The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-31-2009, 01:13 PM
Creaky Creaky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Constellations Over Colombia

I know there must be quite a few astronomy buffs on the Straight Dope Message Board.

I am requesting information about constellations seen in June and July over the Putumayo Department, Colombia SA. I know next to nothing about this subject.

I did a cursory Internet search (3hrs.) and the amount of information looks pretty slim. Plenty of Northern Hemisphere stuff but I can't seem to find Southern Hemi info.

Anyhow, I need this info fairly soon.

I'm stuck right now at my folks' house for at least the next week as we've had a death in the family. So that means no actual physical trips anywhere to do research.

Tough noogies; my deadline won't wait. Links would be helpful. Etc.

Thank you!
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 01-31-2009, 01:43 PM
Jenaroph Jenaroph is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
This page should let you input what you need.

http://www.fourmilab.ch/yoursky/

Putumayo is at about 1 N and 77 W.

I don't know if this page with the info I put in will display = http://www.fourmilab.ch/cgi-bin/Yoursky [edit- no, it doesn't.]

Basically, any constellation on the ecliptic or on the celestial equator will be right overhead when you're that close to Earth's equator.

Last edited by Jenaroph; 01-31-2009 at 01:44 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-31-2009, 02:02 PM
John DiFool John DiFool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Gotta check out Alpha Centauri, the nearby Eta Carinae nebula, and the Magellanic Clouds, just for starters (all of which should be visible after sunset this time of year). Saw them during a trip to Africa 8 years ago.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-31-2009, 02:09 PM
Creaky Creaky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Thank you.

Jenaroph, I bookmarked both of your links. It's all good; they both seem to work fine.


John DiFool, I copied and pasted your info to a Word file I've started on this subject.

Very much appreciate it, guys!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:00 PM
Mallory Mallory is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 67
There's also the Sky and Telescope Interactive Sky Chart: http://skychart.skytonight.com/obser...t/skychart.asp
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:28 PM
Creaky Creaky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Mallory, thank you.

I bookmarked that site as well.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:31 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
I Am the One Who Bans
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 78,236
Sending to GQ in case anyone there has more.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:33 PM
guizot guizot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 6,343
What is so special about the constellations over Putumayo? Can't they be seen from other places?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:41 PM
Creaky Creaky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot View Post
What is so special about the constellations over Putumayo? Can't they be seen from other places?
I'm looking for stuff in that general area. Maybe I should have said southwestern Colombia. That probably helps.

I didn't know if the closer you got to the Equator how much more specific I had to be about asking for locations. I didn't know if that made a difference or not in terms of what you could see. I really have no clue about astronomy.

Hope that clarifies things.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-31-2009, 09:09 PM
Ponch8 Ponch8 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,558
I'm not sure about Colombia in June, but when I was in Peru last May, I could see the Big Dipper and the Southern Cross at the same time. (Or at least in the amount of time it took me to turn my head in the opposite direction.)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-01-2009, 03:28 AM
Malacandra Malacandra is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creaky View Post
I'm looking for stuff in that general area. Maybe I should have said southwestern Colombia. That probably helps.

I didn't know if the closer you got to the Equator how much more specific I had to be about asking for locations. I didn't know if that made a difference or not in terms of what you could see. I really have no clue about astronomy.

Hope that clarifies things.

Thanks!
Just specifying the latitude would be enough - and, barring one or two close-to-the-Pole objects like Polaris or the Southern Cross (s Octantis is closer to being a southern Pole Star, but it's inconspicuous), a few degrees here or there is of no more moment than anywhere else in the world.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-01-2009, 06:48 AM
sailor sailor is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenaroph View Post
Basically, any constellation on the ecliptic or on the celestial equator will be right overhead when you're that close to Earth's equator.
You might want to reconsider or rephrase that. The celestial equator is inclined by 23.5 to the ecliptic plane.

Quote:
wikipedia
Celestial objects near the celestial equator are visible worldwide, but they culminate the highest in the sky in the tropics. The celestial equator passes through these constellations:Pisces , Cetus , Taurus , Eridanus , Orion , Monoceros , Canis Minor , Hydra , Sextans , Leo , Virgo , Serpens , Ophiuchus , Aquila , Aquarius
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-01-2009, 01:06 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 55,212
It'll also depend to a degree on what time of night you're looking. Usually, when you see a star chart for a particular month, it means shortly after sunset, since more people are awake then than midnight or the early morning. If you're going to be up later than that, you'll want to use a star chart that's one month later for every two hours later you're looking. Thus, for instance, if your star charts show 8:00 PM, and you're outside at 10:00 PM in June, you'll see something that looks like the 8:00 July chart.
__________________
Time travels in divers paces with divers persons.
--As You Like It, III:ii:328
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-03-2009, 10:55 AM
Creaky Creaky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Sorry to bump this. Right now it's easier than doing a bunch of private messages.

Thank you all very much for your info.

This has been quite helpful and it is appreciated.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.