The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-21-2009, 05:37 AM
Micky the Maven Micky the Maven is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 10
Are There Any Appetite Suppressants That Actually Work?

The title pretty much says it all: Are there any appetite suppressants that actually work.
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 02-21-2009, 06:25 AM
astro astro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
See

Any really effective OTC appetite suppressants?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-21-2009, 10:32 AM
Marconi & Schmeese Marconi & Schmeese is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2002
Yes, but mine is prescription and is prescribed for ADHD. Vyvanse, if you are interested.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-21-2009, 10:39 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Just eat stuff with less calories. I used to eat junk food and now I eat fuits and veggies. Lost 30 lbs. easily.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-21-2009, 12:16 PM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Southern Pennsylvania
Posts: 21,601
Well, not that this will help, but opiates can be a strong appetite suppressant. Last summer after recovering from surgery I had no appetite nor even a desire to eat. I wouldn't even eat the things I would normally have to keep myself from eating.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-21-2009, 12:27 PM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post
Well, not that this will help, but opiates can be a strong appetite suppressant. Last summer after recovering from surgery I had no appetite nor even a desire to eat. I wouldn't even eat the things I would normally have to keep myself from eating.
And some of the more "recreational" drugs certainly work well too.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-21-2009, 12:28 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2003
Cigarettes.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-21-2009, 03:09 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
The drug Qnexa, which is a combination of low doses of phentermine and topamax is entering stage III clinical trials. It seems fairly effective, and works better than either drug alone.

http://www.drugs.com/clinical_trials...ease-2213.html

However it is a mix of prescription medications, and phentermine is a scheduled drug.

Last edited by Wesley Clark; 02-21-2009 at 03:10 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-21-2009, 03:42 PM
KnitWit KnitWit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: I'm now an Iowenie!
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wesley Clark View Post
The drug Qnexa, which is a combination of low doses of phentermine and topamax is entering stage III clinical trials. It seems fairly effective, and works better than either drug alone.

http://www.drugs.com/clinical_trials...ease-2213.html

However it is a mix of prescription medications, and phentermine is a scheduled drug.
I lost 80 pounds on phentermine. I was insane the entire time I took it. I was unable to either eat or sleep. It basically made me hysterical. Ack...horrible stuff.

I've also taken Topomax for psych reasons. It does, indeed kill your appetite. It also kills your brain. My therapist at the time referred to it as "dope-a-max." I got lost on my way home from work once while taking the stuff. Had massive "word finding" problems. Again, I say, ack!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-21-2009, 04:16 PM
Stathol Stathol is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Well, in the broadest context -- yes. Amphetamines of pretty much any kind are known to act as appetite suppressants. This probably has something to do with how they increase one or more key neurotransmitters - serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. In fact, some of the older commercial diet pills contained various and sundry amphetamines before the FDA had them classified as Schedule [Whatever] drugs. This is primarily why meth-heads always look so emaciated.

Increasing these neurotransmitters is not necessarily a good thing. Increasing dopamine levels plays a significant role in why amphetamines are addictive. Because it is a stress hormone as well as a neurotransmitter (and closely related to epinephrine, a.k.a. adrenaline), increasing norepinepherine can cause tachycardia (increased heart rate) and hypertension (increased blood pressure), both of which are definitely bad for you, especially if you're overweight to begin with.

Prescription drugs prescribed for ADD/ADHD are frequently either amphetamines or closely chemically related to them. Adderall (a mixture of 4 different amphetamines) is probably the most well-known of them in this context, and has a history of abuse by anorexics.

Some of the drugs which are chemically similar to amphetamines may share some degree of their appetite suppression characteristics. This includes things like psuedoephedrine (sudafed), Ritalin (methylphenidate), and some of the compounds used in various "energy drinks".

Long story short, yes there are drugs which are effective appetite suppressants, but most of them are either illegal or prescription drugs. Those that are available by prescription aren't prescribed for that purpose because of their other risks. I'm not aware of any effective appetite suppressants that don't have potentially dangerous side-effects, but then I've never really looked for one.

