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  #1  
Old 01-26-2009, 06:58 PM
Linty Fresh Linty Fresh is offline
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Technique for getting ice off the windshield

When I was a kid, a friend of mine taught me a technique for taking care of thick layers of ice on the windshield.

Basically, as far as I remember it, he used the ice scraper to chip the ice off a corner of the windshield, and then somehow gave it a good whack with the scraper, which cracked the ice so that you could peel it off the windshield in pieces instead of having to actually scrape it off. The hell of it is, I remember chipping out the corner, but for the life of me, I can't remember what to do next.

Does anyone use this technique, and if so, what am I forgetting?

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 01-26-2009, 07:20 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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I’ve never heard of that method. And it sounds like an excellent way to crack your windshield. And I seriously doubt it would work.

I live in snow country. 6 months out of the year I have ice and snow on the windshield.

Nothing beats a good scraper and brush. And if you can, just pre-heat your car, get the defrosters working on it.

I've been scraping serious snow and ice off my car for a long, long time. And so has everyone else I work and play with. If there was a magic way to do it, I would really, really like to know.
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  #3  
Old 01-26-2009, 07:25 PM
JSexton JSexton is offline
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I did this during the recent ice storm in Oregon. As near as I can tell, it only works when it's something like freezing rain that develops a thick sheet of ice. When it's just frost that's formed overnight, you still have to scrape.

The technique is just like you described. Whack the ice with the butt of the scraper, and it cracks into shards. A little sideways force, and they fall right off.
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  #4  
Old 01-26-2009, 07:30 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Originally Posted by JSexton View Post
I did this during the recent ice storm in Oregon. As near as I can tell, it only works when it's something like freezing rain that develops a thick sheet of ice. When it's just frost that's formed overnight, you still have to scrape.

The technique is just like you described. Whack the ice with the butt of the scraper, and it cracks into shards. A little sideways force, and they fall right off.
Yes, but be careful: I've broken a couple scrapers being a little too aggressive whacking the ice lke this, and while they are cheap, if you don't have another scraper handy it's incredibly inconvenient to not have one when you really need it.

PS CD cases (the clear plastic front part) work great as frost scrapers in the event you break your scraper. Just sayin'

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  #5  
Old 01-26-2009, 09:37 PM
Gbro Gbro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linty Fresh View Post
When I was a kid, a friend of mine taught me a technique for taking care of thick layers of ice on the windshield.

Basically, as far as I remember it, he used the ice scraper to chip the ice off a corner of the windshield, and then somehow gave it a good whack with the scraper, which cracked the ice so that you could peel it off the windshield in pieces instead of having to actually scrape it off. The hell of it is, I remember chipping out the corner, but for the life of me, I can't remember what to do next.

Does anyone use this technique, and if so, what am I forgetting?

Thanks.
It will work as long as the temp is close to 33(f). Or freezing rain with the ambient close to 32f.
I have needed to roll ASAP and had very heavy frost/ice. In those cases a pitcher of hot tap water cleared the ice nicely.
And there are additive for the washer for ice removal. If it isn't a strong enough mix it will frost over immediately, causing many rounds of washer cycles to get to the fire hall.
Best is parking in the garage, next is to cover windshield over with cardboard or something simular.
Also when the ice is heavy, the back of many scrapers is serrated, and can be used to groove the ice making scraping much easier. A hard frost on a -20(f) night like we are prepared for tonight makes for very hard scraping. Some times a scraper as Sharpe as a knife is all that will remove this hard frost short of a good warm-up.
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  #6  
Old 01-26-2009, 11:16 PM
GusNSpot GusNSpot is offline
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If there is any chance that I will have to use a vehicle that is not under cover, I put in a small electrical space heater, the $18.00 kind with 3 fan speeds and a Temp control set to keep the interior warm. (60 to 70) No ice or frost at all and it is warm to boot. On the 4X4 I also have an oil pan heater and if the battery is questionable I put a trickle charger on that. Cost of electricity, less than $2.00. Less than 30 times a year at most... here and I usually get by with 4-5 times a year.

