Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-29-2009, 01:19 PM
Freddy the Pig Freddy the Pig is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Illinois
Posts: 7,856
Do Japanese trains still use "pushers"?

I recently saw a video of "pushers" stuffing passengers into a Japanese train. The video appeared to be dated, and this got me to wondering whether pushers still exist.

Surely, I thought, given that Japan has been a relatively affluent society for several decades, with a fetish for public works spending, and something of a birth dearth, they must long since have built the necessary number of subway cars. But I've never been there, and so I ask.
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 04-29-2009, 01:24 PM
Whack-a-Mole Whack-a-Mole is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Posts: 18,622
Yep.

Here is a video posted about a year ago.

What a freaking nightmare.
  #3  
Old 04-29-2009, 03:32 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Trantor
Posts: 10,968
That's revolting. But it is unlikely more equipment would help. They are probably running at minimum headway already. Although the time wasted in the pushing is probably counter-productive.

Just a few days ago I read in the Montreal paper the suggestion to hire pushers here. They opened an extension to the island north of the city and it is carrying twice as many as projected, rendering that line seriously overcrowded. But they will be getting new equipment.
  #4  
Old 04-29-2009, 04:26 PM
constanze constanze is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Munich, Germany
Posts: 4,951
I don't know the numbers for Tokyo, but there is simply an upper limit of how many trains can pass a station in a certain amount of time - you can have 3 trains in 5 minutes, but you can't have 20 trains in 5 minutes.
The length of the station is also fixed and limits the length of the train. They could get double-sized trains - if their tunnels are big enough.
And space is rather limited, so they can't build additional lines.
But I guess that since many milions of people live in Tokyo, they simply have reached upper limit on how many trains they can safely run through the switches and still have safe braking distance etc., so there will simply be too many people wanting to enter not enough trains at the same time. And 80% or so of the people will start workday between 7 and 9 am, and return at the same time in the evening, so you can't space it during the day, either.
  #5  
Old 04-29-2009, 04:49 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 7,385
I have been on the Tokyo transit system during rush hour, as have many other Dopers, I'm sure. In my case very rarely, fortunately. It's unlike anything else I've ever experienced.

It's basically an unending sea of people.

Ed

Last edited by suranyi; 04-29-2009 at 04:51 PM.
  #6  
Old 04-29-2009, 05:56 PM
gaffa gaffa is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 10,694
Do they have seats on these cars? Chicago is running cars with fewer seats during rush hour, but they're doing it wrong. They stick a pair of "Max" cars to the end of the train, but the real need is in the middle of the train and platform. They don't want to spend the time to disassemble each train and stick the Max cars in the middle.

Japan truly is the frotteur's paradise.
  #7  
Old 04-29-2009, 07:19 PM
Nametag Nametag is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: California
Posts: 8,071
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaffa View Post
Japan truly is the frotteur's paradise.
OK, who's going to write the song parody?
  #8  
Old 04-29-2009, 08:53 PM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaffa View Post
Do they have seats on these cars?
Yes.

In my experience, it's never been as bad as the linked video, although once you're inside, forget about any sort of movement. There's very little that can be done because the trains are already running at extremely short intervals. The "pushers" are just train station employees, that's not all they do.
  #9  
Old 04-29-2009, 08:55 PM
Götterfunken Götterfunken is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Memphis
Posts: 1,121
Here is the Master's column on the subject (from way back in 1977): Are there really "pushers" on Tokyo subways?
  #10  
Old 04-29-2009, 09:21 PM
JpnDude JpnDude is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 1,215
YES, there are still pushers on platforms pushing people into trains during morning rush. Take it from someone who rides one of the most packed train lines into Tokyo each morning...ME.

If it is the Tokyo area, the train in the first video looks like "JR Sobu Line" that cuts across the center of the city. What is depicted there is fairly common practice. However, the pushers are necessary for an hour or so on regular weekdays and not at all stations in the city.
  #11  
Old 04-29-2009, 09:30 PM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whack-a-Mole View Post
Here is a video posted about a year ago.
Apparently, this video is from the Hibarigaoka station on the Seibu line, circa 1991. On another copy of this video, several Japanese posters are commenting about how different things are on this line nowadays. Also, this particular situation was probably due to a late train.

