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  #1  
Old 03-27-2009, 11:08 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Do Fedex And UPS Hold Off Delivering Things?

I ordered two things online, and both had free shipping IF you took the slowest delivery method. Since I'm in no hurry to get them, I decided to save myself the combined $30.00 and get it free.

One was sent FedEx and the other was sent UPS. I noticed the FedEx was sent and had an estimated shipping day of Monday March 30th. In one day it went from California to Chicago. And now has appeared to be sitting in Chicago. So it'll be a total of six days if it's delivered on Monday.

Now yesterday I ordered something via UPS and it says Friday April 4th. The tracking order indicates it went from Portland, OR to Chicago in one day. Now it appears to be in Chicago.

Now I'm not complaining but I'm curious. Do FedEx, UPS and others, just let the package sit and then not them out till the scheduled delivery day? I can see why they'd do this. If they were too fast no one would pay extra for the speedy delivery.

I could also understand it'd make it easier for them to schedule drivers. Make two trips instead of one. But like if my neighbor ordered something via FedEx and my package, which is sitting in Chicago (let's say for argument sake they are at the same place), would they take both packages and save a trip?

So does anyone know how they do this?
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2009, 12:17 AM
Rhubarb Rhubarb is offline
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IME, neither carrier has any trouble filling their trucks with items that HAVE to be delivered that day. So any package that doesn't need to go on a truck for that day's run will sit on the shelf until they are required to make room for it. And even if they were making another delivery to your house, say an overnight package, the GroundSaver package wouldn't go on the truck until the scheduled delivery date. In rare instances where the delivery location was remote or spare capacity existed on the delivery truck, they MIGHT send a package out early.
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  #3  
Old 03-28-2009, 06:42 AM
rbroome rbroome is online now
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Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
I ordered two things online, and both had free shipping IF you took the slowest delivery method. Since I'm in no hurry to get them, I decided to save myself the combined $30.00 and get it free.

One was sent FedEx and the other was sent UPS. I noticed the FedEx was sent and had an estimated shipping day of Monday March 30th. In one day it went from California to Chicago. And now has appeared to be sitting in Chicago. So it'll be a total of six days if it's delivered on Monday.

Now yesterday I ordered something via UPS and it says Friday April 4th. The tracking order indicates it went from Portland, OR to Chicago in one day. Now it appears to be in Chicago.

Now I'm not complaining but I'm curious. Do FedEx, UPS and others, just let the package sit and then not them out till the scheduled delivery day? I can see why they'd do this. If they were too fast no one would pay extra for the speedy delivery.

I could also understand it'd make it easier for them to schedule drivers. Make two trips instead of one. But like if my neighbor ordered something via FedEx and my package, which is sitting in Chicago (let's say for argument sake they are at the same place), would they take both packages and save a trip?

So does anyone know how they do this?
I haven't kept records, but I have grown to assume that 5 day ground shipping takes 3 days. I would be surprised if a ground package took the full time. And remember, the "free" delivery isn't free to the shipper so UPS is making money every time. And there are costs to holding packages in terms of storage, scheduling, etc. I doubt they bother holding up the ground shipments.
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Old 03-28-2009, 07:03 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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My experience has been that sometimes the "slow delivery" package will arrive before the "due date". I can only assume that if there's room on the truck they'll deliver it, but such things are the last items loaded until the must deliver date, and are only sent early if there's room to ship them.
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  #5  
Old 03-28-2009, 11:12 AM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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I'm having the exact same situation occur. The "delivery date" is March 31, but the package left Leeds, PA (its third stop) two days ago. Leeds is two hours from here. It has yet to arrive at the local Fed Ex facilty, nor to be delivered. so they are obviously holding it somewhere until the 31st.
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  #6  
Old 03-28-2009, 11:17 AM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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Leetsdale, PA. Duh.
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  #7  
Old 03-28-2009, 12:33 PM
scr4 scr4 is offline
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I've seen a package marked as "not due for delivery" on the FedEx tracking info. The package didn't get on the delivery truck even though it arrived at the local office the night before. It's very rare though.
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  #8  
Old 03-28-2009, 08:50 PM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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My package arrived this afternoon, a full three days ahead of the estimated delivery, and on a Saturday, yet!..but even though it was shipped FedEx, it was delivered by USPS...so I guess they didn't want to store it for a few days.
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  #9  
Old 03-28-2009, 09:37 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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I sent an XBOX 360 to get repaired and according to UPS the repair center told them to hold it for an extra day. It was in the repair center town on Monday but didn't get delivered until Tues because of that request.

