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  #1  
Old 11-28-2008, 11:00 PM
Bacon Salt Bacon Salt is offline
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Why did my fudge not turn out right?

So, today I decided I would make fudge for the first time. I used the recipe from Good Eats and followed all of the instructions almost exactly. The difference was that I melted the mixture in a double boiler before transferring it to direct heat (had to take care of something else while it was melting and didn't want to have to keep an eagle eye on the candy) and I used a bulb thermometer.

When I went to stir the fudge when it hit 115, it was hard, about the consistency of caramel. It tasted great, but it was like a gourmet Tootsie Roll- no crystallization at all. Now, I don't like fudge and I really liked the Tootsie Roll texture, but I set out to make fudge, damnit!

I mention the bulb thermometer because I then went and checked if maybe it was mis-calibrated but it was measuring at most five degrees below what it should.

So, what did I do wrong?
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  #2  
Old 11-28-2008, 11:03 PM
MoodIndigo1 MoodIndigo1 is offline
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It would help if you posted a link to the recipe, or copied it. I've been making fudge all my life, all kinds, so it would help to know what ingredients you used.

BTW. for most fudge recipes, you really have to give your full attention to the cooking.
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  #3  
Old 11-28-2008, 11:13 PM
Bacon Salt Bacon Salt is offline
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What the hell... I thought I included the link.

Recipe

Episode transcript with more detailed instructions
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  #4  
Old 11-28-2008, 11:36 PM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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It didn't turn out right...in what way? It's been a long time and IANA chemist but:

Fudge is like a supersaturated solution. At room temp, the other ingredients can dissolve X amount of sugar. When you heat the ingredients to a certain temperature, they can dissolve much more. The trick is to cool it slowly and not create any vibrations around it. If you bump it, the sugar can come out of solution and then you have an uber grainy fudge-like product. My mom used to put a little cool water in the kitchen sink and set the pan of fudge in it.
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  #5  
Old 11-28-2008, 11:46 PM
MoodIndigo1 MoodIndigo1 is offline
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Bacon Salt, neither of those links leads to the recipe. Can you copy and paste it?

Lobotomyboy63, he/she doesn't describe it as sugary or grainy, but as almost like a chewy caramel.
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  #6  
Old 11-28-2008, 11:51 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is offline
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Was it this one? The site uses frames, and it's hard to link to individual pages.

I don't know anything about making fudge, but I know about Web sites. heh
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  #7  
Old 11-29-2008, 12:14 AM
Bacon Salt Bacon Salt is offline
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Okay, I'll try this again.

http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Seaso...udgefactor.htm

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html

And yes, the "fudge" was smooth like caramel or taffy or a Tootsie Roll, not grainy-ish like the fudge I know.

Maybe I did it right and I've been eating crappy fudge my whole life?

Edit: Yes! It worked! Take that, internet!

Last edited by Bacon Salt; 11-29-2008 at 12:16 AM..
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  #8  
Old 11-29-2008, 07:17 AM
JaneSaintClair JaneSaintClair is offline
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I'm guessing that your previous fudge experiences were with the products of those easy, no-bake recipes that use a lot of powdered sugar. IMHO, this isn't fudge at all. It has a grainy, sugary texture that I'm just not fond of. When these are deposited as gifts at my house, they promptly go into the trash.

Fudge is supposed to be creamy and smooth-- like a very soft caramel in texture, but a little bit squishy and spreadable. I'm guessing that at one point or another your temp got too high-- even 5 degrees can make a big difference in candy-making. That would result in more liquid evaporating and a chewier texture like the one you described. And I agree with the other posters-- you really need to keep a good eye on fudge when you cook it. It's more like making candy than baking as far as technique goes. Lots of chemistry.

But, if you like the results, go with it! Home-made tootsie rolls sound YUMMY!
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  #9  
Old 11-29-2008, 07:56 AM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoodIndigo1 View Post
Lobotomyboy63, he/she doesn't describe it as sugary or grainy, but as almost like a chewy caramel.
Ah, my bad!