More recent videos:

For a more civilized endless flow of people, the Osaka subway:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rtiGLQZ2ds

Here's a demonstration of the ever-useful grab-the-edges-of-the-door-and-push-yourself-in technique:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_teqCU9aUE

And, on the left side of this you can see a station employee pushing someone in. From Tokyo's Shinjuku station, the busiest in the world.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDXticjm_Ng
  #12  
Old 04-29-2009, 09:59 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: the Keystone State
Posts: 13,496
Doesn't Japan also have "Ladies Only" train cars?
__________________
No Gods, No Masters
  #13  
Old 04-29-2009, 10:25 PM
Isamu Isamu is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Osaka
Posts: 4,876
Quote:
Originally Posted by jovan View Post

For a more civilized endless flow of people, the Osaka subway:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rtiGLQZ2ds
That's the midousuji line that I take every day. Not too crowded, unless you take it around 8am and there are pushers there.

Yes, there are women-only cars marked by signs on the station floor. About 3 carriages per train are women-only, and only between certain hours of the day.
  #14  
Old 04-29-2009, 11:34 PM
Cerowyn Cerowyn is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: In a hole
Posts: 3,436
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
Doesn't Japan also have "Ladies Only" train cars?
Yes, "Pink Cars," although they're only ladies only during rush hour.

ETA: Ack, missed Isamu's post. Oh, well. I can confirm that they have them in Tokyo as well, at least.

Last edited by Cerowyn; 04-29-2009 at 11:35 PM.
  #15  
Old 04-30-2009, 01:18 AM
ataraxy22 ataraxy22 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,509
What's the clearance in the subway tunnels like? Any chance they could run double-decker cars?
  #16  
Old 04-30-2009, 01:20 AM
jjimm jjimm is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 28,701
There were also pushers on the Hong Kong MTR last time I was there (2007), which seems to be a relatively recent "innovation".
  #17  
Old 04-30-2009, 02:06 AM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by ataraxy22 View Post
What's the clearance in the subway tunnels like? Any chance they could run double-decker cars?
I gathered this information from the Japanese Wikipedia so it's worth what it's worth but it appears that the main reason why double-decker cars aren't used is because they would actually cause congestions at the platform. Japanese train cars are designed to minimize the distance from door to standing place. A double-decker would necessarily involve more movement to get in and out, resulting in longer stops at each station.

For those curious about what a typical cars looks like inside:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...newal_2007.jpg
  #18  
Old 04-30-2009, 02:17 AM
eveanyn eveanyn is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 116
How is it possible to get off the subway if you are stuck in the middle of the car and your stop is before the folks stuffed in closer to the door?
  #19  
Old 04-30-2009, 02:25 AM
BorgHunter BorgHunter is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by eveanyn View Post
How is it possible to get off the subway if you are stuck in the middle of the car and your stop is before the folks stuffed in closer to the door?
Your guess is as good as mine how that works in train cars as packed as in the YouTube link at the top of this thread, but on the 'L' here in Chicago, it involves a lot of "excuse me"s and usually, a couple people standing in the vestibule by the open door have to step off to let you out. It is not a particularly enjoyable experience.

Last edited by BorgHunter; 04-30-2009 at 02:26 AM.
  #20  
Old 04-30-2009, 02:30 AM
sailor sailor is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Washington dc
Posts: 16,441
Japan has a population density which is about ten times as much as the USA (339 vs. 33 /Km2). This gives some perspective when people complain about immigration because "America can only hold so many people".
  #21  
Old 04-30-2009, 03:08 AM
Panurge Panurge is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: København
Posts: 1,278
Since the OP's question has been answered, allow me to present this information about the most densely packed trains in the world, the Mumbai Suburban Railway: From Wikipedia:

"Due to its extensive reach across the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, and its intensive use by the local urban population, overcrowding has grown to be a compelling problem (5,000 + passengers are packed into a 9-car rake during peak hours, as against the rated carrying capacity of 1,700). This has resulted in what is known as Super-Dense Crush Load of 14 to 16 standing passengers per square meter of floor space. Trains on the suburban line are on average more than 4 minutes apart, contributing to the problem of overcrowding."

"Super-Dense Crush Load" - wow. How is it even possible to fit 16 people in one sqm?

