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  #1  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:02 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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What the Hell does "Lido Shuffle" MEAN?

I am incredibly clueless when it comes to pop music, and particularly inept at making out the lyrics. One of the Wonders of the Internet is that I can finally make out what the actual lyrics are. The problem is, that frequently doesn't help much.

It doesn't help that the comments I frequently come across, even of this Board (even from the Perfect Master Cecil himself) are frequently one of two types:


1.) Isn't it obvious? (Answer -- No. As I say, I'm clueless)

2.) It doesn't mean anything -- the guy's just trying to get the song to scan, and he'll put anything in there. (I got that omne when asking about Billy Joel's "Always a Woman to Me " -- the line "She can't be connvicted/she's earned her degree") -- I can't always buy this one, either. It's a panacea -- It'll answer any question about the meaning of lyrics.

The thing is, very often the lyrics do mean something. But you need to know the song's backstory (As in the case of Elton John's "Daniel". Extra credit question -- How the hell do the artists expect people to know this? How do they find out?) In other cases my understanding would be greatly enhanced if I knew the particular slang/argot of where the song is set, but I don't.


With all that as background, can someone clue me in to the meaning of "Lido Shuffle"?


1.) What kind of name is Lido? I'll bet it has nothing to do with the topless bunch "Lido de Paris", but that's the only Lido I know.

2.) Why is Lido running? I get the impression he owes somebody something, and is trying to get money from gigs either to pay it back, or to keep running.

3.) "Until he got the note -- "Tow it or blow it"" Huh???? Evedently it's bad news, though, 'cause it makes him run for the border. What's THAT all about?

4.) What the hell is a tombstone bar?


5.) Don't tell me it's all just nonsense to fit the meter. It's pretty clear this isn't "Jabberwocky". And I hate being on the outside of an inside joke.
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  #2  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:26 AM
Argent Towers Argent Towers is offline
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I always assumed Lido was about a small time gambler/con man.
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  #3  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:31 AM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
"Tow it or blow it"
That should be "Toe the line or blow it."

Which makes a lot more sense.

(Well, relative to the rest of the lyrics.)
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Old 07-07-2008, 09:35 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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That should be "Toe the line or blow it."

Which makes a lot more sense.

(Well, relative to the rest of the lyrics.)

Thanks, but I'm still clueless.

"Toe the line or blow it" means ... what?

"Hey, Lido, you gotta pay up or leave? Or is it something else? If he leaves, howcum he's gotta go cross the border? That sounds a lot more serious.
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  #5  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:37 AM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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And looking again at the lyrics after many years, I'm thinking Lido has left his girlfriend and is on a bender of some kind (drugs? gambling? booze? all three?) and she is sending him a note telling him to come home now or forget it. (Toe the line or blow it.)

"Toe the line" means "man up" or "do your part" or "pull your weight" or "fall in line." I take it as his girlfriend telling him to come home and get serious about the relationship or it's over.

Last edited by Spoke; 07-07-2008 at 09:40 AM..
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  #6  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:40 AM
Bob Ducca Bob Ducca is offline
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Makes me think of the Lido Deck on cruise ships. As does Shuffle (as in Shuffle Board).... The One More Shot and Toe the Line bits sound like Shuffleboard as well.
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  #7  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:43 AM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Originally Posted by HelloNinja
Makes me think of the Lido Deck on cruise ships. As does Shuffle (as in Shuffle Board).... The One More Shot and Toe the Line bits sound like Shuffleboard as well.
Whatever he's singing about, I'm pretty sure it's not shuffleboard.
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  #8  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:47 AM
elmwood elmwood is offline
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Maybe there's some 1970s slang in there that was frequently used in popular music, not unlike "stone in love" or "steal away". The song might have made perfect sense when it was released, but today sounds like nonsense.

Last edited by elmwood; 07-07-2008 at 09:47 AM..
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  #9  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:53 AM
jayjay jayjay is online now
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For the longest time I'd convinced myself that this song was by Elton John. It was only when the local oldies station started playing it and I heard the DJ note that it was Boz Skaggs that I realized I was wrong.
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  #10  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:55 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Are you telling me that it's not just me and my legendary cluelessness? That other people don't know what this is about, either?

Are ALL pop songs like "Jumping Jack Flash"? -- people just sing 'em or listen to 'em without knowing or caring what the hell they're about?

