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  #1  
Old 10-20-2008, 10:21 PM
torie torie is offline
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Can you get a High School Diploma AND a GED?

I heard a story in which someone tested for and earned their GED while they were training for a management position at a fast food company (at 15), then went on to graduate High School and get their diploma. This doesn't sound right to me. Can that be done? Google is failing me.

Last edited by torie; 10-20-2008 at 10:21 PM..
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  #2  
Old 10-20-2008, 10:36 PM
Spezza Spezza is offline
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I don't see why not. The question would be why? Why waste the money and time to get both?

From personal experience, the GED people don't care about you, they care about getting paid. You pay them, they test you, you pass (or you fail if you're a nimrod, and even that is probably too generous).

Universities and colleges, not to mention employers, have criteria that must be followed for entrance into their programs. This is where the GED comes into play. From experience I know, you can apply as a mature student, but you must have been out of school for so long. You can apply with your GED, but the same standards apply; you cannot just drop out of school at 16 and apply for university with your GED (YMMV).
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Old 10-21-2008, 01:42 AM
Seven Seven is offline
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Originally Posted by Spezza View Post
....you cannot just drop out of school at 16 and apply for university with your GED (YMMV).
I did.

Ok, it wasn't university it was community college.

There was no time requirement to be out of high school before I tested for the GED and entrance into the college only required I passed the GED exam.

Seems to me there was a special something I had to do because I was not yet 18 years old. I forget what it was at this point. I'm sure it was just a parent consent form or something.

I was still high shcool age when I got my GED so I could have gone back to high school and finished my diploma if I wanted. But, as I was in college already, why bother.
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:24 AM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is online now
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I dropped out of high school, didn't get my GED and enrolled in the nearby state university. (Ok, there were some requirements like GPA and SAT/ACT scores to meet, too.) I dropped out of that university after two years, then *many* years later enrolled at a community college to get a nursing degree. Still no GED or high school diploma at this point. When it came to applying for my license is where I hit a wall. No diploma, no license. I was able to get a high school diploma through an adult high school that is dated 2 months after my college degree.
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  #5  
Old 10-21-2008, 08:07 AM
WPA-Guy WPA-Guy is offline
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I work for an agency that provides GED classes (along with other education services).

In our state, Pennsylvania, you cannot get both a diploma and a GED. If you are under the age of 18 and have dropped out of school, you cannot take the GED test until your High School class has graduated. (There are a few exceptions involving employment, post-secondary requirements, and court orders.)

We do, though, have people in our classes that have a High School Diploma, but need extra help with math, reading, or writing skills in order to enroll in college or trade schools. In a strict sense then, we offer Adult Basic Education classes, not GED classes.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:19 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Originally Posted by Seven View Post
Sems to me there was a special something I had to do because I was not yet 18 years old. I forget what it was at this point. I'm sure it was just a parent consent form or something.
I enrolled in a 4-year university when I was 16 and didn't have to get parental consent for anything.
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  #7  
Old 10-21-2008, 11:13 AM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is online now
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I, too, dropped out of high school and got a GED and then enrolled in college at 17. When I applied to the private liberal arts college I graduated from, I found out they didn't even care about the GED, since I had taken a couple of classes at the local state school and gotten A's. I always wished I hadn't gotten the GED, just so I could argue with employers and grad schools that wanted a diploma as well as a bachelor's degree. I'd probably have ended up having to get a post-college GED like Cub Mistress did.
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Old 10-21-2008, 11:36 AM
NinjaChick NinjaChick is offline
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Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
I enrolled in a 4-year university when I was 16 and didn't have to get parental consent for anything.
How? You can't legally enter into any sort of binding contract - such as agreeing to pay the university - without parental permission before you're 18.
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Old 10-21-2008, 11:45 AM
doreen doreen is offline
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Both of my kids enrolled in college before they turned 18- and I didn't have to sign anything. However, they didn't sign contracts of any kind . They registered for classes, and the tuition was due before classes began. If it wasn't paid, the registration was cancelled. I suppose if we had signed up for the monthly payment plan (administered by an outside company) I would have had to sign something
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  #10  
Old 10-21-2008, 01:13 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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My SIL is now a full professor of clinical psychology and a practicing clinical psychologist. Before that, she was a chemical engineer. She never got a high school diploma or a GED. She dropped out of high school and ran away from home at 16 and made an unconventional academic route starting with the community college system a couple of years later to accomplish this over many years.

My younger brother was almost expelled from high school because of one of those nightmare zero tolerance policies that you here about on the news (a friend left a rusted antique knife like object in the back of my brother's pickup). The expulsion proceedings were underway when my mother just had him drop out and spend what would have been his senior year in community college instead. My brother has a 4 year degree from a very reputable university now and is now trying to become a Coast Guard officer.

There is a standard way of doing things but you don't have to do it that way if you know what you are doing. The community college systems will allow someone to recover from just about anything anytime. I am sure you could get all the GED's and high school diplomas you want especially if you mix different states but there is little point to it.

Last edited by Shagnasty; 10-21-2008 at 01:15 PM..
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  #11  
Old 10-21-2008, 01:24 PM
Gfactor Gfactor is offline
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Originally Posted by NinjaChick View Post
How? You can't legally enter into any sort of binding contract - such as agreeing to pay the university - without parental permission before you're 18.
Infants (or minors) are bound by contracts for neccessaries like education, at least in some cases. http://books.google.com/books?id=7MY...um=2&ct=result

http://books.google.com/books?id=uLd...um=9&ct=result

Of course, That doesn't mean that the school has to enter into such a contract.
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  #12  
Old 11-12-2012, 01:32 PM
kas ra kas ra is offline
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My kid was 16 when he got his GED, and he started college immediately. He WAS allowed to enter into a contract with the college, and if I wanted access to his records, HE had to approve it and fill out forms to allow me to do so. If that's not a contract, I don't know what is.

Last edited by kas ra; 11-12-2012 at 01:33 PM..
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  #13  
Old 11-12-2012, 02:36 PM
Johnny Bravo Johnny Bravo is offline
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To answer the question in the OP (old as it is):

It depends on the state. In some states, the act of taking the GED tests classifies you as an adult learner and disqualifies you from earning a standard HSD. In other states you can have a GED and a HSD no problem.

Why would you do that? Well, you probably wouldn't get your HSD and then your GED later. That would be silly. But you might get your GED because it's faster and easier and then later earn your HSD to make it easier to get a job. At California Job Corps Centers, the trade instructors will often try to convince students who have already earned their GEDs to enroll in the on-site HSD programs because it makes them more employable.

Regarding community colleges and GEDs:

Many community colleges will happily take a student with a GED, or even a student with a diploma from a diploma mill. They'll test you and then put you into prep courses that are basically high school level and charge you full tuition for them. It's easy money for the college.
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