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  #1  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:03 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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Why do I suck at pot roast?

Today was my second attempt at pot roast and unless something magical occurs in my crock pot soon, it will seem like another failure. Here's my procedure, perhaps someone can point out what went wrong?

I took a 2.5 lb, boneless, angus rump roast and sprinkled it with salt and pepper. Took a small, thin knife and poked a few holes in it and stuff garlic slivers in the holes. I took a hot, cast iron skillet with a bit of olive oil and browned the roast on all sides (maybe about 10 minute). I then took chopped onions, carrots, and celery and quickly sauteed them in the left-over oil in the pan.

After that, I poured the vegetables in the bottom of the crock pot, set the roast on top, and poured about 4 cups of beef stock in the crock pot. The liquid maybe went up half the meat, so I poured another bottle of beer in there and the liquid level went up about 3/4 of the meat. I added a bay leaf and a few twigs of thyme, set the crock-pot on high and put the lid on.

Fast forward to an hour and 45 minutes later. I decide to turn it over as I assume it still has a while to go, and upon trying to insert a fork into it, the roast seems incredibly tough. I forcefully tear a piece out of the gray mass and it's textured like a well-done steak. Why? I figured my first attempt failed due to the gas burner on my oven being unable to maintain a low-enough temp, hence me using the crock pot to cook this pot roast, but it doesn't seemed to have made any difference. Tips? Any way to salvage this pot roast? Pot roast is quickly becoming my white whale...
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  #2  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:06 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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105 minutes? My recipes all call for 8-10 hours before the roast is done. That roast is still almost raw.

I also think you are using way too much liquid. 1 bottle of beer and 1 cup of broth is about right.

Last edited by silenus; 05-18-2009 at 03:07 PM..
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  #3  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:09 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
105 minutes? My recipes all call for 8-10 hours before the roast is done. That roast is still almost raw.

I also think you are using way too much liquid. 1 bottle of beer and 1 cup of broth is about right.
Yeah, this is what was throwing me off. The crock pot pot roast recipes I all saw called for 7+ hours on low, or 5+ hours on high. Mine has been cooking for two hours and the temp is 160 F (just checked it).

Perhaps the problem was too much liquid indeed? I just assumed if it was in the crock pot it needed a good amount of liquid to keep from drying out...
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  #4  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:12 PM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
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I've never done a big roast and I don't have a crock pot, but when I stew beef cubes in my dutch oven it takes a minimum of 2.5 hours and 3.5 hours is better. Keep it going and taste again after an hour, hour and a half. It's supposed to get tough before it gets good.

Edit: in my experience, the total amount of liquid doesn't really matter, as long as it doesn't all evaporate, you'll be fine.

Last edited by Superfluous Parentheses; 05-18-2009 at 03:14 PM..
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  #5  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:14 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
Yeah, this is what was throwing me off. The crock pot pot roast recipes I all saw called for 7+ hours on low, or 5+ hours on high. Mine has been cooking for two hours and the temp is 160 F (just checked it).
If your meat is 160F, then it's just starting to enter the range in which the collagen starts rendering into gelatin (where the meat starts to get soft.) You wouldn't want to get such high temperatures with a lean meat free of connective tissue, but a tough cut like, say, chuck roast--which has decent amounts of fat and connective tissue, you want the roast to slowly render out the fat and collagen, giving you a moist cut of meat. I've never bothered checking the final temp of my pot roasts, but something like pork shoulder or beef brisket usually ends up at anywhere from 185-200 when it's fully soft.

Just be patient. It will start out tough and then get soft. When I do stovetop pot roast, I use chuck or brisket and cook over low heat for about 3-4 hours at a minimum. You just have to be aware of the science and what's going on with the meat. You need to slowly cook for much much past typical well-done temperatures to get that collagen (which is giving you the toughness when you taste it) to break down. And, trust me, it will break down.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-18-2009 at 03:17 PM..
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  #6  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:14 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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I hope that's what happens. I find it odd that the roast would be cooked through way before my vegetables would soften (tasted some celery and it's still crisp). I just turned the heat on my crock pot to low, but should I keep it on high? I measured the liquid's temperature to be about 180 when it was on the high setting.