Last edited by CalMeacham; 07-07-2008 at 09:55 AM..
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  #11  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:57 AM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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Ahh...this is the song that I always sang as:

"Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold
Lido waiting for his soup, Lido"

Maybe that will help shed meaning.
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  #12  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:01 AM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Over at this site, a poster reached a similar conclusion to mine:

Quote:
So, heres my basic analysis and some questions I have:

Lido is a small time hustler and gambler. He's fed up with his life, maybe he suffered some setback (Lido missed the boat that day) so he leaves his home town (he left the shack But that was all he missed and he ain't comin' back) (where ever that may be, Tombstone, Arizona? from the reference to the tombstone bar). He heads to Chicago (Chi-town), intent on winning big playing craps (put the money down, let it roll).

A handle is a bottle of liquor, in case you didn't know. I just learned that recently.

He just wants to win big once and then he's out (He said one more job ought to get it, One last shot 'fore we quit it, One more for the road)

Apparently things are going well for Lido, (Lido be runnin', havin' great big fun) until he gets a note from his girlfriend or wife telling him to shape up or she's leaving him (until he got the note Sayin' toe the line or blow, and that was all she wrote) at which point he quits gambling and eagerly heads home with his winnings (He be makin' like a beeline, headin' for the borderline
Goin' for broke)
A different poster says a "handle" is a gambling stake.
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  #13  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:05 AM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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I always thought 'She can't be convinced / she's earned her degree', that the degree in question was her MRS.
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  #14  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:07 AM
Bosstone Bosstone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
Are ALL pop songs like "Jumping Jack Flash"? -- people just sing 'em or listen to 'em without knowing or caring what the hell they're about?
Probably not all, but...yeah, wouldn't surprise me.

Interesting you mention Jumping Jack Flash; it's one of a bunch of pop songs in the game Elite Beat Agents. Each song is set to a scenario, and more often than not the song has nothing to do with the scenario. My favorite is one in which a retired baseball player proves to an adoring young fan that he still has major-league skills...set to Good Charlotte's Anthem. The music is peppy and fits the action well, but once you understand the lyrics, the cognitive dissonance is liable to make your head explode:

I don't ever wanna be like you
I don't wanna do the things you do
'Cause I don't ever wanna
I don't ever wanna be you

This is a total hijack to the specific question in the OP, but hey.
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  #15  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:17 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
Over at this site, a poster reached a similar conclusion to mine:
That interpretation helps a lot, but I still don't think it covers it.

1.) Just because the line says "...and that's all she wrote" doesn't mean that he got a note from a lady. I've heard the slang "and that's all she wrote", and it means -- "and that's all it/he/she said. That's the end." I think this guiy is taking it much too literally.

2.) There has to be something more srerious involved. Unless the "run for the border" is another bit of slamnf (I suspect it isn't) , Lido's in big enough trouble with the law or the Mob or whatever that he feels he's gotta get out of the country.

3.) I never would have thought of him as a con man or gambler. The "gig" terminology and other things make it sound like he's a musician, getting money for playing his gigs. But I concede it makes more sense the other way.

4.) I never heard of either slang meaning of "handle"
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  #16  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:19 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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I always thought 'She can't be convinced / she's earned her degree', that the degree in question was her MRS.
It's not "convinced", it's "She can't be convicted", which, despite what was said on these Boards when I brought that up earlier (by you? I don't recall) , doesn't mean at all the same thing to me.

Last edited by CalMeacham; 07-07-2008 at 10:20 AM..
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  #17  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:20 AM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
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Just a guess...but especially in older drinking establishments one still runs into bars where the bartop itself is made from polished marble or granite; just like tombstones. Sounds to me like Lido pulled into such an tavern in a car he boosted from a jukejoint and either stuck the place up or swiped money from the cash register. That the money is described as his " handle off the top" makes me lean toward the idea that he just snatched the cash from the till. He then lands in Chicago and, it seems to me, commences to gambling with the money and otherwise living it up.
The song is about a small-time lowlife on a bender. His wife wants him to come home and toe the line i.e. live like a square, but Lido isn't having any of that.