On the chance that the OP is asking this because he/she is looking for such a drug...I apologize for sounding preachy, but I'd strongly advise against it. The potential risks to your health don't outweigh the benefits, especially not when you consider that most of these drugs exacerbate the health problems caused by obesity. If it was just a curious question, then just ignore me :P
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-21-2009, 05:21 PM
Green Cymbeline Green Cymbeline is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnitWit View Post
I lost 80 pounds on phentermine. I was insane the entire time I took it. I was unable to either eat or sleep. It basically made me hysterical. Ack...horrible stuff.
Likewise, I list 60 pounds on phentermine. It made me feel really "speedy," for lack of a better word. And falling asleep was difficult. I suppose the side effects were worth it because I really needed help losing the weight. But yes, the side effects were pretty annoying.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-21-2009, 06:02 PM
Moirai Moirai is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Cigarettes, cocaine, methamphetamine, caffeine... yeah, I can think of a bunch.

Cocaine always worked best for me.

Last edited by Moirai; 02-21-2009 at 06:02 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-21-2009, 06:05 PM
Moirai Moirai is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Also, when I cut down on carbs or cut them out all together (no bread, rice, pasta, etc) and eat protein and veggies, I find after the first few days that I am MUCH less hungry and eat less. Probably due to the slower metabolism rate of the protein vs. the fast rate of metabolising carbs/sugars, or so I've been told.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-21-2009, 10:15 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Behind the rabbit
Posts: 17,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marconi & Schmeese View Post
Yes, but mine is prescription and is prescribed for ADHD. Vyvanse, if you are interested.
It's interesting how these drugs affect people differently. Amphetamines are used in the same way, and if you're don't have ADHD they make you essentially a speed freak, but if you do have it, they help you focus and appear to calm you down. If Wikipedia was still accurate the last time I looked this up, they also prescribe it for some cases of morbid obesity, and that is also a remaining on-label use for methamphetamine, under the name Desoxyn, as well.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-21-2009, 11:01 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnitWit View Post
I lost 80 pounds on phentermine. I was insane the entire time I took it. I was unable to either eat or sleep. It basically made me hysterical. Ack...horrible stuff.

I've also taken Topomax for psych reasons. It does, indeed kill your appetite. It also kills your brain. My therapist at the time referred to it as "dope-a-max." I got lost on my way home from work once while taking the stuff. Had massive "word finding" problems. Again, I say, ack!
What doses were you and nyctea scandiaca taking? Qnexa is 15mg phentermine and 92mg topamax. Taking half the dose (7.5mg/46mg) is roughly as effective as the full dose.

http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/tic...211&id=9443308

"Subjects treated with full-dose and mid-dose Qnexa had an average weight loss of 9.2% and 8.5% respectively, as compared to weight loss of 1.7% reported in the placebo group (ITT LOCF p<0.0001). Average weight loss was 19.8 pounds and 18.2 pounds in the treatment arms as compared to 3.3 pounds in the placebo group."
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-22-2009, 04:31 AM
Busy Scissors Busy Scissors is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Just for interest - There were high hopes for acomplia when it was launched as a slimming drug a few years ago - people thought it could be the biggest blockbuster in history. It blocks a cannabanoid receptor in your brain involved in appetite / reward feelings - it was thought it could be effective for more than just appetite suppression, any addictive behaviour was up for being modulated by the drug, with smoking being target #1.

Unfortunately, the CB receptor proved too difficult a target to manipulate safely. The drug failed to get approval in the US right out of the blocks, but was approved in Europe. Psychiatric disorders ensued, with a higher rate of suicide being observed in people taking acomplia, leading to the drug being completely withdrawn late last year.

