The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-20-2009, 10:17 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 10,787
Your thoughts on a 3.7 liter 5-cylinder Chevy engine?

These questions deal with the Chevrolet 3.7 litre 5-cylinder engine; and are for our automotive experts and anybody else who may have had experience with this engine.

My wife and I are considering buying a new truck at some point in the next year or so. Recently, the Chevy Colorado caught our eye. In doing a bit of online looking at the truck, we noticed that among the engine offerings is a 3.7 litre, 5-cylinder, aluminum block engine. Questions:

-- I'm a little leery of a 5-cylinder engine. I'm unfamiliar with odd numbers of cylinders in anything except small two-stroke engines, such as lawnmowers. Why did Chevy choose to put an engine with an odd number of cylinders into production? How well does this Chevy 5-cylinder perform, in your experience? How reliable is it?

-- The online literature mentioned that this was an aluminum block with "cast-iron inserts." I'm assuming that these inserts line the cylinders themselves. Didn't GM try aluminum blocks back in the 1970s with various small Chevys and Pontiacs, and didn't they turn out to be disasters? IIRC, it had something to do with the differing expansion rates of aluminum and iron when heated (and there is no doubt that an engine heats up), resulting in unpredictable stresses on parts. Has GM fixed this problem? Has it re-engineered these aluminum blocks to account for past problems? Or is it simply trying again and hoping for the best?

I'll admit I'm attracted to this engine, because the (approx) 150 hp or so 4-cylinder seems a little small for a truck this size, but the 300 hp V-8 seems too much. But as I said, I'm not entirely sure about an aluminum 5-cylinder. I will, of course, look to other published consumer and automotive information as well, but for now ... any thoughts?
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 04-20-2009, 10:32 AM
gonzomax gonzomax is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: michigan
Posts: 26,307
I had Chevy Vega with an aluminum block. It warped and became a huge problem. They rebuilt it twice. I was without it for a month each time. That was a long time ago. I am sure they are better now.
  #3  
Old 04-20-2009, 11:46 AM
Rocketeer Rocketeer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Aluminum blocks with steel or iron cylinder liners (inserts) have been around for a long time, so i wouldn't be worried about that.

What I would worry about is the vibration issues with a five-cylinder, their propensity to make all the power of a four while providing the fuel economy of a six (at least VW's does), and GM's practice of conducting product durability testing using their customers.
  #4  
Old 04-20-2009, 02:40 PM
smithsb smithsb is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: mid-Pacific
Posts: 1,486
Vibration should be unremarkable - it's an in-line design, not a V type construction. Seems to be a modern design with dual overhead camshafts. BMW is a prominent producer of in-line fours and sixes and Volvo used to have/still has in-line 5 cylinder engines. They are considered quite smooth. Modern aluminum block engines bear no resemblance to the Vega engine. Cast iron liners are common, along with metallic powder coatings to increase wear resistance. The power and torque increase over the four doesn't quite split the difference to the V-8 option. Depends on your needs. Are you going to tow trailers and the like?
  #5  
Old 04-20-2009, 03:19 PM
Spoons Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 10,787
Quote:
Originally Posted by smithsb View Post
Vibration should be unremarkable - it's an in-line design, not a V type construction. Seems to be a modern design with dual overhead camshafts. BMW is a prominent producer of in-line fours and sixes and Volvo used to have/still has in-line 5 cylinder engines. They are considered quite smooth. Modern aluminum block engines bear no resemblance to the Vega engine. Cast iron liners are common, along with metallic powder coatings to increase wear resistance. The power and torque increase over the four doesn't quite split the difference to the V-8 option. Depends on your needs. Are you going to tow trailers and the like?
No. I can see where towing a large camping/RV trailer would require the power of the V-8, but we don't plan to do any towing. We do plan on loading and moving various building materials and large objects from time to time, which explains our interest in a pickup truck; but for our needs, such a truck doen't have to be full-sized. Reliability is key though, as is fuel efficiency--I realize we won't get the best fuel efficiency with any engine that can power a truck, but since we're not going to (for example) pull heavy RV trailers, the V-8's power seems like overkill and its comparatively worse (over the I-5) fuel efficiency makes me wonder if the smaller engine is a better choice to meet our needs. Hence my interest in the I-5.

I remember those old Chevy Vegas too, which explains my concerns with aluminum blocks. But it seems that the problems have been largely dealt with, if Volvo can make them work. (And assuming that Chevy is following Volvo's design and engineering reasonably closely.)