Last edited by Bijou Drains; 03-28-2009 at 09:37 PM..
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  #10  
Old 03-28-2009, 10:52 PM
Green Bean Green Bean is offline
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Anecdotes don't equal data.

I'm sorry I don't have a cite for this, but as far as I know, UPS will deliver packages as soon as they can. Why? They want to get rid of them!

The longer a package stays in their system, the more it costs them, in terms of warehouse space, handling costs, and liability risk.

If they can reduce the amount of packages in their system by, say, 5% just by moving things along as expeditiously as possible, that's 5% less warehouse space they need to pay for and maintain. With a system as big as UPS's, that's huge. And extra packages sitting in the warehouse cost extra man-hours. How can a package just sitting on a shelf cost time? Ever tried to find something in a crowded warehouse? Ever try to find a space to put something new in a crowded warehouse? It just plain takes less time and effort if the warehouse is a little less crowded. And it's less likely you'll damage something by shifting it around if you have a little more space. Which brings us to liability costs--the longer it's in UPS's possession, the more likely it is to get damaged.

So it's entirely in UPS's best interest to move things along and get them delivered as soon as they can. Since they are mainly using excess transport capacity, it costs them little or nothing extra to do this. It saves them money and it pleases the customer. There is no reason at all for them to routinely delay packages.

As for the argument that people won't pay for the fast service because the regular service is too fast? Unlikely. It's pretty hard for a business to go wrong underpromising and overdelivering. The amount of revenue lost by people choosing regular shipping because they think it will be fast enough will be more than offset by the people who choose UPS because they get their packages "early." And that person who thinks regular shipping will be fast enough? Well, they'll be trained out of it the first time something ends up arriving on the actual expected delivery date. Next time, they'll cough up.
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  #11  
Old 03-28-2009, 10:56 PM
dzeiger dzeiger is offline
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Originally Posted by kittenblue View Post
My package arrived this afternoon, a full three days ahead of the estimated delivery, and on a Saturday, yet!..but even though it was shipped FedEx, it was delivered by USPS...so I guess they didn't want to store it for a few days.
That is probably FedEx Smartpost http://fedex.com/us/smartpost/approa...ss.html?link=4.

Essentially it's a matter of waiting until they have enough packages going in the right general direction, then bundle them together and ship them out. Repeat until your package gets to the right city, at which point it's handed to USPS for final delivery.
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2009, 11:42 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
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Moving from "California" to Chicago in a day meant it moved space-A on a plane. Chicago is a busy city for freight so it will likely be trucked from there to another sorting facility. The freight is already bundled with similar delivery dated freight and will get bumped if the lanes are full until the due date is the next day.

Business is way down for both Fed Ex and UPS so load utilization will be tightened which means low yield routes will be combined with other routes or eliminated.
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  #13  
Old 03-28-2009, 11:49 PM
Deeg Deeg is offline
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Green Bean gave the main reason I believe the shippers don't purposefully delay packages. Another reason is competition--if FedEx purposefully delayed packages but UPS didn't, UPS would get more business. Packages will be delayed only if it's more efficient for them to be delayed.
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  #14  
Old 03-29-2009, 06:34 AM
kanicbird kanicbird is offline
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My WAG is that the low priority stuff is used to top off the truck after all the high -P stuff is added, as the truck should leave full. The estimate in time they give may be the time it should take to go through all the low -P stuff to deliver that package given normal flow of high -P.
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  #15  
Old 03-29-2009, 10:35 AM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is online now
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I've never worked for FedEx or UPS, but my airline used to haul lots of freight of various catgories. It also sold various service levels ranging from it'll get there eventually up to we'll dispatch a plane right now just for your box. Prices varied accordingly.