Last edited by Scumpup; 07-07-2008 at 10:21 AM..
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  #18  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:35 AM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
3.) I never would have thought of him as a con man or gambler. The "gig" terminology and other things make it sound like he's a musician, getting money for playing his gigs. But I concede it makes more sense the other way.
Well now that's interesting. I never really looked at it that way, but you could look at the gambling references as a metaphor for trying to make it in the music business.

By the time he wrote this song, Skaggs had been in the business a long time without much success. Maybe this song describes his last attempt to "make it" before hanging it up. He's out on the road playing gigs, trying to find success, and his girlfriend is urging him to give up the dream, come home, and get a 9 to 5 job. He's taking a gamble on making it in the music business.

The Tombstone bar might be a small gig he takes to get a little money so he can afford to head to Chicago.

Last edited by Spoke; 07-07-2008 at 10:38 AM..
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  #19  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:37 AM
plnnr plnnr is offline
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The "handle" is the amount of money wagered on an event at a race track or casino. "The race handle was $2,000,000" means the facility "handled" that much money on that race.
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  #20  
Old 07-07-2008, 10:54 AM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Sabbath
I always thought 'She can't be convinced / she's earned her degree', that the degree in question was her MRS.
Darn. I always heard it as 'earned her decree', as in, she's got a get-out-of-jail-free card. So it wouldn't matter if she was convicted.
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  #21  
Old 07-07-2008, 01:48 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spoke-(Quoting someone else)

Apparently things are going well for Lido, (Lido be runnin', havin' great big fun) until he gets a note from his girlfriend or wife telling him to shape up or she's leaving him (until he got the note Sayin' toe the line or blow, and that was all she wrote) at which point he quits gambling and eagerly heads home with his winnings (He be makin' like a beeline, headin' for the borderline, Goin' for broke)
The last lines about the borderline and going for broke suggest to me that he is NOT going home, and is ignoring the summons from his girlfriend -- instead he is doubling down on his debauchery.
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  #22  
Old 07-07-2008, 02:16 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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I can't advance the answer anymore than it has already, but just to add a personal observation: I heard the song many times before I saw the title. I thought it was the "Lido Shovel."
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  #23  
Old 07-07-2008, 02:18 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
Are ALL pop songs like "Jumping Jack Flash"? -- people just sing 'em or listen to 'em without knowing or caring what the hell they're about?
Pop songs are more about conveying emotional messages than literal ones. Some lines really don't mean anything in particular. And as for inside jokes, the audience is usually not expected to find out the "secret meaning." Songwriters and composers write different songs for different reasons, but conveying explicit messages is not the most common one.
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  #24  
Old 07-07-2008, 02:48 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
Pop songs are more about conveying emotional messages than literal ones. Some lines really don't mean anything in particular. And as for inside jokes, the audience is usually not expected to find out the "secret meaning." Songwriters and composers write different songs for different reasons, but conveying explicit messages is not the most common one.
I'm not sure I belie ve this. Frequently there IS an intended obvious meaning -- if you can make out the damned words, and the subject isn't obscure. If that weren't the case, people wouldn't have any reason to be annoyed at others for thinking "Every Breath You Take" is some sort of love song, instead of being a stalkerish fantasy.
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  #25  
Old 07-07-2008, 03:11 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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I don't think I expressed myself clearly. I don't mean to say that there isn't often an intended, obvious meaning, but that it isn't always dependent on the exact words used. Lyrics in a pop song are more expressionistic tools rather than literal ones. Yes, they might convey a specific meaning or a general feeling, but examining them word-by-word and trying to understand the exact meaning of each line and each word in that line is not usually the key to understanding the message.
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Old 07-07-2008, 03:26 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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I don't think I expressed myself clearly. I don't mean to say that there isn't often an intended, obvious meaning, but that it isn't always dependent on the exact words used. Lyrics in a pop song are more expressionistic tools rather than literal ones. Yes, they might convey a specific meaning or a general feeling, but examining them word-by-word and trying to understand the exact meaning of each line and each word in that line is not usually the key to understanding the message.
No, I understood yopu. But you can't deny that the literal words actually mean something and are agents in expressing that meaning. Certainly others on this Board feel that way. If they didn't, we wouldn't have as many threads about what lyrics mean and how ignorant people are about them on these Boards. And we've had plenty of those threads.
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  #27  
Old 07-07-2008, 03:36 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
I'm not sure I belie ve this. Frequently there IS an intended obvious meaning -- if you can make out the damned words, and the subject isn't obscure. If that weren't the case, people wouldn't have any reason to be annoyed at others for thinking "Every Breath You Take" is some sort of love song, instead of being a stalkerish fantasy.
I agree with this - and to use your example from earlier - Jumping Jack Flash. You can find the lyrics on line easily these days - I had to suss them out on my own back in the day. But anyway, the basic gist of the song was "I was down, but now everything's cool" - and the verses are Mick using different ways to express how down he was - I was drowned, I was washed up left for dead - and the chorus always comes back to "but it's all right now - in fact it's a gas." I always have assumed that the narrator of the song has gotten high or something - so their troubles aren't gone, but at least they are all right now - so Jumping Jack Flash to me was a reference to getting high on something so life would be a gas...