ETA: I have seen railway guards with lathis beat people into holding the line at Mumbai stations. This was ten years ago so I don't know if they use that "technique" anymore. I'm sure they are more efficient than "pushers" would be, given that everybody becomes a "pusher" in a packed Indian railway station

Last edited by Panurge; 04-30-2009 at 03:12 AM.
  #22  
Old 04-30-2009, 08:36 AM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by eveanyn View Post
How is it possible to get off the subway if you are stuck in the middle of the car and your stop is before the folks stuffed in closer to the door?
It's impossible. In practice, this isn't a huge problem in the morning because a lot of people get off at only a few stations. On the way back home, though, you just have to make sure you stay relatively close to the door if you get off at one of the early stations.
  #23  
Old 04-30-2009, 10:08 AM
chromaticity chromaticity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by jovan View Post
It's impossible. In practice, this isn't a huge problem in the morning because a lot of people get off at only a few stations. On the way back home, though, you just have to make sure you stay relatively close to the door if you get off at one of the early stations.
Yup. I inch my way closer to the door, as my station comes closer. Luckily I have flexible hours, so I can avoid the crowds most days. Some determined grandmas don't mind poking people mercilessly..
  #24  
Old 04-30-2009, 10:26 AM
John DiFool John DiFool is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 17,069
Anyone else have a flashback to Stephen King's Drawing of the Three?
  #25  
Old 04-30-2009, 10:28 AM
Whack-a-Mole Whack-a-Mole is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Posts: 18,622
Interesting how necessity changes things.

In Chicago when train cars are only a fraction as packed (albeit packed to my eye) the passengers push back on someone insisting on getting on. During rush hour the subway trains arrive every 3 minutes or so if not faster. If you can't get on one train wait 2-3 minutes and you are invariably first onto the next. Not too big a deal.

I wonder if a Japanese tourist in New York or Chicago, doing what they think is normal pushing themselves onto a train, have gotten themselves in trouble with other passengers?

I am also kind of amazed there is enough oxygen on such crowded trains for everybody. Fifteen people per square meter in a car like that? Sure it is not air tight but that is a lot of people sucking up oxygen. Obviously it all somehow works, just hard to imagine. Maybe they trains are built to force air in or something.

Last edited by Whack-a-Mole; 04-30-2009 at 10:30 AM.
  #26  
Old 04-30-2009, 10:37 AM
Ogre Ogre is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Bama
Posts: 10,747
I'm a giant fan of mass transit, but fuuuuuuuck that.
  #27  
Old 04-30-2009, 11:45 AM
scr4 scr4 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 13,725
Things have gotter better than in the 80s and 90s. New subway lines have been built, and many workplaces in Tokyo now have flextime plans. At one time they had trains with no seats during rush hours (the seats retract into the wall during rush hours), but I hear they are no longer in use. And even in the 90s the "pushers" were not all that common - the trains I took never needed them.

Still, it is not unusual for trains to be so crowded that you can't even move your arm, let alone read a book.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ataraxy22
What's the clearance in the subway tunnels like? Any chance they could run double-decker cars?
When you're talking about Tokyo-class crowding, you have to have a completely different mentality on train design. It's futile to try to seat as many passengers as possible; you can cram far more passengers if you eliminate seats (or reduce them as much as possible). Also you have to make the stops as short as possible so you can run more trains. Forget stairs; even seats are a hindrance to passengers moving into and out of the train. Modern Japanese commuter trains have at least 4 doors on each side of each car; some have 5, and the aforementioned seat-less trains had 6 doors on each side.

Last edited by scr4; 04-30-2009 at 11:49 AM.
  #28  
Old 04-30-2009, 11:56 AM
scr4 scr4 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 13,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whack-a-Mole View Post
I am also kind of amazed there is enough oxygen on such crowded trains for everybody.
Train cars have ventilation fans. Japanese commuter trains have very powerful air conditioners. In fact, some people complain about it being too cold - mostly outside of rush hours, I'd imagine - and many trains have one or two cars designated as "weak air conditioning" cars.
  #29  
Old 04-30-2009, 12:07 PM
Chez Guevara Chez Guevara is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 3,970
Wiki informs that originally the pushers' job title was 'passenger arrangement staff'. Or the Japanese equivalent thereof.