The bottom line was freight was loaded in priority order, period. If we were a little low on high priority stuff that day/week, the low priority stuff might get there overnight.

If we were heavy on high priority stuff, there'd be an effort to increase capacity, but that only went so far; we couldn't create airplanes & crews out of thin air every December to handle the XMas rush of gotta be there by the 25th freight.

Nothing ever sat any longer than was necessary. Because we were predominantly a passenger carrier, sometime freight sat so we wouldn't bump people or their baggage. FedEx/UPS has no such concerns. They will get stuff where it's going as fast as they can without impacting higher priority items.


Note they will be trying to dynamically size their operational capacity to the number of tons of demand they have. If they find low-priority stuff is getting from Seattle to Chicago overnight very often, that means it's time to put a smaller, cheaper plane on that route. How quickly and efficiently they can do that has a big impact on their overall efficiency & profitability.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 03-29-2009 at 10:38 AM..
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  #16  
Old 07-14-2012, 11:26 AM
XENON9199 XENON9199 is offline
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Same here they claim that they can't deliver my package untill monday and it is only 5 min away from my house.... I can't even go an pick it up
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Old 07-14-2012, 12:27 PM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
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Originally Posted by XENON9199 View Post
Same here they claim that they can't deliver my package untill monday and it is only 5 min away from my house.... I can't even go an pick it up
A Romero DVD?



Since this was first posted some years ago, I've noticed I usually get my packages before the est day, but not amazingly so.
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  #18  
Old 07-14-2012, 12:30 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Pretty much I think that both UPS and Fedex dudes hide in the bushes until I leave, then sprint to the front door to leave a Notice instead of the actual package.
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  #19  
Old 07-14-2012, 07:04 PM
steviep24 steviep24 is offline
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So zombies work at Fedex and UPS?
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:00 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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We recently bought a large item online. It sat at the local UPS warehouse for 3 days before it was delivered. Apparently the weight of the item prevented it from being put on the next truck like our usual deliveries.

Given its size and weight, it would have been a priority to get it out of the warehouse if that was the only issue. But not always.
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Old 07-15-2012, 11:20 AM
ScarletNumber ScarletNumber is offline
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Originally Posted by steviep24 View Post
So zombies work at Fedex and UPS?
Wow, a zombie joke. Tres clever...
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  #22  
Old 07-15-2012, 11:24 AM
Laggard Laggard is offline
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I used to work in shipping. UPS will hold onto a package and not deliver it till the date it is supposed to be delivered. Fed Ex will deliver it early if they have it locally. At least that is their policy.

Last edited by Laggard; 07-15-2012 at 11:25 AM..
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  #23  
Old 07-16-2012, 01:07 AM
Frosty Camel Frosty Camel is offline
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20 year veteran here of one of the big courier companies. You will forgive me if I won't say which one. I started out in 1989 as a part-time driver and worked my way up to regional operations manager. I decided a few years back that I had given enough of my life to the courier industry and retired. I realize that this is an old thread, but I wasn't around when it was started.

In answer to the OP, sometime yes and sometimes no. As a general rule, if an early package was going to an address, or near an address, where the driver was going to be delivering to anyway, the early package would be delivered. If the driver did not have any packages that were going nearby, it would be held.

It was the drivers decision (for the most part). When I was a driver, I would deliver any package that arrived early if it was at all possible. It was a very rare occurrence for me to hold something for the next day. My reasoning was that you never knew what would happen tomorrow and it was better to start each day "clean". There may be a late truck, or you might be overloaded. At the other extreme, some drivers would almost never take out a package that wasn't due to be delivered that day. Most drivers were somewhere between those two extremes.

There were also remote delivery areas that we would only deliver to every other day. For example, there were places in the Western United States where one driver would cover two counties, both remote and thinly populated. The driver would take out all the packages for county A and leave behind all packages for county B. Then do the exact opposite the next day.