Thanks for the responses so far, folks--looking forward to more, if anybody has more to offer.
  #6  
Old 04-20-2009, 03:24 PM
engineer_comp_geek engineer_comp_geek is offline
Robot Mod in Beta Testing
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 8,828
I have no practical experience at all with this engine, but I have heard some people complain that it really doesn't have much more power than the 4 cyl version. The specs I've seen don't seem to agree with these complaints, though (282 vs 185 hp), so make what you will of that.

A lot of folks have made successful aluminum engines. Of course, that doesn't mean that GM's version is good, it just means that aluminum isn't necessarily that it's bad.

The specs for the V8 don't seem too bad, though. They list 21 mpg highway for both the 5 cyl and the 8 cyl, and 15 mpg city for the V8 and 16 for the 5 cyl. I personally would probably be more inclined to go with the V8.
  #7  
Old 04-20-2009, 03:46 PM
MrSquishy MrSquishy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
I really don't have much help to offer other than to chime in that I have a 2005 Volvo with an I-5 engine. I get good fuel economy and it has enough power for me (although it does have a turbo on it).

Here's a Wikipedia article that doesn't give an awful lot of interesting information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T5_engine.
  #8  
Old 04-20-2009, 04:48 PM
VanLandry VanLandry is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
I was thinking of starting a similiar thread but more about the colorado as a package as opposed to just the engine. I was planning on waiting a year or two and buy a used truck but am seriously thinking of taking advantage of the 0% financing, employee pricing, cash back, etc. deals that GM has been promoting recently and buy new.

My brother is a mechanic and he said there was nothing inherently wrong with I5's. Just more power than a 4 and less than a 6.. essentially, exactly what you would expect from a 5 cyl. engine.

I may take one for a drive on Wednesday and will update this thread on my findings but until then hopefully some folks will add their experiences.
  #9  
Old 04-20-2009, 05:18 PM
Santo Rugger Santo Rugger is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoons View Post
IIRC, it had something to do with the differing expansion rates of aluminum and iron when heated (and there is no doubt that an engine heats up), resulting in unpredictable stresses on parts.
While aluminum has about a 60% higher coefficient of thermal expansion, modern finite element programs make thermal stresses quite predictable.
  #10  
Old 04-20-2009, 06:09 PM
Varrius Varrius is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
I will start by saying I am not an automotive expert but I do have a lot of hands-on experience with engines and other machinery as well as material properties of metals, so FWIW...
I own a 2004 GMC pickup with a 5.3 liter V-8 (my second) and I have owned a full-sized pickup with a slant-6 (Dodge). I can't see ever driving a full-sized pickup with anything less than a six cylinder. My mileage with the 5.3 is around 17 in the city and upwards of 21-22 on the highway. Better even than what I got with a 5.0 liter V-8 in my last GMC (1997).

As to aluminum engines, I had a 1971 Vega with a 2.3 liter aluminum engine that I destroyed (crack in the head allowed oil/water to mix and overheated big-time) but as gonzomax stated, that was a long time ago. VW was building aluminum engines in the Bug for a long time and I never had any problem with them. Steel sleeves in aluminum blocks are no problem these days as Santo Rugger discussed.

As to odd-number cylinders, Subaru (among others) had a three-cylinder engine back in the 80s that, IIRC, was pretty reliable and didn't have the vibration you mentioned. Mazda's five-cylinder was an awesome engine, albeit it was a rotary and not subject to the vibration you mentioned.

Although I didn't really provide any information on the GM five cylinder (because I don't know anything about it) I hope that my experience with the GM trucks and aluminum engines is helpful. If not... (to paraphrase Wilbon and Kornheiser) I'll try to do better next time.
  #11  
Old 04-20-2009, 08:11 PM
Unintentionally Blank Unintentionally Blank is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Varrius View Post
Mazda's five-cylinder was an awesome engine, albeit it was a rotary and not subject to the vibration you mentioned.
Oh dear. That statement didn't even come close to parsing.

This is a rotary engine:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotary_engine
Mazda never put those in a car. They DID put a Wankel in a number of cars...still do in fact:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wankel_engine

It too is called a 'rotary engine', but there's no way it could be mis-construed as a five cylinder anything.

That aside. GM powertrain can easily be considered one of the best engine manufacturers that exist. Their ability to make a strong, long running, great gas mileage engine is unsurpassed. Their current testing methodology puts a design through things you'd never EVER consider doing (like fire up, bury the throttle, and run Wide Open for a week straight. Or cold start a motor in 40 below weather, time after time after time) Folks are accurately stating the Vega design is firmly in the past, but it helps to remember that it was _38_ years in the past.