It looks like the problem is mechanism-based, rather than compound-based. As a result, all other pharma companies who had CB1 anatagonists in the pipeline have had to suspend work on them, and it's back to the drawing board for an anti-obesity drug that works on the CNS.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-03-2009, 12:23 PM
Bamboo Boy Bamboo Boy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
I would suggest trying psyllium husk. I drink it everyday for the fiber content...Things come out really nice. However, I noticed, and so have friends who take it, a marked decrease in hunger for a good 3-4 hours after drinking the psyllium husk. Wiki it if you've never heard of it!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-03-2009, 12:36 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
I believe I asked a long time ago if there didn't exist an appetite suppressant that wasn't also, essentially, speed. It'd be nice if they could separate the two effects. I'd just like to kill my grizzly bear-like appetite, not flip out on amphetamines!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-03-2009, 02:29 PM
Bamboo Boy Bamboo Boy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
I just want to add that psyllium husk, unlike most of the suggestions in this thread is a beneficial thing for you.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-03-2009, 04:44 PM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 17,695
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamboo Boy View Post
I just want to add that psyllium husk, unlike most of the suggestions in this thread is a beneficial thing for you.
Is it? Was your digestive tract not clearing itself before you starting taking it?
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-03-2009, 05:44 PM
Qwisp Qwisp is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere boring
Posts: 1,084
Is there any truth to Hoodia being an appetite suppressant?
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-03-2009, 06:41 PM
Bamboo Boy Bamboo Boy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
Is it? Was your digestive tract not clearing itself before you starting taking it?
Yes it was- are you implying that the only way one can benefit from this product is to have your tract not clearing itself? I'm thinking more in terms of quality-

But yeah, it was, I guess, but not as efficiently and effortlessly as when I drink the psyllium husk. It's like clockwork and very very....how to put it delicately? It almost makes toilet paper obsolete.

But this thread was about appetite suppressants, and I do think it works for that, which is a perfectly fine side effect for me. I'm skinny but pigout recreationally sometimes.

And wether or not your digestive tract is clearing itself or not, I'm confident it is less damaging than most of the suggestions here (though I think some are tongue in cheek)
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-03-2009, 10:35 PM
KnitWit KnitWit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: I'm now an Iowenie!
Posts: 410
Really, the thing is that if there were appetite supressants (read "weight loss drugs") that worked there wouldn't be any fat people. They all fail for various reasons. Side effects, the fact that they wear off, etc. If anyone tells you they can sell you a magic pill that will make you not want to eat, go check out Quackwatch before taking it.

That said, there are things, such as prescription Phentermine, that will kill your appetite and maybe give you a temporary advantage. If you're ten pounds overweight, that might be all you need to get on track to being healthyl But one of the things that some people don't consider is that you may not really be eating because you're HUNGRY. Does that make any sense? I was formerly morbidly obese. I didn't eat myself into oblivion because my body was crying out for the amount of calories in an entire bag of Oreos. Shutting off my appetite for a time with medication resulted in weight loss.

But the fact is that the Blue Cross, Blue Shield research shows that people who get above a certain BMI (can't remember exactly what it is right now) who lose a significant amount of weight and keep it off is ONE PERCENT. This is why they pay for weight loss surgery, which has a higher success rate than that, at least.

Things that are appetite supressants that don't require OTC drugs or prescriptions:

1. Exercise
2. A high fiber diet (which is why taking psycillium helps).
3. A normal body image.
4. A "normal" relationship with food.

Number 4 is tough. If food is one of the only pleasures in your life, if food is comfort for you, if you eat from boredom, stress, or self-loathing nothing is going to "suppress" that.

And a realistic body image is key too, for reasons I will never understand. You must like yourself enough that you care to take good care of yourself.

You can't take a pill to give you that luxury.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-03-2009, 10:50 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Only somewhat related.

A guy I know this weekend told me how he kept his wieght down years ago.

He only ate things he didnt like.

