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  #1  
Old 02-08-2009, 09:01 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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What dog breeds are naturally smellier/less smelly?

I know individuals vary all over the place, and since I'll be looking at shelter mutts anyway trying to tell what breed characteristics express themselves is kind of a crap shoot, but is it fair to say that "dog reek" is more common in certain breeds? For example, I've never met a Basset hound that smelled good. (I'm sure they smell well, but they sure don't smell good.) Are there certain groups of dogs with similar smell characteristics? I've only had Westies, and they just smell like regular dogs - no real smell when clean, doggy smell if they haven't had a bath in three months.
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  #2  
Old 02-08-2009, 09:09 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Hey Zsofia


I forwarded your question to my SO who is the head honchette with our Humane Society. Let's see what she says.

Meanwhile, what do the rest of our Doper dog-owner buddies think?

Maybe the smaller the breed the less the smell?

Depends on what you feed' em?

And they all smell bad when they get wet outside!

Good question!

Quasi
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Last edited by Quasimodem; 02-08-2009 at 09:10 PM..
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  #3  
Old 02-08-2009, 09:20 PM
erislover erislover is offline
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I've known many people with dogs, and invariably the stinky ones were the ones that were regularly bathed. Could dogs really be smellier by breed? Interesting.
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  #4  
Old 02-08-2009, 09:21 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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I can say from personal experience that dogs with oily coats ( i.e. some water dogs ) will start to stink to high heaven if you let them "go rancid." I had a Chesapeake Bay Retriever as a teen and he needed a dip in the ocean at least once a week.
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Old 02-08-2009, 09:40 PM
scr4 scr4 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quasimodem View Post
Maybe the smaller the breed the less the smell?
I don't think so. My Rat Terrier seemed to get smelly faster than my Collie did. (This was true when both were alive and lived in the same house, and bathed at the same frequency.)

It seems to me the short-haired breeds have more oily coat/skin and tend to smell worse.
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Old 02-08-2009, 09:43 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Not precisely what you asked for, but be aware that many mastiffs, such as St. Bernards, have the ability to projectile drool. A friend of mine had a St. Bernard who covered the walls of his house up to about 7 feet high with doggy drool. If you're concerned about odor, I'm guessing that would also be an issue for you.
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  #7  
Old 02-08-2009, 10:46 PM
SmartAleq SmartAleq is offline
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Malemutes smell like the wrath o'god if you don't keep them clean, especially in winter, especially if they're outdoor dogs. It's all that incredibly thick fur, just traps the stank like you wouldn't believe!

Of our two current dogs, the shorter haired lab/husky mix is less smelly than the longer, curly coated border collie cross with the kinda oily fur. The lab sheds water easier too, just comes right off him with a swipe of a towel. The other one needs to towelled off whenever he comes in out of the rain. Hence, longer haired dog = more wet dog stink. They both need baths at the moment...
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  #8  
Old 02-09-2009, 06:28 AM
Renee Renee is online now
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A lot of it is what you feed them. When we switched from kibble to homeade dog food, the doggy smell went away pretty much entirely. Now we bathe them when they're dirty, not stinky. But I think breed matters, too. The weimaraners we used to have got quite smelly (they smelled like doritos) after a week without a bath. Any breed that has skin folds (pugs, bulldogs, basset hounds, etc) can develop bacterial issues with the skin folds that cause odor. Also breeds with ear problems, like cocker spaniels. Ear infections reek.
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  #9  
Old 02-09-2009, 07:21 AM
ShibbOleth ShibbOleth is offline
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I don't recall our Basenji having much if any odor. Our current dog, some kind of chihuahua / terrier mix leaves a residual smell in the spots where she spends a lot of time, but doesn't have much smell on her body most of the time.
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  #10  
Old 02-09-2009, 08:02 AM
CrazyCatLady CrazyCatLady is offline
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Any of your hound breeds are going to reek. Bassetts, coon hounds, beagles, the lot of them. Stank-o-rama. It's the oil in their coats, which is a trait you'll find in a lot of other breeds that were originally water hunters like labs and spaniels. Also, oilier-coated dogs will leave marks on parts of your walls/door trim they rub against regularly if you don't keep 'em pretty damn clean. These wash off pretty easily unless you have textured walls, in which case you'll need a scrub brush and some elbow grease.

