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  #1  
Old 10-07-2008, 04:06 PM
Bear_Nenno Bear_Nenno is offline
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The New Colossus. What is "storied pomp"?

Okay I give up. What the hell is storied pomp. Someone please translate that line into plane English for me.
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  #2  
Old 10-07-2008, 04:09 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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It's just what it says.

Pomp: 1. Dignified or magnificent display; splendor: the solemn pomp of a military funeral.

Storied: 1. Celebrated or famous in history or story: the storied journey of the Mayflower.

So "storied pomp" means a magnificent display celebrated or famous in story.
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:19 PM
sailor sailor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bear_Nenno View Post
Okay I give up. What the hell is storied pomp. Someone please translate that line into plane English for me.
What's "plane English"? Is it what air pilots use?
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:40 PM
Giles Giles is offline
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"Storied" has two meanings, one derived from "story" (i.e., a tale or work of fiction), and the other derived from "storey" (i.e., a level in a building). The latter can be also spelled as "storeyed", but "storied" is more common in the U.S. So "storied pomp" could refer to magnificent buildings. I think that meaning would fit the line better:
Quote:
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
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Old 10-07-2008, 05:58 PM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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I don't think this is a matter of opinion. Storied referring to buildings is wrong. In this context it absolutely refers to the long history of celebrating ancient lands, a history that the U.S. lacked.

Don't forget that the opening lines refer to the Colossus of Rhodes:
Quote:
Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
That was the old Colossus, celebrated in song and story, that she is specifically comparing our New Colossus with, neither one of which have stories in the building sense either.
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  #6  
Old 10-07-2008, 06:14 PM
mwbrooks mwbrooks is offline
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Originally Posted by sailor View Post
What's "plane English"? Is it what air pilots use?
Plane English is sort of flat and featureless. Hyperbolic English is the more exciting stuff that you find in advertising copy. Then there's Spherical English, in which parallel construction is used to make a point.
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Old 10-07-2008, 06:15 PM
WF Tomba WF Tomba is offline
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The "fame" meaning is a much more straightforward interpretation. The other would involve a weird metaphor that isn't hinted at elsewhere in the poem.
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Old 10-07-2008, 06:16 PM
WF Tomba WF Tomba is offline
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Originally Posted by mwbrooks View Post
Plane English is sort of flat and featureless. Hyperbolic English is the more exciting stuff that you find in advertising copy. Then there's Spherical English, in which parallel construction is used to make a point.
Bloody brilliant. Quip of the year.
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Old 10-07-2008, 06:24 PM
DeptfordX DeptfordX is offline
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Originally Posted by mwbrooks View Post
Plane English is sort of flat and featureless. Hyperbolic English is the more exciting stuff that you find in advertising copy. Then there's Spherical English, in which parallel construction is used to make a point.
Bravo
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Old 10-07-2008, 06:48 PM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwbrooks View Post
Plane English is sort of flat and featureless. Hyperbolic English is the more exciting stuff that you find in advertising copy. Then there's Spherical English, in which parallel construction is used to make a point.
FWIW, Jesus was fond of parabolic English. (well, parabolic Aramaic, actually, but in translation....)
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  #11  
Old 10-07-2008, 07:21 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwbrooks View Post
. . . Then there's Spherical English, in which parallel construction is used to make a point.
There's no parallel in Spherical English, unless you go off on a tangent or two. And it's utterly pointless.

Geodesic English, on the other hand . . .
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