FYI - He used the exact same approach for a song called You Got Me Rockin' off one of their more recent albums. He uses the verses to describe how bad it has been, but now things are better because...well, You Got Me Rockin'...

The point being that there IS some meaning to that particular song...but most folks just dig the groove of it...

Last edited by WordMan; 07-07-2008 at 03:38 PM..
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  #28  
Old 07-07-2008, 04:36 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acsenray
I don't think I expressed myself clearly. I don't mean to say that there isn't often an intended, obvious meaning, but that it isn't always dependent on the exact words used. Lyrics in a pop song are more expressionistic tools rather than literal ones. Yes, they might convey a specific meaning or a general feeling, but examining them word-by-word and trying to understand the exact meaning of each line and each word in that line is not usually the key to understanding the message.
It seems like some artists are more prone to this expressionism than others. Remembering the oldies, Stevie Nicks and Elton John were (are?) both particularly prone to the practice.
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  #29  
Old 07-07-2008, 04:42 PM
astro astro is offline
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First I think the era the song refers to is 40's & 50's not contemporary

Lido missed the boat that day he left the shack
(left home/ small town)

But that was all he missed and he ain't comin' back
(no regrets in leaving)

A tombstone bar in a jukejoint car, he made a stop
(unclear - a dive bar of some kind, possibly a bar in a railroad car - these were very popular in the 30's - 50's)

Just long enough to grab a handle off the top
(he won some money gambling at cards)

Next stop Chi town, Lido put the money down and let it roll
(he's using the bar winnings to bankroll his action in the big city)

He said one more job ought to get it
One last shot 'fore we quit it
One more for the road
(all refer to taking one last shot at whatever his gambling/con/hustle speciality is)

Lido be runnin', havin' great big fun, until he got the note
Sayin' toe the line or blow, and that was all she wrote
He be makin' like a beeline, headin' for the borderline
Goin' for broke
("All she wrote" is not referring to a woman but is simply an idiomatic phrase that means "that's it" - he got some sort of warning from the underworld/gangster associated club owners/powers that be to cool it or else, so he's moving on to the next opportunity)

Sayin' one more hit ought to do it
This joint ain't nothin' to it
One more for the road
(he's done in Chicago time to move on)
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  #30  
Old 07-07-2008, 04:51 PM
eleanorigby eleanorigby is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GargoyleWB
Ahh...this is the song that I always sang as:

"Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold
Lido waiting for his soup, Lido"

Maybe that will help shed meaning.

Thank you. I read the lyrics and the song started in my head, but I could swear that the written lyrics are not the ones I know to that song. Trouble is, I can't dredge up "my" lyrics.

I do recall, "making for a beeline, going for broke".

Maybe this song is up there with Louie, Louie for inarticulateness. And I don't know the backstory on "Daniel". I know the backstory on "Someone Save My Life Tonight" and "Empty Garden".


Oh! <raises hand>

The tombstone bar = the bar is empty, probably rundown and skanky.

Jukejoint car--some kind of old beater, but with some panache.

But I never heard any of the above in the song when it was popular.