Anyone who is silly enough to live North of 40 degrees North Latitude deserves all the problems they get.

YMMV
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  #7  
Old 01-26-2009, 11:27 PM
Enright3 Enright3 is offline
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Originally Posted by enipla View Post
And if you can, just pre-heat your car, get the defrosters working on it.
The most magical way is what you said above... get the defroster working on it. One you heat heat the windshield up, you form a thin layer of water between the windshield and the ice. Sometimes this can even enable you to 'slide' big chunks of ice off the windshield. If it's snow and ice, then you get the ice scraper and brush going.
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  #8  
Old 01-27-2009, 09:48 AM
SCSimmons SCSimmons is offline
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The news this morning was recommending to us non-ice-familiar Dallasites a mixture of water and vinegar as a de-icer. I have not tested this theory (never heard of it in 21 years living in Illinois and especially Michigan, where it certainly could have come in handy!), but I should get a chance to this afternoon.
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  #9  
Old 01-27-2009, 10:13 AM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Originally Posted by SCSimmons View Post
The news this morning was recommending to us non-ice-familiar Dallasites a mixture of water and vinegar as a de-icer.
Lovely idea - pour acid onto an expensive painted metal object. Let me know how that works out for you.
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  #10  
Old 01-27-2009, 10:24 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
PS CD cases (the clear plastic front part) work great as frost scrapers in the event you break your scraper. Just sayin'

I have discovered this myself and second the observation.
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  #11  
Old 01-27-2009, 11:47 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Around here (SE Louisiana), it almost never gets below 25 degrees F. Sometimes, when the temps fall below 35 F or so, we get a thinnish layer of ice on the windshield. I fill a gallon jug full of hot tap water (north of 160 F), run outside, and pour most of it over the icy windshield. The windshield has never cracked doing this, and the water only refreezes if I get interrupted and don't end up starting the car for a bit.

I imagine in colder climes, even that hot water would refreeze fairly quickly. I have noticed that people from truly cold areas never recommend using hot water this way. About how far down in temperature can hot water be safely used as a de-icer?
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  #12  
Old 01-27-2009, 11:51 AM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Uh, never. The problem isn't refreezing, it's that you're rapidly heating cold glass. Just because you haven't seen a problem yet doesn't mean one day you won't see your windshield crack or shatter.
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  #13  
Old 01-27-2009, 11:55 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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Originally Posted by GusNSpot View Post
Anyone who is silly enough to live North of 40 degrees North Latitude deserves all the problems they get.
Hey! My entire country is north of 40!
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  #14  
Old 01-27-2009, 11:57 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Moto View Post
Uh, never. The problem isn't refreezing, it's that you're rapidly heating cold glass. Just because you haven't seen a problem yet doesn't mean one day you won't see your windshield crack or shatter.
:shrug:

I don't think the glass actually gets hot, though. It's still quite cool to the touch after the ice is melted off. And again, I'm not doing it in -30 F weather, either.

EDIT: I missed that Gbro has tried this method successfully, as well. I am wondering if the true risk of windshield damage is lower than commonly thought?

Last edited by bordelond; 01-27-2009 at 11:59 AM..
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  #15  
Old 01-27-2009, 11:57 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by enipla View Post
Nothing beats a good scraper and brush. And if you can, just pre-heat your car, get the defrosters working on it.
Over here (Germany) we are always discouraged from running the engine or iddling, of the car while standing still (that's what you mean with pre-heating, yes?) for the two reasons: 1) It's bad for the enviroment, since the catalysator isn't heated up and doesn't work, also, because the engine isn't running optimally, more dangerous compounds are created (That's why police will give you a ticket for pollution if you iddle the engine)
2) it's bad for the engine, which is not designed to idle, but to run at high speeds. Esp. in winter, when oil is thickly viscous, this may damage the engine, when the oil can't get everywhere because the optimum (heat etc) of the engine is only reached during driving, not during standing.