That is a superb euphemism and I do hope it is true.
  #30  
Old 04-30-2009, 12:20 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Falls Church, Va.
Posts: 13,113
With my luck, I'd get stuck next to the guy with the colostomy bag.
  #31  
Old 04-30-2009, 12:23 PM
runcible spoon runcible spoon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Hither and yon
Posts: 1,089
Assuming there's space for double-deckers (which, given the real-estate premium in Japan, I doubt) it seems like you could make double-decker trains accessible via double-decker platforms. It might save a little space over running two trains right over each other, although the infrastructure upgrades would be huge. I've never seen a subway with tall enough tunnels for a double-decker, though.
  #32  
Old 04-30-2009, 12:26 PM
sailor sailor is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Washington dc
Posts: 16,441
If you want space just start sneezing the sardine can flu.
  #33  
Old 04-30-2009, 01:18 PM
hibernicus hibernicus is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,188
Quote:
Originally Posted by eveanyn View Post
How is it possible to get off the subway if you are stuck in the middle of the car and your stop is before the folks stuffed in closer to the door?
One thing I've often seen happen in Japan (though the Japan-based dopers haven't mentioned it here, so maybe it's not as common as I think) is that people near the door temporarily step out onto the platform, to allow other passengers to exit. The people on the platform wait, not only to allow passengers to get out, but to allow the people who were already on the train to get back in, before they start boarding.

It strikes me as very civilised.
  #34  
Old 04-30-2009, 07:46 PM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whack-a-Mole View Post
I wonder if a Japanese tourist in New York or Chicago, doing what they think is normal pushing themselves onto a train, have gotten themselves in trouble with other passengers?
Well, at the very least, I did. After working in Osaka and doing the push-yourself-in technique I linked to every morning, I instinctively tried to do it in the Montreal subway. To me, the car didn't appear all that crowded and it was clear there was enough room to squeeze myself in. The other passengers didn't think so, however, and I was unceremoniously pushed back out with a what the fuck are you trying to do kind of look.
  #35  
Old 04-30-2009, 08:15 PM
HMS Irruncible HMS Irruncible is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 6,845
Is Japan still completely atavistic when it comes to sensible commuting strategies? When I was there, flex-time was frowned upon and telecommuting was simply unspeakable. For people who don't talk to each other much, they sure like to be around each other a lot.
  #36  
Old 04-30-2009, 08:48 PM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
Is Japan still completely atavistic when it comes to sensible commuting strategies? When I was there, flex-time was frowned upon and telecommuting was simply unspeakable. For people who don't talk to each other much, they sure like to be around each other a lot.
Like scr4 wrote, flex time is much more common now than it used to be. It's definitely not true that people don't talk to each other much. That's one reason that Japanese workplaces are open, so that people can talk to their colleagues easily.

Despite what it may appear, there is a lot of thought and work being done towards improving public transit congestion. However, ultimately you can't get around the fact that you're dealing with an urban population of over 30 million people.
  #37  
Old 04-30-2009, 09:44 PM
Cerowyn Cerowyn is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: In a hole
Posts: 3,436
My own experience is that people in Japan don't telecommute in the sense that we mean it in North America and Europe. Most business people will check and reply to emails, etc. in the evenings and [some people] on weekends. But, I don't recall anyone working from home except in exceptional circumstances.
  #38  
Old 04-30-2009, 10:09 PM
jovan jovan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerowyn View Post
My own experience is that people in Japan don't telecommute in the sense that we mean it in North America and Europe. Most business people will check and reply to emails, etc. in the evenings and [some people] on weekends. But, I don't recall anyone working from home except in exceptional circumstances.
The reason for this, I think, is related to population density through smaller living spaces. My current job would allow me to do some work from home. I tried it once, and it didn't work out. With smaller houses and apartments, there are way too many distractions like kids to be able to have any sort of productivity. My brother in law works at home in North America. He locks himself in his office, which is in the basement, and he's not to be disturbed for anything but emergencies. In Japan, there's no way something like this would be practical for the average salaryman.
  #39  
Old 04-30-2009, 10:38 PM
Cerowyn Cerowyn is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: In a hole
Posts: 3,436
Quote:
Originally Posted by jovan View Post
The reason for this, I think, is related to population density through smaller living spaces. My current job would allow me to do some work from home. I tried it once, and it didn't work out. With smaller houses and apartments, there are way too many distractions like kids to be able to have any sort of productivity. My brother in law works at home in North America. He locks himself in his office, which is in the basement, and he's not to be disturbed for anything but emergencies. In Japan, there's no way something like this would be practical for the average salaryman.
Yeah, I was going to mention something about that. I used to sit on the floor with the laptop in my... lap, since there was no real furniture in my mansion. When we moved offices, I got a place a five minute walk from the office, so much did I hate sitting on the floor to try and work (since I frequently had to coordinate stuff happening back in the Canadian office).
  #40  
Old 05-01-2009, 12:06 AM
Mojo Pin Mojo Pin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Seoul
Posts: 583
Quote:
Originally Posted by hibernicus View Post
One thing I've often seen happen in Japan (though the Japan-based dopers haven't mentioned it here, so maybe it's not as common as I think) is that people near the door temporarily step out onto the platform, to allow other passengers to exit. The people on the platform wait, not only to allow passengers to get out, but to allow the people who were already on the train to get back in, before they start boarding.