Here's a recipe that I used and it turned out well. Super easy. Wow, I haven't made it in a looooong time.

2c sugar
1 stick butter
6 oz chocolate chips
sm can Carnation milk
1 tsp vanilla

Put sugar, milk, and butter in a pan on low heat till butter melts. Bring to a boil 8 minutes, remove from heat. Add vanilla, chocolate chips, stir till thick.
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  #10  
Old 11-29-2008, 08:00 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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With candy making the moment the candy thermometer says the correct temperature you have to cool it immediately. The highest temperature directly reflects how much water remains in the product. The candy thermometer indicates the candy is getting hotter after you remove the pan from the flame. Use a non breakable pan to make the candy and set it in cold water immediately. Once the temperature reading on the candy thermometer shows the candy is cooling you can stop cooling it in the water. Allowing the temperature to raise any amount beyond the correct stage will make it harder than you wanted it.

Always keep a large bowl of cold water handy to cool off the candy encase of accidental contact with your skin.

Last edited by Harmonious Discord; 11-29-2008 at 08:03 AM..
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  #11  
Old 11-29-2008, 03:54 PM
Bacon Salt Bacon Salt is offline
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Okay, from what everyone's said, this is what I did wrong:

1) Used a thermometer that was mis-calibrated.
2) Didn't write down the recipe, necessitating my running back and forth from the stove to the laptop to check to see if I was doing it right.
3) Kept the candy on the stove (recipe said something about carryover) to cool down instead of yanking it and plunging it into cold water.

I'll remember that tip about having a bowl of cold water nearby. I normally manage to splash something on me every time I cook something new so it's some kind of miracle I didn't burn the hell out of my hand.

Thanks, everyone. I'll try to make the fudge again and I'll let you know how it turned out.
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  #12  
Old 11-29-2008, 06:36 PM
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It sounds to me like the candy got to hard ball stage, instead of soft ball stage. Soft ball is about 234 -238 degrees. You test it by putting a bit in cool water and it should form a single soft mass, not fall to pieces or be too firm. Too firm is the hard ball stage.

You don't need to quench the pan in water, but you do need to actually remove from a heat source and place it somewhere it will start cooling. I use my empty steel kitchen sink. A cool enamel counter also has worked well for me. The key is that both are metal and draw the heat out.

After placing the pan where it can begin to cool, put any butter and flavoring, like vanilla into the pan, but don't stir until the butter melts. You don't have to cool it fully to 130, but once you start beating, you can't stop, so if it is too warm to handle, don't start beating. I beat mine in a stand mixer as soon as the butter melts and I can pour the mass into the mixer without the heat coming off it burning me.

Once the gloss is gone, immediately turn out onto a buttered surface and press flat. My guide to the gloss being gone is the mixture looks like chocolate butter cream frosting and not a thick syrup.

Oh, and using sweetened condensed milk is cheating, unless it is garlic fudge.
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  #13  
Old 11-29-2008, 06:57 PM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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All the recipes I found (that were in straightforward, easy-to-read format - ie, not the Good Eats-style) involved condensed milk. What's a good recipe for someone who wants to do home-made, 'real' fudge, then?
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  #14  
Old 11-29-2008, 07:52 PM
lee lee is offline
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Old-fashioned Fudge
2/3 C milk
1/3 C cocoa

2 C sugar
dash of salt
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar (optional, I never have this)
1 tsp vanilla


Mix cocoa, salt, and cream of tartar, and sugar in a bowl, this helps the cocoa not to clump.

Butter pan bottom and sides to discourage large crystals.
Add milk and sugar-cocoa mixture in pan over low heat until sugar and cocoa are dissolved.
Cook and stir over medium
Heat till soft ball stage. Remove from heat.

Add 2-3 Tbls butter. Let cool till butter is melted
(or a little longer if you want). Add vanilla. Beat until it loses its gloss and is ready to set up. Pour onto buttered pan and let
cool.