Most of the time packages would arrive at the destination station on the same day they were due for delivery. The exceptions were mainly packages that came from an origin that was within the same regional hub. All packages going from, for example, Houston to Dallas, or New York to Philadelphia, would be trucked overnight regardless of service level. 2 day packages would make the trip right alongside the overnight shipments. The other exception would be mis-sorts. If the origin station mistakenly put a 3 day shipment in the overnight container, it would arrive at its destination 2 days early.
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  #24  
Old 07-16-2012, 03:24 AM
cochrane cochrane is offline
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Originally Posted by ScarletNumber View Post
Wow, a zombie joke. Tres clever...
I thought NoClueBoy's was cleverer.
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Old 09-19-2012, 11:28 PM
thirteenthree thirteenthree is offline
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I thought NoClueBoy's was cleverer.
This is a 2009 thread and the OP is banned, so at the very least it's a zombie thread.

I can't speak for FedEx but here's how UPS rolls:

For ground shipments specifically, in Chicago, your package would likely enter the sort facility in Hodgkins IL where it shows up on one truck and gets loaded onto a high-speed conveyor system with hydraulic flappers that knock the box onto the (usually) correct truck.

UPS is proud of the fact that this process takes anywhere from 5 to 11 minutes to get off of one truck and onto any one of dozens of waiting trucks backed up to the sort facility. Some of the trucks are headed for other hubs and sort facilities and some of the trucks will go to the local office for pickup and delivery.

The only consideration that's really given is when they're being unloaded from trucks, and they're sorted out as "small sort" (envelopes and things that would fit into a mailbox basically), medium sort, and bulk (large or over 90 pounds.)

Small sort items get plucked off of a conveyor and sorted through, then they get aggregated into larger bags, tagged, and delivered to a common destination that way -- its too easy to lose an individual item otherwise.

Medium sort items get put, label up (facing any which way), onto a slow moving conveyor that unloads onto a series of progressively faster moving conveyors until it makes its way through the sort facility and onto a big oval-shaped central conveyor that travels around a garage bay with trucks backed up to it.

Packages travel through a huge barcode scanner that aims every which possible way, it measures about 4'x4', and hydraulic arms knock packages off of the central conveyor and down a chute to the (again, usually) correct outbound truck.

Meanwhile, oversized and overweight packages travel on a separate conveyor thats very slow, very wide, and very low to the ground. They don't want heavy things falling on people, and while those hydraulic arms pack a punch -- you dont want to get hit by one -- it's only reliable up to a certain size and weight.

Occasionally boxes get busted up there. Very rarely, things come flying off of the conveyor and fall to the ground. The most memorable one was a full box of loose nuts and bolts that had only been wrapped in a clear garbage bag. When the hydraulic arm spanked that thing, nuts and bolts rained everywhere and it damaged one of the conveyors.

Again they're very proud of the fact that this thing takes 5-11 minutes to get inside of that enormous facility and back onto a truck. There's no incentive to stall the process, its designed for get-in-and-get-OUT with no capacity whatsoever for intentionally retaining items.

As for the earlier comment about the bushes... I laughed. UPS does not make money sending a truck to your house three times, there is no conspiracy there, but that comes down to bad drivers, some are absolutely lazy and shady. After that sort of thing became a pattern, I pointed a motion-activated webcam at the courtyard and caught my driver slapping a notice and darting back on his truck as fast as his legs would go. I called the depot and raised holy heck over that, and what do you know, UPS suddenly became reliable again.

There are also bad apples in the sort facilities -- despite employees being scanned, searched, and going through a metal detector in and out, things somehow still get stolen. It's amazing. But that's all the more reason that idle packages sitting around are a liability. They don't want your phone or laptop or whatever sitting on a shelf unguarded for two days.
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  #26  
Old 09-19-2012, 11:37 PM
thirteenthree thirteenthree is offline
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They don't want your phone or laptop or whatever sitting on a shelf unguarded for two days.
^^ or your big box of loosely packed nuts and bolts. sorry, couldn't help myself.
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  #27  
Old 09-20-2012, 01:56 AM
IAmNotSpartacus IAmNotSpartacus is offline
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I ordered some bubble wrap for my business and the company shipped last Tuesday it via UPS Ground from Lenexa, KS to me. The tracking number shows original delivery estimated delivery on Friday, UPS' standard transit time for that zone combo. Almost immediately upon tracking showing up, it then showed estimated delivery on Thursday, a day early. Seeing the local hub it went through shows me it was put on an airplane, hence the 2 day service.