Last edited by eleanorigby; 07-07-2008 at 04:53 PM..
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  #31  
Old 07-07-2008, 06:05 PM
RMutt RMutt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astro
Sayin' one more hit ought to do it
This joint ain't nothin' to it
One more for the road
(he's done in Chicago time to move on)
This helps explain why it's called Lido "Shuffle." Maybe it's a reference to his lifestyle, shuffling around the country/world looking for more action. I think he's a gambler too, also because of the word shuffle.
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  #32  
Old 07-07-2008, 06:21 PM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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Originally Posted by RMutt
This helps explain why it's called Lido "Shuffle." Maybe it's a reference to his lifestyle, shuffling around the country/world looking for more action. I think he's a gambler too, also because of the word shuffle.
I think it has multiple meanings, like those above but also he's calling a song and/or dance a "shuffle." There are others like swing, twist...this one's a shuffle. I can't find a cite; always thought it was slang.

ETA hate to bring it up b/c it was heinous, but remember the Bears "Superbowl shuffle"?

ETA 2: Harlem Shuffle dates from 1963
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlem_Shuffle

Last edited by lobotomyboy63; 07-07-2008 at 06:24 PM..
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  #33  
Old 07-07-2008, 07:20 PM
eleanorigby eleanorigby is offline
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But shuffle goes with the gambling theme and the song is too fast for anyone to shuffle to, unless they are so wasted that's all they can do....


I remember the super bowl shuffle. And my dad used to sing "shuffle off to Buffalo".



I'm old.

Last edited by eleanorigby; 07-07-2008 at 07:20 PM..
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  #34  
Old 07-07-2008, 07:29 PM
astro astro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eleanorigby
But shuffle goes with the gambling theme and the song is too fast for anyone to shuffle to, unless they are so wasted that's all they can do....


I remember the super bowl shuffle. And my dad used to sing "shuffle off to Buffalo".

I'm old.
Old.. nah... I just think you're here looking for trouble.
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Old 07-07-2008, 08:35 PM
eleanorigby eleanorigby is offline
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Originally Posted by astro
Old.. nah... I just think you're here looking for trouble.

"I'm just here struttin' for fun, struttin' on down for everyone!"

Last edited by eleanorigby; 07-07-2008 at 08:35 PM..
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  #36  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:26 PM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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Originally Posted by eleanorigby
But shuffle goes with the gambling theme and the song is too fast for anyone to shuffle to, unless they are so wasted that's all they can do....
In music, a swung note or shuffle note is a rhythmic device in which the duration of the initial note in a pair is augmented and that of the second is diminished. Also known as "notes inégales", swung notes are widely used in jazz music and other jazz-influenced music such as blues and Western swing. A swing or shuffle rhythm is the rhythm produced by playing repeated pairs of notes in this way. Lilting can refer to swinging, but might also indicate syncopation or other subtle ways of interpreting and shaping musical time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shuffle_note

Like so many things, it's hard to differentiate one genre from the other; it doesn't strictly have to be danceable to be shuffle, I think. I'm imagining dancing to it; I think it would have that jerky kind of feel to it.

In the swing era, swing meant accented triplets (shuffle rhythm), suitable for dancing. With the development of bebop and later jazz styles independent of dancing, the term was used for far more general timings. There is much debate over use of other ratios than 2:1 in swing rhythms.
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  #37  
Old 07-07-2008, 09:47 PM
eleanorigby eleanorigby is offline
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Hmmmm... that gives the phrase, "shuffle off this mortal coil" a whole new subtext.
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  #38  
Old 07-08-2008, 07:16 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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astro's explanation seems logical and consistent, and has the ring of plausibility to it. I agre with his interpretation that "that was all she wrote" being idiomatic, and not reffering to any particular lady (and I said so in post #15), and I'm surprised at how many people take that literally. The rest makes sense, and my only quibble is that the reference to "headin' for the borderline" makes it sound as if Lido's reasons for leaving sound pretty serious -- or is that a normal circa 1930's-50's way of saying your leaving town?



Still unanswered:

1.) What kind of name is "Lido"? I've never heard it as a name, and all I can think of is "Lido de Paris". Or maybe the head of Houise Atreides, misspelled. Neither seems appropriate.

2.) Not relevant to this song, but from my OP:
Quote:
But you need to know the song's backstory (As in the case of Elton John's "Daniel". Extra credit question -- How the hell do the artists expect people to know this? How do they find out?)
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  #39  
Old 07-08-2008, 08:15 AM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is online now
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I will never be able to enjoy listening to this song again.












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  #40  
Old 07-08-2008, 08:45 AM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
[1.) What kind of name is "Lido"? I've never heard it as a name.
Lee Iacocca's given name is Lido.
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  #41  
Old 07-08-2008, 08:58 AM
Freddy the Pig Freddy the Pig is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spoke-
That should be "Toe the line or blow it."