All breeds have their good points and their bad points. Pugs, for instance, tend not to smell or shed that much, but they're prone to joint issues, airway compromise, and their eyeballs falling out. Also, they fart. A lot. Dachshunds don't smell or shed or lose their eyeballs, but they're prone to back problems and they tend to be really dominant, which can turn into aggression if not dealt with properly. Labs keep their eyes and are smart and friendly, but they tend to smell a bit and shed and are prone to ear infections if you don't keep the ears cleaned out.

Personally, I'd rather deal with the bathing and ear cleaning needed for a lab than the wheezing and farting that comes with a pug, but we all draw the line in different places.
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  #11  
Old 02-09-2009, 09:40 AM
Neeps Neeps is offline
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Don't know if this helps, but both border collies I have had have both had a lovely smell about them. I swear their heads had a sort of perfume smell to them.

The retriever-collie cross that we have, though, inherited her coat from the retriever side, and gets progressively more smelly and oily the longer you leave her between baths.

You can guess which one gets to cuddle more. Poor stinky thing.
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  #12  
Old 02-09-2009, 09:44 AM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Yeah, I've noticed that labs often have that "wipe your hand on your pants" after you pet them going on.

And yes, aerial drool would certainly affect my adoption decision. I think that would be kind of obvious, though, while grooming at the shelter might be hit or miss.
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  #13  
Old 02-09-2009, 09:56 AM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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Eskies are amazingly easy to keep clean and have hardly any smell issues.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:26 AM
StGermain StGermain is online now
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CCL - I don't know - I had an Afghan hound and he didn't smell, despite that long coat.

My dobies don't tend to smell much, nor my standard poodle. The malamute is smelly, though. The English setter isn't too bad, but in part that's because he's lazy and doesn't go out as much as the other dogs. The newest dog, sort of a mini-wolfhound (60 lbs) doesn't smell yet, but she's been bathed pretty recently.

StG
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  #15  
Old 02-09-2009, 10:41 AM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Short-coated, non-swimming dogs would be my recommendation.

Also, you can sniff-test the shelter dogs you meet and form your own opinion, to some degree.
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  #16  
Old 02-09-2009, 10:52 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
Eskies are amazingly easy to keep clean and have hardly any smell issues.
Mine is virtually odorless regardless of how long he goes without a bath. His brother, who we had for a while as a puppy, was equally unsmelly. OTOH, he's an inside dog.
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  #17  
Old 02-09-2009, 11:06 AM
JKilez JKilez is online now
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I have never met a Husky that had a "doggy" smell. The breed seems immune to that problem (possibly lacking the skin oils or something). They will, however, pick up external odors due to their thick fur.

My Greyhound only has a minimal odor which will disappear for a week or so after she is bathed. If she was washed regularly, it probably would never be noticed.
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  #18  
Old 02-09-2009, 11:26 AM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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It's very weird, but I have a basenji mix that does not smell "doggy" at all. He is the nicest smelling animal I've ever smelled, he literally always naturally smells like he's just been dryer-tumbled. Even when wet from the rain, he doesn't smell like "wet dog" either.
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  #19  
Old 02-09-2009, 11:26 AM
Lanzy Lanzy is offline
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Maybe its what I feed them, Bill-Jac, but my dogs hardly ever smell badly. Of course every now and then they roll around on a dead lizard and make themselves stinky, but by and large they are very clean and keep themselves that way for the most part. They get a really good bath once a month.

Oh yeah, 7 Jack russels.
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  #20  
Old 02-09-2009, 12:09 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
Mine is virtually odorless regardless of how long he goes without a bath. His brother, who we had for a while as a puppy, was equally unsmelly. OTOH, he's an inside dog.
Cherish that critter, Really. I miss mine so much.
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  #21  
Old 02-09-2009, 12:18 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
Cherish that critter, Really. I miss mine so much.
I don't see him very much- he had to stay behind when I went to college (no dogs in dorms), and by the time I moved into apartments he was more into my mother than he was into me.

He's an awesome dog, though. Also, incredibly effective for picking up women.
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  #22  
Old 02-09-2009, 01:42 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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The "Head Honchette" says any hound (including the Bassett) have the worst smells, but I'm going to also go with the poster who says that the heavy-coated dogs also do have that "auro of reek" about them.

My Belgian Tervurens weren't as heavy coated as a Malamute or Husky, but yeah, I remember the smell.

Q
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  #23  
Old 02-09-2009, 01:53 PM
It's Not Rocket Surgery! It's Not Rocket Surgery! is offline
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Our 2 Boston Terriers don't have that dog smell at all. However, they make up for it in flatulence!
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  #24  
Old 02-09-2009, 01:55 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Well, hell, I make up for it in flatulence. What good is a dog if you can't blame it when you fart?
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