So, not only will UPS deliver a day early (they don't like to hold onto packages at the local hub if they don't have to), they will put ground packages on an airplane if the network can accommodate it. Rare that it happens, but still, it'll happen from time to time.

As an old UPS driver once explained to me... you don't pay for the name of the service, you pay for the timeframe of delivery. How UPS or FedEx or whomever get it there is up to them.

Last edited by IAmNotSpartacus; 09-20-2012 at 01:57 AM..
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  #28  
Old 09-20-2012, 06:56 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Originally Posted by thirteenthree View Post
Occasionally boxes get busted up there. Very rarely, things come flying off of the conveyor and fall to the ground. The most memorable one was a full box of loose nuts and bolts that had only been wrapped in a clear garbage bag. When the hydraulic arm spanked that thing, nuts and bolts rained everywhere and it damaged one of the conveyors.

Again they're very proud of the fact that this thing takes 5-11 minutes to get inside of that enormous facility and back onto a truck. There's no incentive to stall the process, its designed for get-in-and-get-OUT with no capacity whatsoever for intentionally retaining items.
Do I understand the first paragraph correctly - a bunch of bolts in a garbage bag, or was there actually some kind of other packaging involved?

As for the 5-11 minutes estimate - how long do some of those trucks stay parked in the yard before/after the transfer?

(Full disclosure: My husband is a USPS letter carrier in the Chicago suburbs, but has full respect for UPS/FedEx workers. And honestly, the vast majority of packages seem to come through just fine.)
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  #29  
Old 09-20-2012, 07:37 AM
cochrane cochrane is offline
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Originally Posted by thirteenthree View Post
This is a 2009 thread and the OP is banned, so at the very least it's a zombie thread.
Yeah, I knew that. I was showing my appreciation for NoClueBoy's Romero reference in post #17. As in George Romero, director of "Night of the Living Dead."
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  #30  
Old 05-29-2013, 06:44 AM
twilightlove twilightlove is offline
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Fedex sucks!!!

Fedex sucks don't you remember they throw boxes over the fence! Also I ordered a pa large on may 22. Went out may 22 and it is now the 29 I'm still waiting. It went from Orlando to cocoa at 5:12pm today may 29.2013. Its like why stop.a city over bring me my package. I hope next.time someonei yes me ups!
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  #31  
Old 05-29-2013, 06:57 AM
Omar Little Omar Little is online now
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Fedex sucks

I never saw the movie Twilight or read any of the books, but I recall that they were about vampires and werewolves. Were there ZOMBIES in those books?
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  #32  
Old 05-29-2013, 07:50 AM
bob++ bob++ is offline
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Not the same I know, but I worked in the UK for a large haulage company that shifts pallets all over the UK. They offer two levels of service, 'A' = next day, and 'B' = 3 days. (longer for islands).

The system works by shipping all the pallets collected during the day, up to a central hub, and then using the same trucks to take the pallets for local distribution back from the hub in the morning. A single depot may send from two to ten trucks (15'6" double deckers mostly) every night.

'B' service pallets are loaded last, both at the original depot and again at the hub, although the hub aims to be as empty as possible by mid morning every day. It is up to the receiving depot to ensure that all pallets are delivered by the time they are due. Bearing in mind that many 'A' pallets are time sensitive and some 'B' pallets will have become 'A' by the time they arrive, this take some good organisation. The objective is to deliver as much as possible each day and to fulfill ALL delivery requirements even if extra transport has to be hired in. Depots are fined for non compliance.

We were asked many times whether we deliberately delayed 'B' pallets and I could always answer, truthfully, no. On the other hand, if I were a shipper, I would not use the 'A' service unless time was really of the essence. The fact was that most of those were delivered either the next day or the day after.