A version of this motor has already been used in this situation since 2004. More than long enough for Inline 5 Colorado Sucks to show up in google if it's going to. (On the first page, the only sucks comment is by a Tacoma Owner with no firsthand experience)

The only motor I'd have _more_ confidence in is GM's V8. The Gen IV V8 is an amazing piece of work and I can point you at a TON of information on it, but it doesn't sound like that's the direction you're leaning in.
  #12  
Old 04-21-2009, 07:17 AM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Miami, Florida USA
Posts: 6,729
Audi also had an inline 5-cylinder engine for many years back in the mid '80s. Vibration was never a problem.

Whether GM got it right this time is a separate issue, but the mere fact of it having 5 cylinders doesn't represent an insurmountable obstacle to smooth operation.
  #13  
Old 04-21-2009, 08:10 AM
Rick Rick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 15,697
Volvo has been producing 5 cylinder engines since 1992.
This design is known for very low vibration. Rather than having 2 crank throws like a 4 cylinder (2 cylinders up, 2 cylinders down) or 3 crank throws like a 6 cylinder (2 up, 2 down, 2 midway) it has 5 evenly spaced crank throws. Make for much smoother power delivery than an I4.
The Volvo engine is also aluminum with cast iron sleeves. Absolutely no problems with this. Here is the deal. From a emissions and gas mileage standpoint, Aluminum is perfect. It heats up quick, throws off heat easily, and is a snap to cast. The problem is that piston rings really don't like aluminum (See early Vega). Piston rings like cast iron. Making the entire engine out of CI has some real drawbacks these days. first off it is heavy, secondly it is hard to heat up and it retains heat. All of which are issues from an emissions and gas mileage point of view.
So the solution that engine designers have gone to is a aluminum block with cast iron liners. This way you get the best of both worlds. This is a very common solution used by car makers around the world. I doubt that you could find an aluminum block engine without cast iron liners in current production from anybody. I could be wrong, but I sure can't think of any car maker that makes aluminum engines w/o liners.
Answering the OP's other questions. The problem with the Vega engine was not thermal expansion, but rather the piston rings wearing out the cylinder walls. This engine did not have iron liners. Iron liners fixes the problems that were associated with Vega engines.
Why a 5? I6 engines are long, and you can't build a smooth running 3+ liter I4. It would be just too rough running.
My take? If you like how the truck drives and that engine seems to fill your needs, go for it. I can see nothing in the OP to rule it out.

Last edited by Rick; 04-21-2009 at 08:12 AM..
  #14  
Old 04-21-2009, 11:33 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 10,787
Thanks for the responses, folks. You've made me think that these engines are seriously worth considering--especially since the old Vega engines appear to have all the faults corrected. Thanks again!

And VanLandry, if you do take a test drive, I'd be interested in hearing how you liked it.
  #15  
Old 04-21-2009, 02:11 PM
Stoid Stoid is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: City of Angels
Posts: 14,264
Remarkably, I find that in my entire brain I cannot find so much as one single, tiny, low-maintenance thought, of any kind, about a 3.7 liter 5-cylinder Chevy engine, never mind thoughtS. Otherwise I would definitely share them with you.

  #16  
Old 04-21-2009, 02:52 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Regarding a GM aluminum engine. The engine in a Corvette is aluminum. So are the engines in many other performance cars.
  #17  
Old 04-22-2009, 11:48 AM
VanLandry VanLandry is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
I just got back from test driving a Colorado. Unfortunately they only had a 4 cyl so I can't offer any insight on the OP. They're trying to track one down at another dealer and swap one of their 4 bangers for it. I'll give them till the weekend and then I'll go find one myself. I'll post my findings here if I do get to drive one. On paper the I5 has the exact same displacement as the Dakota V6 and more hp and approximately the same power as the Tacoma. Again, this is on paper so I'm curious to how it actually performs.

Regarding the truck itself there was nothing glaringly good or bad with it as far as I could tell. After all, it is a truck and as long as the 5 cyl has adequate power I'll seriously consider buying one.

Finally, my apologies for going even further off topic here but they also just got in a 2010 Camaro(all black). Man, what a nice looking ride that is.
  #18  
Old 04-22-2009, 07:17 PM
Varrius Varrius is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unintentionally Blank View Post
Oh dear. That statement didn't even come close to parsing.