Maple Fudge

2 cups maple syrup
3/4 cup 10 per cent cream (half and half)
2 tablespoons butter

Boil uncovered, until a drop in cold water forms a soft ball (236
to 238 degrees F). Cool to lukewarm without stirring. (110 degrees
F). Beat until creamy. Turn into buttered 8-inch square pan.
Cut into squares.

GARLIC FUDGE!
4 Tbls. butter
6 cloves garlic, peeled and blanched.
2 cups sugar
1 cup evaporated milk
a pinch of salt

Cook all ingredients together until sugar dissolves. Remove garlic and bring to a rolling boil until soft ball stage. Remove from heat. Stand 5 minutes. Beat until stiff and pour onto greased cookie sheet. Cut into squares. Store in air tight container.
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  #15  
Old 11-29-2008, 08:27 PM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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Garlic, huh? I may pass on that one. Thank you for the other recipes, though!
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  #16  
Old 11-29-2008, 08:36 PM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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Oh, and since Google has failed to give me a consistent answer (there are answers that suggest it's anywhere from 2 days to 6 months - I kid you not), I put it to the SDMB chefs: how long can you keep this stuff in the fridge for?
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  #17  
Old 11-29-2008, 09:10 PM
Bacon Salt Bacon Salt is offline
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Oh man, that maple fudge and garlic fudge both look awesome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bites When Provoked View Post
I put it to the SDMB chefs: how long can you keep this stuff in the fridge for?
Depends on how much the people in your house like fudge.
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  #18  
Old 11-29-2008, 09:14 PM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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*grin* Well, I suppose that's true. I was mainly thinking in terms of pre-making for gifts - do I need to do it a couple of days out, or can I start, say, next weekend and just store it 'till it's needed?

Fortunately we had a major run on (purchased) fudge just recently, so now's the time to make it - while we still can't look sideways at the stuff without thinking 'Oh, god, no.' It'll last just fine for a few weeks, from that point of view.
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  #19  
Old 11-29-2008, 10:15 PM
lee lee is offline
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Since the sugar content is so high, it does keep for a very long time, as in I have never seen fudge go moldy or otherwise biologically bad when kept in a sealed container at room temperature. But, fudge does go stale. It is best when it has some moisture left in it. I like to wrap it in plastic cling wrap as soon as it is room temperature, either a bunch of pieces wrapped together, or each piece wrapped individually.

If you are making it for a gift, I would try not to make it too far ahead, wrap it tightly and give promptly, and don't mark it "Do not open until Christmas." If they don't get around to eating it for quite a while, it will not make them sick, and it will probably still taste yummy, but it won't have that creamy mouth feel that really good, fresh fudge has.
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  #20  
Old 11-29-2008, 11:07 PM
laughingboy laughingboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bacon Salt View Post
I'll try to make the fudge again and I'll let you know how it turned out.
For best results, sprinkle liberally with bacon salt.
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  #21  
Old 12-04-2008, 09:24 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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OK - you guys have got me inspired to try to make fudge - I have never done so. I have memories of my mom doing this when I was fairly young, and it was the labor-intensive sort involving a candy thermometer. Then she got that easy version involving marshmallow fluff which was just nasty. Blech. Never tasted right.

I did get her old recipe from her, and IIRC it was exactly the same as the one from Hershey - here.

Some questions though:
- It just says "milk". Would the fattiness matter (whole vs skim)?
- It says "Remove from heat. Add butter and vanilla. DO NOT STIR". Does this mean that I literally pull the pan off the stove, perhaps cool by setting in a pan of water as others have suggested, dump the butter/vanilla on top, and let the butter/vanilla float on top until the bottom layer has cooled a bit?
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  #22  
Old 12-04-2008, 10:22 AM
Carson O'Genic Carson O'Genic is offline
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The straight dope of fudge online used to be T.P. Skaarup. Once reading his exegisis the fudge acolyte could parse any recipe for viability and render any recipe with assurance. The original pages are no longer available, but there is this, www.skaarupfudge.com which may render similar assistance.
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  #23  
Old 12-04-2008, 11:31 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
OK - you guys have got me inspired to try to make fudge - I have never done so. I have memories of my mom doing this when I was fairly young, and it was the labor-intensive sort involving a candy thermometer. Then she got that easy version involving marshmallow fluff which was just nasty. Blech. Never tasted right.