Last edited by BrandonR; 05-18-2009 at 03:15 PM..
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  #7  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:20 PM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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I too have trouble with very tough roasts. Does putting too much water in a crock pot make the meat tough because you're boiling it? Also, I'd never heard of pre-braising the meat. Maybe that would help?
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Old 05-18-2009, 03:21 PM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
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Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
I hope that's what happens. I find it odd that the roast would be cooked through way before my vegetables would soften
Stewing meat doesn't just depend on the internal temperature - you've got to keep it at that temperature for quite a while; like I said, when I stew smallish beef cubes, it still takes about 3 hours to cook.
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  #9  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:22 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
I hope that's what happens. I find it odd that the roast would be cooked through way before my vegetables would soften (tasted some celery and it's still crisp). I just turned the heat on my crock pot to low, but should I keep it on high? I measured the liquid's temperature to be about 180 when it was on the high setting.
I don't use a crock pot, but when I do it on the stovetop, I'm guessing my temp is around 200. You're not going to ruin the roast by putting it on high, if 180 is the high setting for your crockpot. Personally, unless I were planning to be away from the house for most of the day, I'd set it on high.
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Old 05-18-2009, 03:23 PM
Beadalin Beadalin is offline
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Keep the setting on low from the beginning. More importantly, both for good results and for food safety, DO NOT open the crock pot and turn the meat or do anything else.

Lifting the lid dramatically influences the temperature in the pot, stops the heat and moisture from circulating the way they're supposed to, and significantly lengthens the amount of time it will take to finish cooking.

Trust the cooking time listed in the recipe and don't open the pot until the minimum time has elapsed.
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  #11  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:24 PM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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I do an average sized pot roast on top of the stove, and I will cook it for about 3 hours, and I add the veggies about half-way to 2/3 of the way through.

I sucked at pot roast because my mom always did it in the oven. Top o' the stove is waaaay more bettah.
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Old 05-18-2009, 03:27 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Lumpy View Post
I too have trouble with very tough roasts. Does putting too much water in a crock pot make the meat tough because you're boiling it? Also, I'd never heard of pre-braising the meat. Maybe that would help?
I really don't think it should make much of a difference. Just make sure you choose a cut that is appropriate for pot roasting. Leaner cuts with less connective tissue are just not going to break down the way a chuck shoulder or brisket will. I really don't think too much liquid will cause problems, because that's essentially the way stew is made, and my stews come out plenty tender, even though they're submerged in liquid. It's just getting the meat up to temp and holding it there for several hours as the collagen transforms to gelatin.
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Old 05-18-2009, 03:43 PM
redtail23 redtail23 is offline
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Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
I took a 2.5 lb, boneless, angus rump roast
IMO, here's your first problem. Rump roast does not make great pot roast. You want a chuck roast aka shoulder roast. Use the rumps for making roast beef.
Quote:
Fast forward to an hour and 45 minutes later.
Here's your second problem. Pot roast takes longer than that, especially in a crockpot. Cook it all day or overnight on low, don't try to rush it. Even if you turn it to high, it's still going to need at least a half-day or more.

My roomie often cooks potroast at a boil on the stovetop for several hours. It turns out fine, although not as good as mine. I cook mine in the oven at 200-250 for an entire day.

Don't worry too much about the liquid level. Crockpots tend to create liquid, so you've probably got more than you need, but it won't hurt anything.

Pot roast is very forgiving. Don't worry about turning it or messing with it. Just let it cook for a very long time and it will turn out OK.
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  #14  
Old 05-18-2009, 03:44 PM
redtail23 redtail23 is offline
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Originally Posted by Kalhoun View Post
I do an average sized pot roast on top of the stove, and I will cook it for about 3 hours, and I add the veggies about half-way to 2/3 of the way through.

I sucked at pot roast because my mom always did it in the oven. Top o' the stove is waaaay more bettah.
Oh, you are so, so wrong. Pot roast in the oven, done properly, is food of the gods. Stove-top pot roast is pretty good, mind you.

