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  #51  
Old 01-15-2009, 08:34 AM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
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Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
For that matter, why doesn't Uncle Henry have an Oz analogue?
He does, but it took the Dope to make this clear. Firt, note that in the 'real world' of Kansas, Uncle Henry is Auntie Em's significant other. Then in the dream scenes that make up most of the movie, magic is sporadic in its occurrence and impacts on Dorothy and her companions., not a steady state of predictable, manageable events, but a seemingly raandom sort of skip magic.
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  #52  
Old 01-15-2009, 12:23 PM
Ellakite Ellakite is offline
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Originally Posted by ch4rl3s View Post
That being said... Holy cow, that movie was about sex... nothing but sex from beginning to end.
The multi-colored horse? Dorothy's desire for a "non-white Stallion" to service her.
Her little dog? Sometimes a dog is just a dog, but that makes it beastiality.
The flying monkeys? OMG. That is so perverse I can't even go on...

(tongue firmly in cheek.)
Of course it's *ALL* about sex! Most fever dreams usually are. But I personally think this is most clear in examining the characteristics of Dorothy's travelling companions:

SCARECROW: Appears at the first crossroads, which represents Dorothy choosing a sexual partner and/or technique. Dorothy becomes confused, and concerned that she may choose the "wrong way". The Scarecrow, however, interjects that *ALL* methods are good, and she shouldn't be afraid of experimenting. He even explicitly states that there's nothing wrong with bisexuality: "This way is a very nice way. It's pleasant down that way, too. Of course, some people do go both ways."

TIN MAN: Obviously a manifestation of mechanical "marital aids". He is immoble and impotent until Dorothy and The Scarecrow arrive, but becomes extremely animated once they oil him up. The Tin Man admits to being without any feelings himself, but sings about seeking passion and fulfillment. Upon seeing how well The Tin Man performs, Dorothy and The Scarecrow both eagerly accept him as a new member of their menage.

THE "COWARDLY" LION: Appears during a discussion of zoophilia/animal contact, which all members of the party (including the Scarecrow) are extremely reluctant to explore. However, despite the obvious references to bestiality, the Cowardly Lion's true purpose is to introduce the concept of BDSM play to the group. He starts off presenting himself as a Top, but doesn't have the experience to perform the role properly and can't maintain the illusion of Dominance for very long. He then switches duties and offers his services as a Bottom to Dorothy & Co. , which they find very appealing.

I've got more, but my lunch break is ending.

Last edited by Ellakite; 01-15-2009 at 12:25 PM.
  #53  
Old 01-15-2009, 12:26 PM
SkipMagic SkipMagic is offline
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Originally Posted by Polycarp View Post
He does, but it took the Dope to make this clear. Firt, note that in the 'real world' of Kansas, Uncle Henry is Auntie Em's significant other. Then in the dream scenes that make up most of the movie, magic is sporadic in its occurrence and impacts on Dorothy and her companions., not a steady state of predictable, manageable events, but a seemingly raandom sort of skip magic.
I'm not so random as I just don't keep to a schedule.
  #54  
Old 01-26-2009, 07:17 AM
Dude Mann Dude Mann is offline
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I think you're forgetting a secondary but still important concept: Escapism.

Oz represents, for all its "danger" and "evil", everything that Dorothy can't find in her home of boring dustbowl Kansas... Adventure, obviously. There's nothing to do around the farm, especially with Em's instructions to, basically, stay out of the way. What about leadership? She has three physically more imposing characters following her every move. Power is another concept... Those ruby slippers of hers are supposedly of great power, though only demonstrated twice in the film. General stimulus in the form of vibrant color. Being where she is, color is a very hard thing to come by in great quantity, hence her amazement at the psychic's trailer. Color may be a representation of many things, but I'm willing to take it at face value for now. It's emphasized a great deal in the movie: The emerald city, the ruby slippers, the yellow-brick road... Even the horse is vibrantly-colored.

Just a thought.
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