Unless your car engines are designed differently?

The best way if you are a lantern-parker beforehand is to put one of those alufoil-covered blankets they sell at car shops on the windshield during the night, I'd think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gbro
I have needed to roll ASAP and had very heavy frost/ice. In those cases a pitcher of hot tap water cleared the ice nicely.
And there are additive for the washer for ice removal. If it isn't a strong enough mix it will frost over immediately, causing many rounds of washer cycles to get to the fire hall.
That surprises me, because I've heard (not a car expert myself) that that method - esp. with hot water instead of only room temp. - is a great way to crack your windshield due to the stresses of the temp. diff. between ice-cold windshield and hot water.
Also, unless you put additives into the water (Which are then dangerous for the enviroment) don't you run the risk of having a pure sheet of ice once the water cools down to ambient?
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Old 01-27-2009, 12:02 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
Also, unless you put additives into the water (Which are then dangerous for the enviroment) don't you run the risk of having a pure sheet of ice once the water cools down to ambient?
In extremely cold temperatures, perhaps.

I was talking about doing it in temps close to 0 Celsius. Sometimes, the "overnight" ice will still be there even when the morning air temp is around 2 or 3 C.
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  #17  
Old 01-27-2009, 12:10 PM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
1) It's bad for the enviroment, since the catalysator isn't heated up and doesn't work, also, because the engine isn't running optimally, more dangerous compounds are created (That's why police will give you a ticket for pollution if you iddle the engine)

2) it's bad for the engine, which is not designed to idle, but to run at high speeds. Esp. in winter, when oil is thickly viscous, this may damage the engine, when the oil can't get everywhere because the optimum (heat etc) of the engine is only reached during driving, not during standing.
I don't think either of those make any sense, but especially the latter. If your oil is viscous, you probably don't want to be running the engine fast until it thins out. A car will heat up to optimum temperatures just fine while idling. But if you use the right oil for the weather conditions, you don't have to idle the car to warm it up.

In my state, we have to do annual emission inspections which are typically done while the car is idling. I've seen the emission analysis and the pollutants coming out of the tailpipe are pretty minimal.

The real reason to not idle a car is that you're using up gas (or diesel) for no good purpose. However, "getting the defroster hot enough to get the ice off the windshield" counts as a good purpose, especially given that it's dangerous to go driving around with frost accumulating on the windshield.
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Old 01-27-2009, 12:34 PM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by Finagle View Post
I don't think either of those make any sense, but especially the latter. If your oil is viscous, you probably don't want to be running the engine fast until it thins out. A car will heat up to optimum temperatures just fine while idling. But if you use the right oil for the weather conditions, you don't have to idle the car to warm it up.
Sorry, I tried to remember what they said on TV several days ago why it's still not a good idea to idle the car while standing even for a few minutes, and they talked about the viscosity of the oil, and how while it would seem that running the engine = making the oil thin is wrong for idling while standing.

Quote:
In my state, we have to do annual emission inspections which are typically done while the car is idling. I've seen the emission analysis and the pollutants coming out of the tailpipe are pretty minimal.
I don't know who does your inspections - over here, it's the TÜV (technical control club), but they put the cars on rubber rollers (similar to that belt loop Dopers want to put airplanes on ) which the car moves against, so normal driving is simulated, not running the engine while standing still.