I did get her old recipe from her, and IIRC it was exactly the same as the one from Hershey - here.

Some questions though:
- It just says "milk". Would the fattiness matter (whole vs skim)?
- It says "Remove from heat. Add butter and vanilla. DO NOT STIR". Does this mean that I literally pull the pan off the stove, perhaps cool by setting in a pan of water as others have suggested, dump the butter/vanilla on top, and let the butter/vanilla float on top until the bottom layer has cooled a bit?
First this is from the page.
Quote:
Remove from heat. Add butter and vanilla. DO NOT STIR. Cool at room temperature to 110F (lukewarm). Beat with wooden spoon until fudge thickens and just begins to lose some of its gloss. Quickly spread into prepared pan; cool completely.
I interpret it to mean:
Set the fudge pan on a cool burner.
Drop in the butter and vanilla.
Leave it set until the candy thermometer you left all this time in the fudge reads 110F.
Mix it all together until the gloss starts to disappear. Be quick and don't mix longer than you need to.
Quickly spread into pan. Being slow and messing with fudge when it cools gets you chocolate sugar.

You're on your own about substituting skim milk.
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  #24  
Old 12-08-2008, 09:05 PM
lee lee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
OK - you guys have got me inspired to try to make fudge - I have never done so. I have memories of my mom doing this when I was fairly young, and it was the labor-intensive sort involving a candy thermometer. Then she got that easy version involving marshmallow fluff which was just nasty. Blech. Never tasted right.

I did get her old recipe from her, and IIRC it was exactly the same as the one from Hershey - here.

Some questions though:
- It just says "milk". Would the fattiness matter (whole vs skim)?
- It says "Remove from heat. Add butter and vanilla. DO NOT STIR". Does this mean that I literally pull the pan off the stove, perhaps cool by setting in a pan of water as others have suggested, dump the butter/vanilla on top, and let the butter/vanilla float on top until the bottom layer has cooled a bit?
I use whole milk, my mother used 2%, my grandfather preferred Poor Man's fudge which is made with water instead of milk. The main effect is that the less fat in the fudge, the quicker it dries out and goes stale. It also affects the texture a bit.

The reason I don't just put the pan on a disused burner to cool is that on my gas stove, there is very little in contact with it, so there is nothing to draw the heat out and it takes a very long time to cool, and may get quite a bit hotter before it starts to cool from the heat in the pan going into the fudge rather than the air, which can't take very much heat away quickly. If you have a disused burner on your electric stove that is cool enough you could touch it, that would be an excellent place to set it to help take the heat away quickly and do nicely to cool the fudge and not let it get much hotter before it cools.


Poor Man's Fudge

2 cup sugar
1/3 cup cocoa
Dash salt
2/3 cup water

2 T butter or margarine
1 teaspoon vanilla

Combine sugar, salt and cocoa, add water in a heavy pan with the bottom and sides buttered. Cook on medium heat, stirring gently until it reaches the soft ball stage.
Remove from heat . . . and you know the drill.
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  #25  
Old 12-08-2008, 09:10 PM
lee lee is offline
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The key about not messing with the fudge as it cools is that if you start to stir and then stop before it is fudge, it is very likely to crystallize and become as Harmonious Discord calls it. chocolate sugar. I know from experience that the 110 temp is not magic, but just a temperature that is cool enough that you would not have to leave off stirring by hand because the pan is too hot. If you have mechanical means to stir and a heat proof mixing bowl, you can start with it quite a bit hotter.
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  #26  
Old 12-15-2008, 02:43 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lee View Post
The key about not messing with the fudge as it cools is that if you start to stir and then stop before it is fudge, it is very likely to crystallize and become as Harmonious Discord calls it. chocolate sugar. I know from experience that the 110 temp is not magic, but just a temperature that is cool enough that you would not have to leave off stirring by hand because the pan is too hot. If you have mechanical means to stir and a heat proof mixing bowl, you can start with it quite a bit hotter.
Ok - so if I were to take the stuff of the stove, dump the butter / vanilla in, and pour it immediately into the Kitchenaid (not that I'd own such a thing), theoretically I could mix it right away?

