Dickson's Dorsai/Childe cycle novels.
  #45  
Old 11-16-2000, 02:01 AM
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Welcome to the board, eulalia. I hope your stay here is a pleasant one. Just remember, you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.

Quote:
Originally posted by Enderw23
Neroman, tell me about Demon Prince. I've read a great short story by Vance called "The men return" and an old novel called Space Opera which I would be surprised if nobody's heard of. But never heard of Demon Prince.[/B]
::fiddling::

from amazon.com:
Quote:
The Demon Princes is a series of five tales that chronicle Kirth Gersen's quest for vengeance against the five demon princes. The princes led the Mount Pleasant Massacre, a raid that destroyed Gersen's family and his world. But now Kirth is on their trail, and no matter how many galaxies there are to search, he will find them one by one and exact his revenge. [5 books, one per Demon Prince]
I've read Space Opera, and about 40 or 50 other Jack Vance books. He is my dad's favorite author, and we had scads of his paperbacks around my house.

Now I think I'll sit back and enjoy the view while Rome burns.
  #46  
Old 11-16-2000, 07:40 AM
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Jack Chalker's "Well World" books, save the last couple. I found Midnight at the Well of Souls in an English bookstore in Paris on a school trip to France in 1978, devoured it on the plane ride home, and became a Chalker fan. Similarly, I enjoyed his Dancing Gods, Rings of the Master and Four Lords of the Diamond series. It's only when I'm not reading him that I get tired of his pre-occupation with the theme of outward form/inner being.

Robert Asprin's Myth Adventures. I still waiting anxiously for the one in which Skeeve finds himself cast as the villain...

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth books yet. Easily the equal of Jordan, although sent in a completely different direction. And I don't spend half my reading trying to figure out which mythological figure or theme the author has filed the serial numbers off of this time...

Oh, yeah. The various Babylon 5 novels. Unlike, say, the innumerable Star Trek novels, they're all well written, puls they're canon for the TV series. When the show was still in production, you'd often find crosslinks and foreshadowing between the two. You didn't need the books to enjoy the show, but if you had both, there was a very profitable synergy...

-- Bob
  #47  
Old 11-16-2000, 09:05 AM
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obfusciatrist - There is a third Piper fuzzy book: Fuzzies and Other People. It was (at least according to the jacket notes) discovered in a trunk in his basement several years after his death. The whole series is one of my favorites. There are also two non-Piper books, Golden Dreams by Ardath Mahar (sp?) and Fuzzy Bones, can't remember the author.

Scott
  #48  
Old 11-16-2000, 10:19 AM
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now part II


First, a few addendums and stuff.

Neuroman, thanks for the info. It took me quite awhile to figure out what the ::fiddling:: meant. Still, be thankful I didn't call you techchick like I did Falcon last night.

Saltire, I've read Rings of Saturn by Hogan and I found it to be just OK. Certainly good as far as the Hard Sci-Fi aspect of it, but the characters weren't that interesting, and the plot didn't seem to move me. Have you read it? I think he's a good author, but I'm reluctant to pick up a series by him yet.

Now for a few of my picks.

BobSchroeck beat me to it this morning. The Sword of Truth series is excellent. The first book is 800 pages, but you just whip right through it. He sweeps you into this imaginative world filled with so many colorful characters. He understands that bad guys aren't cliches; they're people who have motives and desires just like the good guys. The series deals with Richard Cypher's journey from being a simple woods guide to the most powerful warrior, wizard, and person in history. The endings to each book may seem a tad short, but the stories were never about the conclusion, they were about the journey. Goodkind just came on the scene 6 years ago and this book was his first.

A few more of Orson Scott Card's series are great reads. Alvin Maker is great, although I really did not like the lastest book out. I've tried reading alternate history through Turtledove and just found it boring. This series, though, is so captivating. It's the story of the seventh son of the seventh son who has the powers of "making." Doing positive things for the world, whether that be fixing a fence or creating life. It takes place in the early 1800s and throws in historical characters in alternate professions.

OSC's Homecoming series is also a fabulous read. Maybe a bit of warning. The series is based loosely off the book of Mormon (Card is Mormon). However, this should in no way distract you from your enjoyment of this series if you aren't religious. I was captured by the storyline. Unlike a few of OSC's series, this one didn't fizzle at the end. I left the last book still hungering for more. Basically, it's the tale of Nafai, and others with a gift, and their struggle to leave a planet guarded by a computer system that cares for them and oversees activities. They must gather a group together, find a ship, and travel back to their home, Earth.

I have two questions for those that have are still reading. What do you think of Anne Rice's Vampire series? I read Interview with the Vampire about two months ago and I thought it was just OK. Someone I know said that you had to get through that book before the series really starts to get good. Is this true?

Also, I'm finishing up my latest book today, The Sleeping Dragon which is book 1 in Joel Rosenberg's Guardians of the Flame series. Anyone who has read this want to comment on it? I'd like to reserve my comments until after I've finished (30 pages to go) and until I can hear other people's opinions.
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Puedo tenerz las hamburguesas conz queso?!?
  #49  
Old 11-16-2000, 10:53 AM
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Fantasy: The Belgariad and Mallorean sagas you don't really read for the plot, I read it and loved the characters. I laughed myself silly in parts of those books.
Loved Tolkein, haven't read it in years, tho.
I've got Tad Williams Memory Sorrow and Thorn. Loved it.
And The Sword of Truth series.

Oh, and SciFi.. anyone read Neuromancer? Loved it and the
c64 game.
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  #50  
Old 11-16-2000, 10:59 AM
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Sci Fi or Fantasy series?

I'd vote for the Old and New Testaments. Where're they coming out with the third volume in that trilogy, anyway?
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