Last edited by bob++; 05-29-2013 at 07:53 AM..
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  #33  
Old 05-29-2013, 07:53 AM
anson2995 anson2995 is offline
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I never saw the movie Twilight or read any of the books, but I recall that they were about vampires and werewolves. Were there ZOMBIES in those books?
There were in the fifth book, "Waiting Impatiently"
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  #34  
Old 05-29-2013, 08:08 AM
Laggard Laggard is offline
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When i was in shipping UPS' policy was to deliver it as soon as possible regardless of the given delivery date. Fed Ex on the other hand had a policy of waiting until the delivery date to deliver.
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  #35  
Old 05-29-2013, 03:05 PM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
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Zombification noted, but I think this is an interesting topic, especially with regard to UPS and FedEx having different policies:

UPS is mainly a truck based service. They will project an arrival date, but basically don't promise. If you want a promise, it costs you, and you have a wing (heh!) of the company that is an air freight service. that runs llike the FedEx model

If UPS ground gets it there sooner than projection, it is good customer relations, and to hold packages would require warehouse space, and more importantly extra labor and logistics to keep track of them and when to deliver them.

FedEx (air, not ground) is a intended as premium priced overnight shipping service. In order to offer this, they have to run a plane in and out of Memphis on every spoke, every day. They fine tune their pricing so that the price is worth it to people who really need overnight delivery. But at these prices, the airplanes are mostly not filled. Lowering prices on overnight packages would result in more packages, but maybe not more profit. Offering afternoon delivery, and two-day delivery options results in full airplanes without diluting the profit on the urgent packages. But if they went ahead and delivered them, then customers would stop paying the overnight rate, so they have to hold them to avert this. The extra time probably does give them some options not to run extra aircraft on occasion. Selling the same product "de-tuned" for several price points has been done by microprocessor makers and outboard boat motors, so it wouldn't be unique to the parcel market.

FedEx ground is a trucking service like UPS, and delivers early when possible, IME. I think FedEx bought into this to compete with UPS so that UPS couldn't use it's ground service to subsidize it's overnight air service which would cut into FedEx's real niche.
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  #36  
Old 05-29-2013, 05:58 PM
runningdude runningdude is offline
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I thought it amusing how UPS employee say it's always UPS's policy to deliver as soon as possible (while FedEx would hold the package), while FedEx employees state the opposite (that it's UPS that would hold the package!).

Last edited by runningdude; 05-29-2013 at 05:59 PM..
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  #37  
Old 05-29-2013, 06:38 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is offline
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Originally Posted by Kevbo View Post
UPS is mainly a truck based service. They will project an arrival date, but basically don't promise. If you want a promise, it costs you, and you have a wing (heh!) of the company that is an air freight service. that runs llike the FedEx model
Both Fedex Ground and UPS Ground guarantee the delivery dates for their normal ground service packages, except during the 10 days before Christmas. They will refund your shipping charges if they fail to deliver on time, but only if you file a refund claim (they will not notify you). There are many companies out there that will audit UPS and FedEx shipments for large shippers and make their refund claims. There is no extra charge for the guarantee.

Quote:
In order to offer this, they have to run a plane in and out of Memphis on every spoke, every day.
In the early days of FedEx Express, they used to ship every package through Memphis, even if you were shipping across the street. Their network is more sophisticated now. Although Memphis is still their largest hub, they have many more hubs both in the US and abroad.

Whereas FedEx Express and FedEx Ground are operated as if they were two independent companies, UPS Air and Ground operations are much more integrated. They won't necessarily fly a package anywhere if they can get it there by truck. Just coincidentally, I tracked a 2nd Day Air package that was sent last Thursday from Ontario CA and guaranteed for delivery in Chicago on Tuesday. Since Monday was a holiday, they had five days to deliver. The package took a scenic road trip along I-80. This is not the first time I have seen this happen, it is quite common.

As far as holding packages goes, my observation was that UPS was far more likely to delay a package until the scheduled delivery date than FedEx Ground was. But something changed about a year ago. Both seem to be quite willing to get them there early without hesitation.
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  #38  
Old 05-29-2013, 11:52 PM
Princhester Princhester is offline
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Originally Posted by Laggard View Post
When i was in shipping UPS' policy was to deliver it as soon as possible regardless of the given delivery date. Fed Ex on the other hand had a policy of waiting until the delivery date to deliver.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laggard View Post
I used to work in shipping. UPS will hold onto a package and not deliver it till the date it is supposed to be delivered. Fed Ex will deliver it early if they have it locally. At least that is their policy.
One or other of your posts contains reliable information, I'm sure. But which?