I did at least find out why a wooden spoon is recommended: metal would conduct heat too well (thereby burning the cook's hand) and plastic would a) melt, or b) break. So I've added a wooden spoon to my shopping list. The Skaarup page suggested buttering that first, also.
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  #27  
Old 12-15-2008, 03:55 PM
ouryL ouryL is offline
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Most times, it's because of the liquid to solid ratio.
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  #28  
Old 12-16-2008, 07:40 AM
lee lee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Ok - so if I were to take the stuff of the stove, dump the butter / vanilla in, and pour it immediately into the Kitchenaid (not that I'd own such a thing), theoretically I could mix it right away?

I did at least find out why a wooden spoon is recommended: metal would conduct heat too well (thereby burning the cook's hand) and plastic would a) melt, or b) break. So I've added a wooden spoon to my shopping list. The Skaarup page suggested buttering that first, also.
I have dumped into my kitchenaid when it was about 140 F or so. I would not try to beat it at anything over 110 by hand. I have used a plastic wooden spoon when beating by hand, as well as good quality wooden spoons. Some newer wooden spoons were not up to the task and broke.
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  #29  
Old 12-16-2008, 11:05 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Reporting back:

The mixture in the saucepan foamed up to about 3x its original volume when it started boiling - guess the viscosity + the amount of steam being released made it do that. As it cooked, it definitely reduced. There was a fair bit of stuff clinging to the saucepan above the liquid - I removed *some* of that with a damp paper towel but I suppose some wound up in the final product that I poured out. I boiled it until the thermometer read 235 - right in the ballpark of the various recipes / webpages, and allowed for about a degree of error in the thermometer (which I'd tested earlier).

I set the pan in cool water in the sink to dump some heat - not absolutely sure that was necessary from what I read above but I figured it couldn't do any harm.

I couldn't tell what temp it was when I dumped it into the Kitchenaid. Pretty warm - the outside of the metal bowl was uncomfortable to the touch. I did scrape the bottom of the pan, and the sides as far as they'd been covered during boiling, with a rubber spatula (did not scrape the upper portions of the pan). I ran the mixer on low until it lost its gloss, though it still felt somewhat warm to the touch. That took a while - maybe 10 minutes. I poured it into the prepared pan and let it set overnight

The pan-licking bits were sort of caramelly when Moon Unit and I sampled them. The bits we tasted after scraping the Kitchenaid bowl were more grainy in texture.

The resulting fudge - cut just a few minutes ago - really brought back the memories, taste-wise. The texture was familiar also. A bit grainy rather than creamy, which I guess either meant both Mom and I messed up the same way, or the recipe is bound to wind up this way. The cubes were a bit soft - they weren't obviously losing their shape (I'll check later to see if they're recognizable still!) but I could mush them in my fingers somewhat. Undercooked? Too humid? Just right?

If this stuff is still edible in 24 hours, I may actually try to make some up and send to my brother. But any suggestions as to what (if anything) I should try different next time would be gratefully accepted!

The Skaarup page someone linked to is very informative. I don't know that I'll try any of his recipes, as most of them seem to involve marshmallow fluff (what's *with* that????). But one more round of the Hershey stuff, and I may try to branch out.
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  #30  
Old 12-16-2008, 11:35 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Oh - and here's a scary aside:

I went to epicurious.com to see if they had any interesting-looking fudge recipes. Typed "fudge" into the search box. Saw the first few results. Saw the bar to the left where you can refine your results by things like meal, type of dish, ingredient.