Quote:
The real reason to not idle a car is that you're using up gas (or diesel) for no good purpose. However, "getting the defroster hot enough to get the ice off the windshield" counts as a good purpose, especially given that it's dangerous to go driving around with frost accumulating on the windshield.
But you don't need to run the engine to get ice off! You use a bit of your muscle and the ice scraper! Like I said, if you idle your car for a few minutes, police will give you ticket, or your neighbours will treat you like the worst polluter on Earth because everybody knows you don't idle, yet we all manage to scrape off the ice from our windshields. (Because driving around with a frosted-over windshield and only a tiny peep-hole scraped free is dangerous and therefore, gets you a even more serious ticket.)
The warnings by police and car clubs start in November to get up 10 min. earlier than usual so you have enough time to scrape your car free, to scrape all windows (including sides) and brush snow off the roof (so there's no avalanche when you brake). And to get winter tires and drive according to conditions. Every year they tell people anew, so everybody should know it.
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Old 01-27-2009, 01:01 PM
Gbro Gbro is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
That surprises me, because I've heard (not a car expert myself) that that method - esp. with hot water instead of only room temp. - is a great way to crack your windshield due to the stresses of the temp. diff. between ice-cold windshield and hot water.
Also, unless you put additives into the water (Which are then dangerous for the enviroment) don't you run the risk of having a pure sheet of ice once the water cools down to ambient?
As posted, I have poured HOT tap water over my windshield many times over nearly 30 years of responding to the fire hall of ambulance garage. The layout of my home and garage made for a slower response so all those cold winters my 4X4 trucks would be parked outdoors and plugged in whenever the temps would be expected to go below 0(f). I always use a good synthetic oil and had a jug set out for hot tap water as I would head out the door.
When the hot water is applied the whippers are turned on as soon as they are freed up and although I never beliver I wouldn't at some point crack the glass I was told many years before that the window wouldn't and It just never has. Furthermore, i have had cracks in my window from road debris, and the hot water just didn't even increase these. And I am talking about cracks that can be pushed with the thumb and watch grow.
My question to you, Is safety glass like we have in USA autos the same as glass in your autos?
I know that years ago there were restrictions on cars brought into the US from abroad because of safety glass.
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  #20  
Old 01-27-2009, 01:03 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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:shrug:

There is no concern about tickets, neighbors or car theft where I live. And -20 f is not unusual. Idling to help clear the ice is one of the reasons I do it. Another is I want my cab to start to heat up before I drive.

I often have to scrape some as well and of course brush the snow off my car.
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Old 01-27-2009, 01:09 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by Gbro View Post
When the hot water is applied the whippers are turned on as soon as they are freed up and although I never beliver I wouldn't at some point crack the glass I was told many years before that the window wouldn't and It just never has. Furthermore, i have had cracks in my window from road debris, and the hot water just didn't even increase these. And I am talking about cracks that can be pushed with the thumb and watch grow.
Same here. Starting to think that "hot water cracks windshields" may be something of a UL. Maybe it was true in the 1950s but some kind of more advanced safety glass has eliminated the risk. Or else the conditions to bring about cracking have to be very specific.
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  #22  
Old 01-27-2009, 01:20 PM
An Arky An Arky is offline
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I cracked my windshield pouring lukewarm water on it last winter., and temps were only in the 20s, so it's no UL, though it may very well have been a windshield of inferior quality (I bought the car used).
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  #23  
Old 01-27-2009, 01:46 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Interesting thread on the Mythbusters forum about using hot tap water to clear ice off of windshields.

The responses are mixed, but there are many anecdotes of people using hot water safely for de-icing. There are also some opposing anecdotes. I wonder if it's a technique thing -- do it one specific way, and it's fine ... but do it in a trivially different way, and you'll crack the windshield for sure. Maybe year, make, and model of car matters, too -- perhaps not all windshield installations allow for the necessary "give". Or something.
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:25 PM
SCSimmons SCSimmons is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Moto View Post
Lovely idea - pour acid onto an expensive painted metal object. Let me know how that works out for you.
Well, (a) I don't think the pH of a 50/50 vinegar/water mixture is going to rapidly dissolve my car, and (b) if you'd seen my car, you would realize that if it did, this would be the least of its problems.
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  #25  
Old 01-27-2009, 02:43 PM
GusNSpot GusNSpot is offline
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Hot water poured slowly from the top and let trickle down slowly (relatively) compared to throwing a whole bucket of hot water over the whole windshield in one go might be the deciding factor + how tight the windshield is installed and how much room in that installation there is for dimensional change of the glass.