It strikes me as very civilised.
Also, on one of the videos linked to above, you can see the people lining up to board, and the lines are all perfectly formed, perpendicular to the train and straight in two's. In Korea any semblance of a straight line is lost by about the 5th person, and it all turns into a large semi circular mass that is vying to cut in line. The Japanese really do have a very admirable sense of public courtesy.
  #41  
Old 05-01-2009, 12:33 AM
Whack-a-Mole Whack-a-Mole is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Posts: 18,622
Quote:
Originally Posted by jovan View Post
Well, at the very least, I did. After working in Osaka and doing the push-yourself-in technique I linked to every morning, I instinctively tried to do it in the Montreal subway. To me, the car didn't appear all that crowded and it was clear there was enough room to squeeze myself in. The other passengers didn't think so, however, and I was unceremoniously pushed back out with a what the fuck are you trying to do kind of look.
I guess they do get in trouble.

My GF is a native New Yorker having spent her whole life there till moving to Chicago three years ago. I mentioned this thread to her while riding home earlier tonight but I did not mention the question you responded to. On her own she offered the following anecdote (heavily paraphrased but the essentials are right...my commentary in brackets as I understood her meaning):

"I was riding home on the subway and the cars were packed [by our standards].

This little old [I got the sense "old" in this case was 50-60 and not grandma] Japanese woman forced her way onto the train and the doors closed. A few seconds later the doors re-opened and this big guy standing next to me shoved the lady out of the train, unceremoniously landing her on her ass on the platform.

The woman picked herself up, obviously shocked, and left [did not try to get back on the train]."


I asked my GF why she didn't shove the big guy off. She said it occurred to her but, well, he was big and my GF is petite. She tried to glare at him in disapproval but he studiously ignored my GF and other passengers.

Guess it shows how people from different societies can clash while doing what seems normal to them.
  #42  
Old 05-01-2009, 09:22 AM
scr4 scr4 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 13,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo Pin View Post
Also, on one of the videos linked to above, you can see the people lining up to board, and the lines are all perfectly formed, perpendicular to the train and straight in two's.
And the train station at the beginning of the line usually has markings for two sets of lines per door - the next train and the train after. If you're near the front of the line for the 2nd train, you can usually get a seat. My mother does this all the time - the chance to sit down and take a 40-minute nap is well worth the extra 5 minutes of waiting.
  #43  
Old 05-01-2009, 10:27 AM
JpnDude JpnDude is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 1,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
At one time they had trains with no seats during rush hours (the seats retract into the wall during rush hours), but I hear they are no longer in use.
Those train cars are still in use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
Modern Japanese commuter trains have at least 4 doors on each side of each car; some have 5, and the aforementioned seat-less trains had 6 doors on each side.
The 6-door train car that you linked to is one that features the retractable seats.
  #44  
Old 05-01-2009, 12:18 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Montréal, Québec
Posts: 8,772
Quote:
Originally Posted by hibernicus View Post
One thing I've often seen happen in Japan (though the Japan-based dopers haven't mentioned it here, so maybe it's not as common as I think) is that people near the door temporarily step out onto the platform, to allow other passengers to exit. The people on the platform wait, not only to allow passengers to get out, but to allow the people who were already on the train to get back in, before they start boarding.

It strikes me as very civilised.

That's pretty much what happens here in Montreal, in my experience. If there's no room to simply squeeze out, the people by the door will step off and stand to the side, and people on the platform usually let them back on first. There aren't really lineups on the platforms, though, and a lot of people will just cut ahead of others in order to get on. It annoys me deeply.

OTOH, we do line up for buses at bus stops, and I hear that isn't all that common elsewhere.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:18 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017