This is a rotary engine:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotary_engine
Mazda never put those in a car. They DID put a Wankel in a number of cars...still do in fact:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wankel_engine

It too is called a 'rotary engine', but there's no way it could be mis-construed as a five cylinder anything.
Thanks for correcting me. I obviously mis-remembered it. (Is that even a word?) I should have looked it up before I posted the response.
  #19  
Old 04-24-2009, 04:30 PM
MrSquishy MrSquishy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by LSLGuy View Post
Audi also had an inline 5-cylinder engine for many years back in the mid '80s. Vibration was never a problem.

Whether GM got it right this time is a separate issue, but the mere fact of it having 5 cylinders doesn't represent an insurmountable obstacle to smooth operation.
Thanks for reminding me of this. I've actually owned two cars with an I-5 engine. The 1986 Audi 4000 I drove in university, and the 2005 Volvo V50 I have now. I didn't do that intentionally.
  #20  
Old 04-24-2009, 05:31 PM
Unintentionally Blank Unintentionally Blank is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Varrius View Post
Thanks for correcting me. I obviously mis-remembered it. (Is that even a word?) I should have looked it up before I posted the response.
I was trying to reply without coming across as snarky...did I succeed?
  #21  
Old 04-24-2009, 11:21 PM
Varrius Varrius is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unintentionally Blank View Post
I was trying to reply without coming across as snarky...did I succeed?
I did not take it as being snarky. You were right, I was not. I remembered the Mazda rotary (as I still think they advertised it) engine and my memory was flawed. It happens, especially at a "certain" age. No worries.
  #22  
Old 04-24-2009, 11:34 PM
sovtawen sovtawen is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
I own a 2006 Colorado with the I-5. It runs fine and I haven't noticed any excessive vibration or noise. I haven't towed much with it though.
  #23  
Old 04-25-2009, 09:53 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 10,787
Quote:
Originally Posted by sovtawen View Post
I own a 2006 Colorado with the I-5. It runs fine and I haven't noticed any excessive vibration or noise. I haven't towed much with it though.
How do you like it overall? Pretty reliable, good on gas? Would you buy another? (Looking for comments from the voice of experience here.)
  #24  
Old 05-11-2010, 07:49 PM
tdyac tdyac is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2010
3.7 in a Colorado

What a dissappointment this product has been. I have always been a die hard Chevy truck guy. This is a 2008 4 Door Colorado 4X4 with a Z71 package. Here are the complaints...20K miliage.

Stuffing under seats is falling out, and I am not a big guy. Little pieces that looks like shop rags that are on floor between vacumings.

More seat complaints, it is a black woven material, if you have pets, good luck on trying to clean hair out of them.

If you lay anything on the front floor hump it disappears under seats and you tear up your hand trying to fish it out.

20 MPG is the best, that is puttering around. My 04 Tahoe 4.8 got that, and a 2000 Silverado with a 4.8 beat 20 also.

It always is shifting down, which is probally why milage is poor.

19000 miles and went its cold when it fires up , sounds like it has a death rap. I have always changed oil at 3k, I have to get it to a dealer, but I am so disgusted I will probally lose my cool. I gave it to my wife to drive.

Everything feels cheap, the 4 wheel drive indicator is just a pencil dot lite and it is possible to bump it in and not know it.

It is a glorified S-10, it only cost twice as much, now I am stuck with it and the remainder of the payments.
  #25  
Old 05-11-2010, 08:08 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
A friend of mine has a Colorado with an I5. It's no V8, but it's a stout engine.
  #26  
Old 05-11-2010, 08:09 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
A buddy of mine had a Colorado 5. Said it had all the power of a 4 and the gas mileage of a 6-


As far as GM aluminum engines go, are Land Rovers and Range Rovers still using the Buick 215 engine from the early sixties?
  #27  
Old 05-11-2010, 09:05 PM
pullin pullin is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: N Texas
Posts: 1,955
...and I'll chime in.

My dad has one of these Colorados, with the 5 cyl. He thinks it's a smidge under-powered, but he's a fan of big V-8s (growing up, our family sedan had a 7.4L V-8). His assessment after (iirc) 25,000 miles is that it's weak, but bulletproof. He tows a utility trailer to our deer lease containing a riding mower, and our rhino. IMO, this a fairly heavy load to tow through hills.

He wanted a larger F-150 sized truck, but needed something that would fit in his garage. The CO was a the maximum that would fit.

In short, he seems to want another (bigger) truck, but grumbles that the CO is "gonna last forever". I don't believe he's had any trouble of any type with it.
  #28  
Old 05-11-2010, 09:36 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
He can get a Colorado with a V8 now, I think.
  #29  
Old 05-12-2010, 08:31 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Four ist too small, six ist too bulky!