"Ingredient". Hmmm - maybe they'll have chocolate listed there and I can narrow it down.

::scans list:::

Almond... Amaretto... Apple... ... coffee... ... cream cheese... ... strawberry... vanilla... venison...

VENISON??????? At least it says there's only one matching recipe!

So I followed the link, and found that one ingredient is
Quote:
1/2 to 1 ounce gjetost or Norwegian fudge cheese (Ski Queen), sliced
. Whatever that is.

I'm so relieved! Garlic sounded bad enough, Actual *game*? downright scary!
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  #31  
Old 12-16-2008, 01:53 PM
CrazyCatLady CrazyCatLady is offline
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Oh, I *love* Ski Queen cheese. It's a type of hard goat cheese with an almost caramelly color and flavor. Nom. I could see it working very well with venison. But in fudge? I dunno.
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  #32  
Old 12-16-2008, 03:30 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyCatLady View Post
Oh, I *love* Ski Queen cheese. It's a type of hard goat cheese with an almost caramelly color and flavor. Nom. I could see it working very well with venison. But in fudge? I dunno.
Shoulda clarified: The dish was some sort of venison dish with juniper berries and goat cheese:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...e-Sauce-235001

- it got picked up in the search for "fudge" because of the name of the cheese (Epicurious's search results can be too broad at times). No actual fudge involved!
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  #33  
Old 12-16-2008, 03:44 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bacon Salt View Post
When I went to stir the fudge when it hit 115, it was hard, about the consistency of caramel. It tasted great, but it was like a gourmet Tootsie Roll- no crystallization at all. Now, I don't like fudge and I really liked the Tootsie Roll texture, but I set out to make fudge, damnit!
If you don't like fudge, why did you decide to make fudge?
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  #34  
Old 12-16-2008, 07:59 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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This recipe should go over well with the Dopers in general, and with the OP in particular (note that it's not a true cooked fudge so it's sort of cheating).
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  #35  
Old 12-19-2008, 12:31 AM
lee lee is offline
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I start the mixture on low to medium heat and make sure all the sugar crystals dissolve before I allow it to boil, backing off the heat if need be. I also cook it to about 238 F instead of 235. The higher temp gives it a firmer texture; you may want to try 236 For 237 F first. Did you butter the sides of the pan on the inside all the way up?

Last edited by lee; 12-19-2008 at 12:32 AM..
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  #36  
Old 12-19-2008, 09:10 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lee View Post
I start the mixture on low to medium heat and make sure all the sugar crystals dissolve before I allow it to boil, backing off the heat if need be. I also cook it to about 238 F instead of 235. The higher temp gives it a firmer texture; you may want to try 236 For 237 F first. Did you butter the sides of the pan on the inside all the way up?
I did butter the sides, though some stuff still stuck. Will have to remember to start it off slower before boiling.

The end results have been quite edible. "Grainy" is perhaps too harsh - it doesn't quite feel like tootsie rolls on the tongue, but there's a faint, very fine, grain on the tongue. The fudge remained soft but not melting, when stored at room temp. The second batch I nearly screwed up - forgot to put the butter / vanilla on top when I took it off the heat (oops!) but I tossed them in quickly before adding it to the mixer, and that seemed to sort things out.

It took quite a while for the stuff to lose its gloss that time - beat, beat, beat, beat, beat, beat, beat..... beat, beat, beat, beat.... look away for a minute... WHOOPS! Quickly scraped it into the prepared dish, and let it sit overnight to solidify, and the results were just as tasty.

I mailed off a couple small containers to my brother in IL - we'll see how well it survives shipping

(and I have to hand it to my oldest kid - when allowed to have just two small pieces for dessert, he made them last for 10 minutes. I'd have inhaled them in 1 minute, tops).
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  #37  
Old 12-19-2008, 09:21 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Website reached by googling "science of making fudge" - very informative:

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking...pe-fudge.html#

This recipe is very similar to the one on Good Eats - slightly different quantities of sugar and chocolate.
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  #38  
Old 12-19-2008, 10:48 AM
lee lee is offline
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The fine grainyness sounds like fudge; it is not as smooth as a tootsie roll. When it crystalizes the bad way, grains can be 3 mm across or more and it is crunchy.
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  #39  
Old 12-19-2008, 05:46 PM
runcible spoon runcible spoon is offline
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Ok, as long as we're talking about fudge...