Sounds brutal, but I imagine it would work...
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-04-2009, 12:23 AM
chorpler chorpler is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Vegas, baby!
Posts: 3,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post
Well, not that this will help, but opiates can be a strong appetite suppressant. Last summer after recovering from surgery I had no appetite nor even a desire to eat. I wouldn't even eat the things I would normally have to keep myself from eating.
But they can also have the opposite effect, often making the opiate user crave sweet food.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-04-2009, 02:55 AM
neutron star neutron star is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorpler View Post
But they can also have the opposite effect, often making the opiate user crave sweet food.
I can definitely attest to this. Opiates and ice cream are a match made in heaven.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-04-2009, 05:04 AM
KnitWit KnitWit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: I'm now an Iowenie!
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by neutron star View Post
I can definitely attest to this. Opiates and ice cream are a match made in heaven.
In addition, I don't eat when I drink alcohol. So while it's not an appetite suppressant, there is no end to the way you can abuse your body so that you stop eating and lose weight.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-04-2009, 07:15 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Southern Pennsylvania
Posts: 21,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorpler View Post
But they can also have the opposite effect, often making the opiate user crave sweet food.
Interesting. Absolutely did not have this. In fact, the day I came home from the hospital we stopped to pick up food and I overloaded on the sweets. I still have several quarts of Ice Cream in the freezer from that day. Humans are interesting - everyone's different, eh?
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 03-04-2009, 10:06 AM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 17,695
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamboo Boy View Post
Yes it was- are you implying that the only way one can benefit from this product is to have your tract not clearing itself? I'm thinking more in terms of quality-
I was just making the point that unless your GI tract truly isn't working, it's not "beneficial", it's at most neutral. It's like saying products to clean out toxins are beneficial when you have a perfectly good system for cleaning your body already. Plus laxatives are abused by folks with eating disorders so there's a harmful potential there.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 03-04-2009, 10:10 AM
ClintPhoenix ClintPhoenix is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
I was taking amphetamines for a while for ADD - dexadrine - and the interesting thing that I found is that while it definitely did suppress my appetite, I found that I was still eating out of habit at the normal times despite any feeling of hunger. It also didn't really affect the amount that I could eat - but again, my portion size was just out of habit. After a while, I noticed that I was sometimes forgetting to eat meals because I wasn't really hungry, and was reducing my portion size, but habit was still guiding me for quite a while.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 03-04-2009, 10:11 AM
KnitWit KnitWit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: I'm now an Iowenie!
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
I was just making the point that unless your GI tract truly isn't working, it's not "beneficial", it's at most neutral. It's like saying products to clean out toxins are beneficial when you have a perfectly good system for cleaning your body already. Plus laxatives are abused by folks with eating disorders so there's a harmful potential there.
I concur. Fiber is great. Taking tons of it to rid yourself of calories you consumed...not such a great idea.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 03-04-2009, 10:27 AM
ianzin ianzin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Near London, UK.
Posts: 4,186
Very good post from KnitWit.

There's a drink that you can easily make yourself and is known by many names: take a mug of boiling water, add 1-2 teaspoons of lemon juice, 1-2 teaspoons of maple syrup and add a pinch of red cayenne pepper. Drink this, and you don't feel hungry for a while afterwards. Whether it really works, or whether it's just ritual magic and placebo, I don't know, but I do find it effective. And I quite like the drink, too.

However, I think suggestions along these lines should never be allowed to obscure the basic wisdom as presented by KnitWit and others. Trying to suppress your appetite is not a good or advisable strategy - the appetite 'mechanism' is there for a reason, built in by a gazillion years of evolution, and very closely wired to your surviva instincts. The far smarter strategy is to achieve a better relationship with food so that you eat what's good and healthy and nutritious because you want to, and don't each much else because you don't want to. Your appetite 'instinct' will then work with you and not lead to any problems.

Of course, this is easier said than done for many people.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 03-04-2009, 12:04 PM
Max Torque Max Torque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Raiderville, TX
Posts: 9,578
Quote:
Originally Posted by billfish678 View Post
Only somewhat related.

A guy I know this weekend told me how he kept his wieght down years ago.

He only ate things he didnt like.

Sounds brutal, but I imagine it would work...
heh. That worked for me for about a year. I had to get myself into the mindset that "this is for fuel, not for pleasure" at every meal. Worked well for that year, but eventually, you wanna eat something that tastes good again.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 03-04-2009, 12:36 PM
gurujulp gurujulp is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 1,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClintPhoenix View Post
I was taking amphetamines for a while for ADD - dexadrine - and the interesting thing that I found is that while it definitely did suppress my appetite, I found that I was still eating out of habit at the normal times despite any feeling of hunger. It also didn't really affect the amount that I could eat - but again, my portion size was just out of habit. After a while, I noticed that I was sometimes forgetting to eat meals because I wasn't really hungry, and was reducing my portion size, but habit was still guiding me for quite a while.
This. I have experimented with several 'appetite supressants' over the years, whether for self-medication, recreation, or prescribed for weight loss. It works, but only if you are still paying close attention. Habit is a bitch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Torque View Post
heh. That worked for me for about a year. I had to get myself into the mindset that "this is for fuel, not for pleasure" at every meal. Worked well for that year, but eventually, you wanna eat something that tastes good again.
I did something a bit like this. It was a smell thing for me. I would smell something I really liked that was bad for me (like pizza), and I would recite a litany of disgust inside my head.