I was remined of the old Audi commercial, when they announced their new 5-cylinder engine; it was a dialogue between a German professor-type and a reporter:
(REporter): "Why five cylinders?"
(Professor):
"vell, four ist too small und six ist too bulky"
Why not use a V-6? Shorter block and even firing, plus less crankshaft vibration.
  #30  
Old 05-12-2010, 08:53 AM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Smack Dab in the Middle
Posts: 10,976
I drove an Audi with a 5 cyl. for close to ten years and more than 100K miles, with no engine issues.

A coworker is currently driving a Colorado with the five. Bought slightly used, has put at least 60K miles on it and no engine-related problems. Power seems adequate to me when I've ridden in it, but then I don't need to pull stumps or always be the first to the next traffic light. The truck does have the cheesy interior fittings and trim that seem to infest all GM products, but the engine itself seems fine.
  #31  
Old 05-12-2010, 08:54 AM
Unintentionally Blank Unintentionally Blank is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
I suspect it was because some engineers got bored and decided to see if they -could- make one. Heck, look at the w16.
  #32  
Old 05-12-2010, 12:25 PM
crazyjoe crazyjoe is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
I was remined of the old Audi commercial, when they announced their new 5-cylinder engine; it was a dialogue between a German professor-type and a reporter:
(REporter): "Why five cylinders?"
(Professor):
"vell, four ist too small und six ist too bulky"
Why not use a V-6? Shorter block and even firing, plus less crankshaft vibration.
This useless post brought to you by ralph124c. Thanks ralf.

A friend of mine once took me for a ride in his Hummer H3, which is based on the colorado platform but with a bunch of extra weight added.

It was definitely lacking in power. I woudl equate it to the full size Ram pickup with the V6 engine. Will it do most things a pickup will do? Yep. Would I tow something really heavy with it? No. Does it get good fuel economy? I have no experience with this, but it appears the differ3nce between the V8 and the 5 is minimal, and I have found that the extra low-end torque can add up to better economy simply because you don't have to be on the gas as hard to get up to cruising speeds.
  #33  
Old 05-12-2010, 01:36 PM
BobLibDem BobLibDem is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
I have a 2004 5 cylinder Colorado and have found the performance to be ok. It accelerates quickly enough. There are lots of quirks such as the cell phone eating area under the seats and yes, those seats do retain the pet hair. Still, not a bad truck. I've always had confidence in its acceleration to the extent that you need to have it. It won't win a drag race, but you can get up to freeway speed quickly enough.
  #34  
Old 05-12-2010, 02:16 PM
Spoons Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 10,787
Wow ... this one has returned.

As the OP, I'll give an update. Circumstances changed last year such that we did not get a truck at all, and we're going to try to make our current vehicle last a while longer. Still, I'll thank everybody for their comments--good to know that knowledge about this kind of thing is here. Thanks again!
  #35  
Old 05-12-2010, 02:37 PM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: ATX
Posts: 5,397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Varrius View Post
Steel sleeves in aluminum blocks are no problem these days as Santo Rugger discussed.
As for which engine to get, just get the V8, if conditions don't warrant all eight cylinders, the computer will turn them off for you.

Last edited by UncleRojelio; 05-12-2010 at 02:38 PM.. Reason: Noticed that this is a zombie. How is Santo doing these days?
  #36  
Old 05-12-2010, 03:35 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
In my experience with Jeeps and other various trucks, the bigger engine usually gets better gas mileage because it takes less work to get it moving and keep it at speed.
  #37  
Old 05-12-2010, 03:44 PM
Unintentionally Blank Unintentionally Blank is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
The L-98 in my Vette had no problems reaching 30 mpg when stock. Now it has a hard time reaching 18. :/
  #38  
Old 11-20-2011, 05:23 PM
afebrile afebrile is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
2005 reg cab 4x4 w/5-cyl and 5-speed tranny, 64 K on odometer. 24 mpg combined city and highway. Powerless mutha fer sure. 4-cyl Cobalt leaves me in a cloud of dust. EASILY!
  #39  
Old 11-20-2011, 05:28 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Miami, Florida USA
Posts: 6,729
This zombie has now been reanimated twice. Reported for potential closure.
  #40  
Old 11-20-2011, 07:42 PM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
Rich as a Lannister
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Near Eskippakithiki
Posts: 11,270
Since this is about a situation long since past, I'm going to close it. If any of you gearheads want to talk about cars s'more, go ahead and start a new thread!

Ellen Cherry
Closed Thread



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.