:: ask me why I think this? ::: I don't mind looking like an idiot.

Oh, and with boiling water on a windshield with only a thin layer of ice at -10 F I bet I can destroy any stock auto windshield. There is hot and then there is hot.

Last edited by GusNSpot; 01-27-2009 at 02:45 PM..
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  #26  
Old 01-27-2009, 02:48 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by GusNSpot View Post
Hot water poured slowly from the top and let trickle down slowly (relatively) compared to throwing a whole bucket of hot water over the whole windshield in one go might be the deciding factor + how tight the windshield is installed and how much room in that installation there is for dimensional change of the glass.

:: ask me why I think this? ::: I don't mind looking like an idiot.
You won't look like an idiot. Clearly, plenty of people use hot tap water for this purpose with no ill effect.
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  #27  
Old 01-27-2009, 02:53 PM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Originally Posted by SCSimmons View Post
Well, (a) I don't think the pH of a 50/50 vinegar/water mixture is going to rapidly dissolve my car, and (b) if you'd seen my car, you would realize that if it did, this would be the least of its problems.
Fact is it will pit both the paint and the windshield itself. But hey, like you said, it's your car.
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Old 01-27-2009, 03:00 PM
CC CC is offline
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For those Dopers who can avail themselves, I'd like to recommend one of the greatest inventions since the ballpoint pen: the remote starter. For the occasional environmental "cost" of running the car for ten minutes or so, we have the chance to go out to the car, quickly and effortlessly scrape the ice off all the windows, and sit down in a moderately warm car, with no impeded vision. When we're having -10 and -20 nights, such a cost is more than worth it. I had an aftermarket kit put on my wife's '01 Civic, and I've never spent money better.
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  #29  
Old 01-27-2009, 03:48 PM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
But you don't need to run the engine to get ice off! You use a bit of your muscle and the ice scraper! Like I said, if you idle your car for a few minutes, police will give you ticket, or your neighbours will treat you like the worst polluter on Earth because everybody knows you don't idle, yet we all manage to scrape off the ice from our windshields. (Because driving around with a frosted-over windshield and only a tiny peep-hole scraped free is dangerous and therefore, gets you a even more serious ticket.)

Your climate must be more kindly than ours. If it's cold enough, just the moisture from your breath is enough to cover the inside of the windshield with frost. Much safer to let the defroster get up to operating temperature before driving.
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Old 01-27-2009, 04:00 PM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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But don't put the defroster on high, right at first - I've cracked windshields from the inside doing that on subzero days.
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Old 01-27-2009, 05:10 PM
CC CC is offline
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I had an aftermarket kit put on my wife's '01 Civic, and I've never spent money better.
Which reminds me of the quip (that married men know too well) that free sex costs a lot more than the sex you pay for.
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Old 01-27-2009, 05:32 PM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Moto View Post
Fact is it will pit both the paint and the windshield itself. But hey, like you said, it's your car.
This is not likely. True, if you soaked your car in vinegar for a long time you would have problems, but acetic acid is volitile so it won't stick around. For the breif time that the acid will be in contact with your car, there will not likely be any problem.

Salt is much worse for your car and people drive in that all the time.
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  #33  
Old 01-27-2009, 05:52 PM
Linty Fresh Linty Fresh is offline
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Thanks for the input.

Now that you mention it, I seem to remember doing this after a sleet storm. Maybe the ice has to be a certain thickness.
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  #34  
Old 01-27-2009, 05:54 PM
PatriotGrrrl PatriotGrrrl is offline
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It's funny - stores sell a deicing chemical in a spray can, made just for this purpose, and it works WONDERFULLY!!! It's widely available, not expensive, and I would no sooner be without it than I would be without a scraper.