Which makes a lot more sense.
No, I think it's just "toe the line or blow". Blow was formerly used more often to mean "leave"--as in, let's blow this joint, or I'm bored, I'm gonna blow. Either toe the line or blow--either behave or get out. Nowadays if you say "blow" people start thinking about blow jobs. Or blowing chow.
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  #42  
Old 07-08-2008, 12:11 PM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
I agree with his interpretation that "that was all she wrote" being idiomatic, and not reffering to any particular lady (and I said so in post #15), and I'm surprised at how many people take that literally.
We understand that "that's all she wrote" is idiomatic. We just believe Skaggs is playing with the idiom by using it literally, just as Hank Williams had done a generation earlier in Dear John:

Well when I woke up this mornin'
there was a note upon my door
said don't make me no coffee babe
cause I wont be back no more,
and thats all she wrote, "Dear John,
I've sent your saddle home."


Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddy the Pig
No, I think it's just "toe the line or blow".
You're right; I misheard the lyric. The sentiment is the same, though: Straighten up or beat it.

Last edited by Spoke; 07-08-2008 at 12:13 PM..
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  #43  
Old 07-08-2008, 12:26 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
We understand that "that's all she wrote" is idiomatic. We just believe Skaggs is playing with the idiom by using it literally
Why? Nothing else in the song suggests he's got a woman waiting for him back home, unlike the Hank Williams example you give.
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  #44  
Old 07-08-2008, 12:33 PM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
Why? Nothing else in the song suggests he's got a woman waiting for him back home, unlike the Hank Williams example you give.
Yeah there is. "Lido missed the boat that day he left the shack."

He's shacked up with someone; and he missed the boat on that relationship by cutting out to do whatever it is he's doing. (Gambling, if you read the song literally, perhaps pursuing a music career if you take the song as metaphor.)
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  #45  
Old 07-08-2008, 12:44 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Yeah there is. "Lido missed the boat that day he left the shack."
That's REALLY a stretch. A "shack" is a house or a pla ce to live. Aside from the term "shacking up" there's nothing about it to suggest another person -- and that's quite a stretch.
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  #46  
Old 07-08-2008, 03:04 PM
Spoke Spoke is online now
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham
Aside from the term "shacking up" there's nothing about it to suggest another person -- and that's quite a stretch.
The note came from someone.
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  #47  
Old 07-08-2008, 08:33 PM
MisterThyristor MisterThyristor is offline
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I always figured it was a gambling thing myself, most of the slang in the song is gambling related. What seems to have happened in Chicago had to be serious, he's not just leaving town, he's headed out of the country (borderline). Maybe he owed some money to the mob, and a friend of his who was also connected, told him he better either come up with the money or really leave town, and fast. But, being addicted to gambling, he's already got his next game (or con, if you think he's a scam artist instead of a gambler) all planned out.
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  #48  
Old 07-08-2008, 11:19 PM
Snooooopy Snooooopy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
I can't advance the answer anymore than it has already, but just to add a personal observation: I heard the song many times before I saw the title. I thought it was the "Lido Shovel."
Oh, that's actually the sequel. The bad guys catch up to Lido before he reaches the border, and they force him to dig his own grave before they shoot him.
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  #49  
Old 07-09-2008, 07:50 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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My take on this song is that Lido is a small time crook who's decided to live fast and die young. He stole some money from the local mob ("grab a handle off the top") and now they're looking for him. So he's evading them as long as he can (the shuffle) and spending the money but eventually he'll be caught and killed.
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  #50  
Old 07-09-2008, 09:40 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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My take:

Lido screwed something up (missed the boat), probably related to gambling debts and money belonging to loan sharks/mobsters and took off (left the shack) in a once-flashy but now run-down (juke-joint) car. He stole money (grabbed a handle off the top) from a bar in the boonies where old drunks go to die (tombstone bar). (Or maybe he stole money he was transporting for the mob.) He went to Chicago and gambled his stolen money. He got a message from his former employers telling him to straighten up or else (toe the line or blow it). He dropped his fooling around (that was all she wrote) and headed for Mexico.

Last edited by Acsenray; 07-09-2008 at 09:41 AM..
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