I loves pot roast.
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Old 05-18-2009, 03:55 PM
Shodan Shodan is offline
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Re: your temperature - is the liquid simmering slowly? If I set my crockpot on High, it would be way too hot. You want to simmer slowly for a long time - I do mine for a minimum of 6 hours, and overnight is better. And use a chuck roast. For pot roasting, the cheap cut is better.

But don't be in such a hurry. Good pot roast is a product of patience, and it is well worth the wait.

Regards,
Shodan
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Old 05-18-2009, 04:11 PM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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Originally Posted by redtail23 View Post
Oh, you are so, so wrong. Pot roast in the oven, done properly, is food of the gods. Stove-top pot roast is pretty good, mind you.

I loves pot roast.
Well, you must do something different than my mom did. Hers was never as good as mine. She was a good cook, but not so much for the standard comfort food fare.
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  #17  
Old 05-18-2009, 04:26 PM
delphica delphica is offline
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I have a pot roast question as well.

I do mine on the stove top. I have no problems with the tenderness ... it's always very nicely fork tender. But the taste ... I'm not happy with it. It's blah to me. It doesn't have any sort of a "meat" flavor. I'm using a beef broth/red wine combo for the liquid, and I would say the overall taste is very vaguely wine-like, but not especially tasty. I've got garlic, onions, carrots, and peppers in the pot as well - the garlic from the beginning and everything else added about 1 hour before serving.

Ideally, I would like it to have a very savory roast flavor. What am I doing wrong?
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  #18  
Old 05-18-2009, 04:33 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Originally Posted by delphica View Post
Ideally, I would like it to have a very savory roast flavor. What am I doing wrong?
Are you browning the roast first? This is a key step, as the browning process develops some killer flavors via the Malliard process.
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Old 05-18-2009, 04:38 PM
tarragon918 tarragon918 is offline
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Delphica, do you brown the meat first? Try browning it first, with flour, and seasonings; it will help seal in the flavor. One trick I use that makes for very tender meat, especially good with a tough cut, is to use leftover brewed coffee as part/all of the liquid.

Low and slow makes for the best, most tender pot roasts.
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Old 05-18-2009, 04:41 PM
delphica delphica is offline
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Originally Posted by tarragon918 View Post
Delphica, do you brown the meat first? Try browning it first, with flour, and seasonings; it will help seal in the flavor. One trick I use that makes for very tender meat, especially good with a tough cut, is to use leftover brewed coffee as part/all of the liquid.

Low and slow makes for the best, most tender pot roasts.
Yes, I am browning it first in olive oil with flour, salt and pepper. The coffee is an interesting suggestion!
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  #21  
Old 05-18-2009, 04:47 PM
teela brown teela brown is online now
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I also vote down using rump or round as a pot roast. It's a fibrous, uber-lean cut and can stay tough and dry forever. Next time, get shoulder (chuck) or brisket. Simmer it at a low temp for a long time, like at least three hours. My rule is three hours and twenty minutes at 320 degrees, and I like to do it in the oven in a covered enameled cast iron dutch oven.
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Old 05-18-2009, 05:03 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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I take the opposite approach, I use my pressure cooker, and (after browning it) I cook it for about 45-90 minutes (depending on size) in that, with lots of carrots, potatoes, quartered onions, and whole garlic cloves strewn around it.

Let the pressure cooker cool down for another 45-90 minutes. Pull out the meat, veggies. Pull apart the meat (an easy task), and let it continue to soak in some of the juice.

Get rid of most of the fat, thicken the rest of the juice with cornstarch or arrowroot.

Serve.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 05-18-2009 at 05:04 PM..
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  #23  
Old 05-18-2009, 06:17 PM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
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Another thing, rump roast is a very lean and particularly "stringy" muscle with much longer fibers, as compared to a cross cut, chuck roast (tradiitional pot roast cut). After that short of a cooking time it will seem very, very, toigh as it has contracted in cooking. Give it several hours to braise and it will relax and get very tender, then it will be fine, I guarantee.