"OMG that smells so disgusting-

I can smell the fat and nastiness-

It is making me nauseated"

And then I would slam a whole lot of ice water. The ice water on an empty stomach would make me feel ill, and so eventually I programmed myself into actually disliking certain smells, and by extention, the associated foods.

This is actually the only way I was able to keep weight off for any length of time without a serious cardio program. Did it for years, but then something clicked back, and it didn't work anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 03-04-2009, 12:53 PM
KnitWit KnitWit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: I'm now an Iowenie!
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by gurujulp View Post

I did something a bit like this. It was a smell thing for me. I would smell something I really liked that was bad for me (like pizza), and I would recite a litany of disgust inside my head.

"OMG that smells so disgusting-

I can smell the fat and nastiness-

It is making me nauseated"
Considering/remembering that some things are basically poison is a GREAT idea and helps a lot!
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 03-04-2009, 12:55 PM
Bamboo Boy Bamboo Boy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
I was just making the point that unless your GI tract truly isn't working, it's not "beneficial", it's at most neutral. It's like saying products to clean out toxins are beneficial when you have a perfectly good system for cleaning your body already. Plus laxatives are abused by folks with eating disorders so there's a harmful potential there.

I don't think psyllium husk is considered a proper laxative, is it? I could be wrong.

My GI tract was clearly working I was processing my food and passing it, etc. But not as easily or 'completely' as I do now. I feel wonderful after a BM now (like running around the block for fun, I feel 'light') when I just felt vaguely relieved and depressurized before. This lifts my spirits, and...I just feel better. Is this not beneficial? I FEEL better. This borders now an a philosophical argument about what 'beneficial' means, I suppose.

I'm not claiming it cleans 'toxins' out of the body or anything like that, BTW.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 03-04-2009, 12:56 PM
Bamboo Boy Bamboo Boy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnitWit View Post
I concur. Fiber is great. Taking tons of it to rid yourself of calories you consumed...not such a great idea.
I don't know that anyone is suggesting that, I'm certainly not.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 03-04-2009, 01:01 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamboo Boy View Post
. I feel wonderful after a BM now (like running around the block for fun, I feel 'light') when I just felt vaguely relieved and depressurized before. This lifts my spirits, and...I just feel better.

Gawd,

If a good BM becomes the highlight of my day just shoot me

Though this does explain both why my old dog gets so perky after a visit to the back yard and the behaviour of some of my professors...
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 03-04-2009, 01:51 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Torque View Post
heh. That worked for me for about a year. I had to get myself into the mindset that "this is for fuel, not for pleasure" at every meal. Worked well for that year, but eventually, you wanna eat something that tastes good again.
Another way is to get "sick" on something.

I got a bad batch of sweet tea one time. I don't know what the hell was done to that tea, but it was YEARS before I even vaguely wanted tea again and I am a die hard tea lover.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 03-04-2009, 02:27 PM
KnitWit KnitWit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: I'm now an Iowenie!
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by billfish678 View Post
Another way is to get "sick" on something.

I got a bad batch of sweet tea one time. I don't know what the hell was done to that tea, but it was YEARS before I even vaguely wanted tea again and I am a die hard tea lover.


My sister ended up with C-diff after being prescribed antibiotics for a massive diahrrea problem. Basically, the antibiotics killed off all the "good" bacteria in her gut, leaving the meanies to take over.

This might SOUND like a great diet plan, but she was suicidal over it at one point. She has such a difficult time keeping weight ON on top of the fact that for about a year and a half she couldn't go ANYWHERE unless she knew she could safely be in the bathroom for an hour and a half and not miss anything.

So, there's another answer! C-cif (which stands for colostrus dificil or something like that). There are tons of such conditions that will cause weight loss. At 5'5"my sis ws down to 85 pounds and now had damage to hear heart and liver.

The more I hear myself chat about this, the more I think it's a terrific idea to take advantage of the natual appetite suppressants your body already has.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.