Yet I am apparently the only person on the internet who uses it.
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  #35  
Old 01-27-2009, 06:22 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by PatriotGrrrl View Post
It's funny - stores sell a deicing chemical in a spray can, made just for this purpose, and it works WONDERFULLY!!! It's widely available, not expensive, and I would no sooner be without it than I would be without a scraper.

Yet I am apparently the only person on the internet who uses it.
Ya know, I'm going to try some. I'm having shoulder surgery in 4 days and scraping the windows is going to be a real pain. That could really really help.
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  #36  
Old 01-27-2009, 06:39 PM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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Originally Posted by PatriotGrrrl View Post
It's funny - stores sell a deicing chemical in a spray can, made just for this purpose, and it works WONDERFULLY!!! It's widely available, not expensive, and I would no sooner be without it than I would be without a scraper.

Yet I am apparently the only person on the internet who uses it.

I came in here to mention just that. In really cold climates, like IL where I grew up, you'll freeze your ass off trying to scrape a thick layer off.

I wonder what its active ingredient is. Some of it is aerosol; I think Rain-X has one that's just a pump. Rubbing alcohol maybe?

BTW Rain-X also makes washer fluid with de-icer in it. Not that you'd use it to clear your windshield first thing in the morning, but if driving in freezing rain or something it could be advantageous.
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  #37  
Old 01-27-2009, 08:28 PM
PatriotGrrrl PatriotGrrrl is offline
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Mine (Prestone brand) says it contains methyl alcohol and ethylene gylcol.
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  #38  
Old 01-27-2009, 08:41 PM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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Originally Posted by PatriotGrrrl View Post
Mine (Prestone brand) says it contains methyl alcohol and ethylene gylcol.
Thanks for the info...I suspect you could make your own and save some money.

The methyl alcohol is prolly quite flammable...not the same as isopropyl, i.e. rubbing alcohol. Ethylene glycol is the main (?) ingredient in antifreeze. But of course they probably dilute the mixture, maybe to avoid harming the paint and/or to keep your car from going up in flames if you're smoking when applying it.
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  #39  
Old 01-27-2009, 08:46 PM
HongKongFooey HongKongFooey is offline
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Originally Posted by lobotomyboy63 View Post
Thanks for the info...I suspect you could make your own and save some money.

The methyl alcohol is prolly quite flammable...not the same as isopropyl, i.e. rubbing alcohol. Ethylene glycol is the main (?) ingredient in antifreeze. But of course they probably dilute the mixture, maybe to avoid harming the paint and/or to keep your car from going up in flames if you're smoking when applying it.
I've tried a mixture of two parts rubbing alcohol to one part water and it works well but not as good as the Prestone de-icer, especially below -20, YMMV.
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  #40  
Old 01-28-2009, 01:06 AM
Mudshark Mudshark is offline
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I don't have one of these, I just use a regular scraper, but they do make heated ice scrapers.
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  #41  
Old 01-28-2009, 05:51 AM
lobotomyboy63 lobotomyboy63 is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Here's a link to Rain-X

http://www.rainx.com/Products/Windsh...nt/2_In_1.aspx

Helps prevent and remove sleet, snow, ice, bugs, and road spray from sticking to glass

Wow, this stuff doesn't require buffing, which used to be the PITA about the product. Me lurves how rain beads away and you often don't even need the wipers. I think I still have some of the "old" stuff in the garage---I'll have to apply some today.
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  #42  
Old 01-28-2009, 08:26 AM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Location: The Nasty Nati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by constanze View Post

But you don't need to run the engine to get ice off! You use a bit of your muscle and the ice scraper! Like I said, if you idle your car for a few minutes, police will give you ticket, or your neighbours will treat you like the worst polluter on Earth because everybody knows you don't idle, yet we all manage to scrape off the ice from our windshields. (Because driving around with a frosted-over windshield and only a tiny peep-hole scraped free is dangerous and therefore, gets you a even more serious ticket.)

