The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-10-2009, 03:13 PM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Keeping 2-liters of soda in refrigerator or at room temperature?

My bf and I have been embroiled in a debate. Well, not really, but we do disagree on where 2-liters of soda (or even smaller bottles like 20 oz bottles of tonic water) should be kept. He says that keeping soda at room temperature keeps it fizzier, whereas I say it should be kept cold. My thinking is that gas is more soluble in cold liquid, so it should stay cold to maximize solubility. He also drinks his with ice, and so my theory is that it foams when it hits the ice, and he thinks "ooh, bubbles!"

Any definitive answer?
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 05-10-2009, 03:24 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 55,212
If you mean long-term, when you're not about to drink it immediately, it doesn't matter: The room-temperature bottles will lose some carbonization, but will gain it back when it's cooled (as long as it's still got its original seal). If you mean immediately before drinking, then the correct answer is whichever one you like better. If your boyfriend likes the "ooh, bubbles" that he gets from his method, then he's doing it right. Note, though, that it'll go flat a lot quicker if it was opened warm than if it was opened cold.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-10-2009, 03:24 PM
atomicbadgerrace atomicbadgerrace is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
How long are you keeping the 2 liter around? That's probably going to be a bit of necessary information to decide which method is "best."

IME, keeping them out does make them taste fizzier if you've kept it open for more than a day or so. In my house, a 2 liter never lasts that long, and I just prefer to keep them in the fridge -- cold when I want it, without having to use ice.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-10-2009, 03:32 PM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
We'll say that we can open it hot or cold, depending on what preserves the most fizz (again, I'm assuming cold), and it'll be kept for a couple to few days. Is there a quantitative way to test this? I suppose we could check for presence of carbonic acid from the carbonation via pH, or use a balloon stretched over the neck of a smaller vessel and shake it?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-11-2009, 01:33 AM
MaceMan MaceMan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Once opened, you should definitely refrigerate it, since it will go flat a lot quicker at room temperature. Your boyfriend thinks the room temperature soda is "fizzier" because it loses the carbonation much quicker than cold soda. If you want the soda to remain carbonated, you should always keep it cold, even before opening it the first time, since it will lose a lot of carbonation very quickly.

Last edited by MaceMan; 05-11-2009 at 01:34 AM.. Reason: spelled lose "loose" and I hate that!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-11-2009, 08:55 AM
Philster Philster is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
I like my fizz IN the soda, so I keep it cold.

If one likes their fizz to be released from the soda, resulting in a 'head' (much like a beer), then keep it warm and let it hit the ice (which gives the soda plent of nucleation points to release the carbonation).

People who like 'flat' soda after a little bit of a fizzy/bubbly show are better off keeping it warm and pouring it over ice.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-11-2009, 10:34 AM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Hmm, I hate that I was right about this, because I can't exactly rub his face in it, because I'm not a jerk. I will celebrate my silent victory.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-11-2009, 02:01 PM
control-z control-z is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Let him come here and argue with us, you can tell him the people on the Internet said he was wrong!

My refrigerator isn't that full. I actually keep bottles filled with water in the empty spaces of my refrigerator, the logic is that water holds the cold better than air. Same with the freezer.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-11-2009, 03:03 PM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NY USA
Posts: 5,474
Who cares about how long the rest of the soda in the bottle will last?! If you pour warm soda over ice cubes yeah, you'll get pretty bubbles!

But the resulting drink will be, as we say in these parts, flatter than piss on a plate!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-11-2009, 03:18 PM
sqweels sqweels is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticbear View Post
Hmm, I hate that I was right about this, because I can't exactly rub his face in it, because I'm not a jerk. I will celebrate my silent victory.
Your boyfriend is obviously an idiot. My advice is to dump him.

But only if you're hot and live near me.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-11-2009, 03:24 PM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by sqweels View Post
Your boyfriend is obviously an idiot. My advice is to dump him.

But only if you're hot and live near me.
Well, I am, but I don't.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-26-2010, 08:57 PM
pmoseman pmoseman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Fighting Ignorance Constantly

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticbear View Post
Hmm, I hate that I was right about this, because I can't exactly rub his face in it, because I'm not a jerk. I will celebrate my silent victory.
How do you know you are right?

I haven't seen any actual evidence to support this one way or the other. I would guess slower molecular movement means more carbonation, but I am not familiar with the specific properties of carbonation.

The evidence is not here, anywhere, to go either way, just a lot of ideas.
Without evidence you would think that H20 shrinks as it freezes. It doesn't.
What someone needs to do is devise an experiment to test this out.

I heard something about nucleation points, but what does that have to do with the actual temperature of the soda? How do we know colder bottles when opened retain carbonation?

I think no process has been made toward a definitive answer. I think there are enough ideas to form a hypothesis.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.