Last edited by Princhester; 05-29-2013 at 11:53 PM..
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  #39  
Old 05-30-2013, 12:15 AM
Magiver Magiver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princhester View Post
One or other of your posts contains reliable information, I'm sure. But which?
UPS has a substantial truck hub system. They are capable of delivering next day service by truck in many places. It becomes a marketing problem if you're delivering multi-day service the next day.

I will say that UPS didn't have the best of tracking systems years ago. It's improved greatly. I would hazard a guess that they didn't have the capacity to recognize marketing over-deliveries back then. I would be surprised if they still deliver freight ahead of schedule.
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  #40  
Old 05-30-2013, 10:31 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is online now
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Ground shipping never moves on weekends. Wherever it is at 5 pm Friday, that's exactly where it will be at 8 am Monday. Five days means "five business days".

Last edited by jtur88; 05-30-2013 at 10:32 AM..
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  #41  
Old 05-30-2013, 02:10 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Ground shipping never moves on weekends. Wherever it is at 5 pm Friday, that's exactly where it will be at 8 am Monday. Five days means "five business days".
That's not true at all. If it were true, it would be impossible to tender a package on Friday and have it delivered on Monday.

Go to the UPS Time and Cost Calculator. In the left hand column, select United States, use Columbus as the origin city with zip code 43202. For the destination city, select United States, Chicago, 60601. For destination type, use Residential Address. For shipping date use May 31, 2013 (or a future Friday). Then click the UPDATE button. In the right panel, under UPS Ground, it will show the guaranteed delivery date as Monday (unless Monday is a holiday). (Deliveries from Columbus OH to Chicago IL are guaranteed one business day.)

What is true is that weekends and holidays are not counted as transit time for the purposes of the UPS Delivery Guarantee. But packages are most certainly moving during the weekend if necessary.

Last edited by Alley Dweller; 05-30-2013 at 02:14 PM..
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  #42  
Old 05-30-2013, 03:19 PM
boytyperanma boytyperanma is offline
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Fedex does not 'hold' packages. Expedited shipping options such as two day or next day do get priority when it comes to loading trucks so if their is limited space a larger standard ground package might have to wait around for the next load.

There is some ethical quandaries retailers must deal with as their customers often have no clue how shipping actually works. Fedex and UPS with take whatever amount of money you give them even if it's more than necessary to meet your shipping needs.

If a customer orders a widget and selects next day service even though they are already in a one day ship zone, how should it be handled? A. Charge the customer for next day air and ship next day air, giving UPS or Fedex the extra money. B. Charge the customer for Next day air and ship it one day ground pocketing the extra money. C. Refund the customer the extra shipping paid and ship the package one day ground. D. Something else.
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Old 05-30-2013, 03:40 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boytyperanma View Post
Fedex does not 'hold' packages. Expedited shipping options such as two day or next day do get priority when it comes to loading trucks so if their is limited space a larger standard ground package might have to wait around for the next load.
That does not happen with FedEx. FedEx Ground and FedEx Express are two separate companies. Ground and Express packages would never be placed on the same truck together. Ground and Express have completely separate sorting, transportation, and delivery networks. They do not share hubs or sorting facilities.

That is one of the major complaints FedEx customers have: If you have UPS Ground and UPS Air packages to ship, one driver comes by and picks them both up. If you have FedEx Ground and FedEx Express packages to ship, you have to wait for two different trucks to come by. Your Express driver cannot accept a Ground package (or vice versa).

Quote:
There is some ethical quandaries retailers must deal with as their customers often have no clue how shipping actually works. Fedex and UPS with take whatever amount of money you give them even if it's more than necessary to meet your shipping needs.