The warnings by police and car clubs start in November to get up 10 min. earlier than usual so you have enough time to scrape your car free, to scrape all windows (including sides) and brush snow off the roof (so there's no avalanche when you brake). And to get winter tires and drive according to conditions. Every year they tell people anew, so everybody should know it.

How humorously different in such a small way America and Germany are!
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  #43  
Old 01-28-2009, 10:49 AM
control-z control-z is online now
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One thing I've seen people do is put a blanket (as constanze mentioned) or even their floor mats over the windshield when snow or ice is forecasted.
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  #44  
Old 01-29-2009, 11:44 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finagle View Post
Your climate must be more kindly than ours. If it's cold enough, just the moisture from your breath is enough to cover the inside of the windshield with frost. Much safer to let the defroster get up to operating temperature before driving.
Huh? We recently had a wave of -20 C in North and Mid-Germany, and in Bavaria (close to the Mountains) -10 are usual during a normal winter. I didn't know Boston is that close to artic temps.
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  #45  
Old 01-29-2009, 12:00 PM
constanze constanze is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2006
okay, I looked at the ADAC website (the German AA; their experts and advice on cars is highly respected) and they say

Quote:
Die Unsitte scheint nicht ausrottbar: In der kalten Jahreszeit starten vereinzelte Zeitgenossen ganz gerne erstmal den Motor und machen sich dann daran, die Verglasung rundum mit dem Eiskratzer zu bearbeiten. Und das, obwohl sich eigentlich herumgesprochen haben müßte, dass das weder sinnvoll noch zulässig ist.
Rough translation
The wrong behaviour seems unkillable: in the cold season some individuals start their engine first and then start attacking the glas area with scrapers. Although it should be well-known that this is neither useful nor allowed.

Einheizen, aber richtig!

Bei Leerlaufdrehzahl dauert es reichlich, bis das erste laue Lüftchen aus der Fahrzeugheizung bläst. Beim Fahren, "unter Last", kommt die Motor -und damit auch Heizungstemperatur - dagegen vergleichsweise schnell auf Touren. Somit ist klar: Die Umwelt wird völlig sinnlos durch Abgase und Lärm belastet. Zudem wird überflüssiger weise Sprit - sprich "Geld" durch den Auspuff gejagt, und ein Knöllchen von 10 Euro droht ebenfalls

Heating, but done right: Running idle speed it takes a lot of time, till the first lukewarm breeze comes from the car's heater. But if you are driving, "under load", the engine - and with it the heater temp. - relativly quickly goes up to high revolutions. This makes it obvious: the enviroment is stressed completly needlessly with noise and emission. On top of that, gasoline - meaning money - is blown uselessly through the tailpipe, and a ticket of 10 Euros is also threatening.

Enteisungshilfen

Windschutzscheibe abends in Folie einpacken (dauert ein paar Sekunden) oder ein Enteisungsmittel (Pumpspray) verwenden. Mit dem bekommt man auch hartnäckige Eisschichten, die sich bei besonders ungünstigen Temperatur -und Luftfeuchteverhältnissen bilden können, schnell von Scheiben und Außenspiegeln - zur Not unter Mitwirkung des Eiskratzers.

De-icing tips: wrap windshield in foil in the evening (takes only a few seconds) or use a de-icing chemical (pump spray). With that you can also get rid quickly of obnoxious ice sheets, which form during unfavourable temp- and humidity conditions, on glas and mirrors, - if necessary with the aid of the ice scraper.