So, I found a few recipes online for Peanut Butter Fudge - even Alton Brown has one. Since my sister likes peanut butter - a LOT - I figured I'd give it a shot. As far as I can tell, it's completely different to make from fudge - you're basically just heating up the peanut butter and adding sugar. So, does anyone know if this will have the same consistency as fudge? I'd think not... anyone have a recipe that's more, well, fudgy in texture?
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  #40  
Old 12-19-2008, 11:18 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runcible spoon View Post
Ok, as long as we're talking about fudge...

So, I found a few recipes online for Peanut Butter Fudge - even Alton Brown has one. Since my sister likes peanut butter - a LOT - I figured I'd give it a shot. As far as I can tell, it's completely different to make from fudge - you're basically just heating up the peanut butter and adding sugar. So, does anyone know if this will have the same consistency as fudge? I'd think not... anyone have a recipe that's more, well, fudgy in texture?
Here's one that involves actual cooking (though I've never made it and never will - due to allergies we're peanut-free).
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Grandpa...ge/Detail.aspx
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  #41  
Old 12-28-2008, 11:16 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Finally had a failure! (does that make me a real cook or something?).

Followed Alton Brown's recipe. I had made it once, successfully. Had enough ingredients for a second batch so I tried that yesterday.

Got to the "put a lid on it for 3 minutes" step and realized I'd forgotten the corn syrup. Whoops. Quickly stirred that in, then did the lidded boil.

After that, I attached the thermometer and let it cook until 234-235 degrees. Oddly, when I tested drops of it in cold water, the drop didn't seem all that homogeneous - more like specs of very dark, suspended in lighter syrup - but the thermometer and the drops all said "soft ball". So I cooled it down - probably to about 170 (which was about where I'd cooled the previous batches) then into the KitchenAid. It looked normal enough - though there wasn't the really thick layer stuck to the bottom of the saucepan like there was with the previous batch - I hardly had to scrape the bottom of the pan at all whereas with the previous batch, if I hadn't scraped the bottom, there would hardly have been anything in the mixing bowl. The bit I tasted didn't feel right in the mouth, either.

Beat, beat, beat.... beat, beat, beat..... beat, beat, beat.... finally it got "matte" and when I tasted a bit it had that finely-grained mouthfeel.

Into the pan, a few hours of cooling, and I pressed gently on the top - too much give. Pulled it out by the foil lining (I line the pan with butter-covered foil, that way I can get the whole mess out onto a flat surface for easy slicing). Cut into pieces, ate one - tasted good but a bit softer than expected.

Figured this was one for the fridge so I popped it into the fridge. Tried a bit this morning - the pieces were no longer distinct. Though they had firmed up quite a bit. Oh well. I re-cut the squares (which were visible, just the cut no longer went through the bottom of the slab).

I guess I didn't cook it quite long enough despite the thermometer - either that, or the lateish addition of the corn syrup really made a difference!
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  #42  
Old 12-28-2008, 11:23 AM
vison vison is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2007
If the recipe calls for Carnation EVAPORATED Milk use evaporated milk, which is milk that has had part of its water content evaporated.

Eagle Brand CONDENSED milk is a different product, it is sweetened.

The two products are NOT interchangeable. Both can be used to make perfectly nice fudge, but the recipes and methods are not the same.

Sorry if this has been mentioned, I haven't read over the whole thread as I have been dealing with a bloated llama and am waiting for the vet and hanging around Cafe Society whilst I do so.
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  #43  
Old 12-30-2008, 08:25 AM
lee lee is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2000
I made the peanut butter fudge and it turned out well.

I think the reason your fudge merged was probably the late addition of the corn syrup.
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