If a customer orders a widget and selects next day service even though they are already in a one day ship zone, how should it be handled? A. Charge the customer for next day air and ship next day air, giving UPS or Fedex the extra money. B. Charge the customer for Next day air and ship it one day ground pocketing the extra money. C. Refund the customer the extra shipping paid and ship the package one day ground. D. Something else.
I regularly do business with one company that is within the next-day UPS Ground delivery area. The only shipping options they offer are standard or 2nd Day Air. If you choose standard, they take up to a week to ship and use Smart Post when they do ship. If you choose 2nd Day Air, they actually pay for 2nd Day Air service and ship the next day. I wish they would offer a service where they ship the next day and use UPS Ground.
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Old 05-30-2013, 04:50 PM
RaftPeople RaftPeople is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Ground shipping never moves on weekends. Wherever it is at 5 pm Friday, that's exactly where it will be at 8 am Monday. Five days means "five business days".
FedEx Home delivers on Sat but not on Mon, still 5 days, but not business days
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  #45  
Old 05-31-2013, 12:13 AM
Magiver Magiver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
Anecdotes don't equal data.

I'm sorry I don't have a cite for this, but as far as I know, UPS will deliver packages as soon as they can. Why? They want to get rid of them! The longer a package stays in their system, the more it costs them, in terms of warehouse space, handling costs, and liability risk.
No.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
So it's entirely in UPS's best interest to move things along and get them delivered as soon as they can. Since they are mainly using excess transport capacity, it costs them little or nothing extra to do this.
where are you getting this from? Excess capacity costs money.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LSLGuy View Post
I've never worked for FedEx or UPS, but my airline used to haul lots of freight of various catgories. It also sold various service levels ranging from it'll get there eventually up to we'll dispatch a plane right now just for your box. Prices varied accordingly.

The bottom line was freight was loaded in priority order, period. If we were a little low on high priority stuff that day/week, the low priority stuff might get there overnight.
This. I have quite a few years in airfreight spanning a number of major companies. This is how it works. There is all kinds of crossover between day and night flights and truck routes to various hubs and secondary carriers.

Last edited by Magiver; 05-31-2013 at 12:14 AM..
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  #46  
Old 05-31-2013, 10:22 AM
Laggard Laggard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princhester View Post
One or other of your posts contains reliable information, I'm sure. But which?
Awww crap. I'm going to go with :Originally Posted by Laggard
When i was in shipping UPS' policy was to deliver it as soon as possible regardless of the given delivery date. Fed Ex on the other hand had a policy of waiting until the delivery date to deliver."

Now I am doubting myself.
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  #47  
Old 10-02-2013, 11:45 AM
Kevinm78 Kevinm78 is offline
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Today's experience

I've been reading all of the reasons a package wouldn't be delivered early, but none make sense based on my experience this week.

I ordered two packages from a company over the weekend for three day delivery. They were ordered separately, so there were two shipments. On Monday I ordered two packages from Amazon using two day Prime delivery. All four packages arrived at local hubs yesterday, three at a hub about 30 miles away, one at a hub within ten miles. The three day packages arrived at least two hours before the two day packages. The two day packages are out for delivery, the three day - even though they arrived at the sort facility earlier and one is at the closest facility, remain sitting at the warehouse.

So they are all going to the same address, they are all approximately the same size, take up the same space, use the same driver, etc. One three day is at a sort facility really close. The only explanation I can see is that they are intentionally being delayed.
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  #48  
Old 10-02-2013, 11:59 AM
Telemark Telemark is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevinm78 View Post
The only explanation I can see is that they are intentionally being delayed.
How about they arrive in different locations in the facility, via different means. The sorting and delivery scheduling algorithms have different priority settings. Space is limited on trucks and higher priority package get the space first.

Logistics are complex, and lots of factors go into getting packages on trucks.
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  #49  
Old 10-02-2013, 12:03 PM
friedo friedo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevinm78 View Post
The only explanation I can see is that they are intentionally being delayed.
That's one possible explanation. Another is that there was higher-priority stuff that had to go on your guy's truck that day.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:19 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by friedo View Post
That's one possible explanation. Another is that there was higher-priority stuff that had to go on your guy's truck that day.


Which is- “intentionally being delayed”. There’s a business reason for it, sure, but still his goods are being delayed on purpose.
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