Nässe im Auto

Manchmal ist es lästig. Kurz nach dem Losfahren schlägt sich ein dünner Eisfilm innen an der Scheibe nieder. Das kann daran liegen, dass mit den Schuhen oder der Kleidung zuviel Nässe in den Innenraum transportiert wurde. Gummimattten sollten also immer wieder ausgeleert oder auch zusätzlich mit einer Lage Zeitungspapier unterlegt werden. Im feuchten Zustand wandern die dann wieder ins Altpapier. Auch die Klimaanlage sollte man im Fahrbetreib sporadisch zuschalten: sie verfügt grundsätzlich über eine Entfeuchtungs-Funktion.

Wetness inside the car: Sometimes it's a bother: Shortly after starting, a thin film of ice condenses on the windshield. That's because too much humitidy was transported inside with the shoes or clothes. So rubber mats should regularly be emptied, or if necessary, aided with a layer of newspapers. Those can be thrown into the paper recycling once they are wet. The air conditioner should also be turned on occasionally during the drive: it has a basic de-humidifying function.
Note to the Mods: I quoted a long part in order to translate the german text, I hope that's okay.
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  #46  
Old 01-29-2009, 12:27 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatriotGrrrl View Post
It's funny - stores sell a deicing chemical in a spray can, made just for this purpose, and it works WONDERFULLY!!! It's widely available, not expensive, and I would no sooner be without it than I would be without a scraper.

Yet I am apparently the only person on the internet who uses it.
I looked at that stuff and it said it has to be applied when the temperature is above 40. Since that won't happen until April or May, I guess I missed the window (pun intended).

Quote:
Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post

How humorously different in such a small way America and Germany are!
I'm saying...tickets for idling or not clearing off your windshield?? Don't your police have more serious issues to attend to?
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  #47  
Old 01-29-2009, 12:33 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Location: Flatlander in NH
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More on the de-icer spray:

<<The instructions say to start the car, then fire up your defrost (front and rear, I presume). While the car's warming up, you spray Rain-X De-Icer on the glass surfaces, including side windows, rear window and mirrors.

Results for me were unremarkable; so don't throw away your scraper just yet. The ice was typical Ottawa-style, which means thick. Side windows were as tough to clean as they always were. The windshield was easier, but don't forget, I had the defrost on full blast. Similarly, the rear window was no problem, but the defroster was working there, too. Mirrors were still tricky.

I suspect that if I left the car to warm up with the heater on, the ice would be easy to remove with or without Rain-X De-Icer. In which case a remote car starter might be a better idea. >>

bolding mine

http://www.canadiandriver.com/winter/rain-x.htm
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  #48  
Old 01-29-2009, 12:47 PM
constanze constanze is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
I'm saying...tickets for idling or not clearing off your windshield?? Don't your police have more serious issues to attend to?
Not clearing your windshield completly => Dangerous driving because you can't see all around. Dangerous drivers are stopped by the traffic police because that's their job.

Idling = polluting the enviroment, that needs to be stopped so selfish people learn it.

And it's the job of the police to stop all crimes, not concentrate on murders only and forget small stuff. But then, our murder rate is a bit lower than the US (one of those small differences...)
If the police started ranking crimes by importance instead of stopping all illegal behaviour, then they would interfere with the job of the lawmakers, who make laws for a reason. Since there is a good reason in most cases, only the selfish or dumb people need to be punished, the sensible ones see the reason and obey the laws.
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  #49  
Old 01-29-2009, 12:58 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Location: Colorado Rockies.
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Denver has an idling law. No more than 5 minutes.

Unless it’s less than 20 degrees.

I think a bigger concern over pollution is car theft. Since that’s not an issue for me, I’ll keep running my car for 15 minutes in the morning before I leave (in the winter).
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  #50  
Old 01-29-2009, 01:10 PM
maladroit maladroit is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2007
I prevented snow melting and freezing on my car one night while driving in the snow by turning off the heater and opening my window so the glass would get to outside temp before I reached my destination. I had already scraped ice off the windshield once that night and since it was still snowing I didn't want to do it twice. It worked, all I had to do was brush snow off the glass, no scraping. I felt so smart :P
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