Re: Liquid

It does seem like a bit much liquid ingredients- one must also consider when taking into account the roast, that it will exude from itself upwards of a 1/2 cup of drippings depending on size and fat content.
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Old 05-18-2009, 08:06 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Here is what my wife does, and it works wonderfully:

1 3-5 lb Pot Roast(my wife uses Beef Round Rump Roast)

2 cans cream of mushroom soup

1 package of dried onion soup mix

1 1/4 cups water


1. Cut the roast in half.

2. Put it in the crock pot.

3. Pour the mixture of cream of mushroom soup and dry onion soup and water(pre-mixed) over the roast.

4. Cook it on high setting for 3-4 hours or on Low for 8 hours.

5. Turn it over once in awhile.

It comes out perfect every time.

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Old 05-18-2009, 09:00 PM
Hockey Monkey Hockey Monkey is offline
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Stop opening the crock pot. Don't worry about the temperature. Cook it at least 6 hours on low. Pot roast cannot be rushed. I don't add the veggies till the last half of cooking. Use chuck roast. Brown it. Be patient.
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  #26  
Old 05-18-2009, 09:10 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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I use chuck roast in the oven about 1/2 covered in water with a pack of dry au jus mix. Add whatever veggies you like. Cover the pan or casserole dish with tin foil. Cook on 300 for 3 hours and remove the foil and continue cooking for another hour.

4 hours of simmering is as fast as you are going to get a decent pot roast.
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  #27  
Old 05-18-2009, 09:10 PM
DMark DMark is offline
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1. Buy largest, cheapest roast you can get.
2. Put in crock pot.
3. Add veggies (small potatoes, celery, carrots) if you wish.
4. Put entire package of dried onion soup on top.
5. Pour in maybe one small can of beef broth - no more!
6. Turn on low and forget about it for 10 to 12 hours, and DO NOT LIFT LID, PERIOD!

We have been doing that for years - never had a bad roast - meat falls apart with barely a touch of knife or fork and the whole house smells great those last few hours! I will usually prepare it all and put in fridge, then put it in crock pot and turn it on before going to bed (midnight or so)...then it is ready for lunch the next day.

We always get the biggest cut of roast we can find, as when you slice it thin after it cools, it makes great roast beef sandwiches!
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  #28  
Old 05-18-2009, 10:34 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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Thanks for all the tips everyone. After five hours it did indeed magically transform into a tender, moist pot roast. Yum!
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  #29  
Old 05-18-2009, 10:34 PM
Catfood Purrito Catfood Purrito is offline
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Mine is well loved by everybody who has tried it. I use a 2-3 pound roast, whatever's cheap, brown it, place in the crock pot with a couple teaspoons beef Better Than Bouillon (comes in a jar next to bouillon cubes and whatnot), a couple tablespoons Worcestershire sauce, around 1/3 cup soy sauce, a bay leaf, a handful of whole peppercorns, a couple tablespoons of dried minced garlic, a tablespoon or so of dried rosemary, and enough water to almost cover the roast. Cook on low around 7 or 8 hours. All amounts are approximate, I don't really measure. I know I have it right when it smells AWESOME in a few hours.
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  #30  
Old 05-18-2009, 10:52 PM
Critical1 Critical1 is offline
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I have cooked as much as 8 pounds of beef in a 6.5 quart crock pot with good results.

I always cover the meat in liquid, in a crock pot that isnt necessary but..
I put the meat in the night before and let things sit over night in the fridge so I like to be sure nothing gets dried out.
(note you cant add veggies when you have that much meat)

for smaller amounts I add taters/carrots/onion to the crock pot to cover the base, add browned meat, then add more veggies to surround and perhaps cover the meat.


one huge tip for those of you who like your pot roast. Save some of the broth, with the amount of liquid I use I save maybe a pint or more and freeze it, then with the next roast I use that for the broth and so on. I am not sure how many times the current batch has been used to flavor pot roast but I can tell you its essentially liquid beefy goodness, as soon as that stuff heats up the house smells amazing. also you can use the extra broth for french dips or pretty much anything you want more beef flavor for.
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  #31  
Old 05-18-2009, 11:40 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahaloth View Post
Here is what my wife does, and it works wonderfully:

1 3-5 lb Pot Roast(my wife uses Beef Round Rump Roast)

2 cans cream of mushroom soup

1 package of dried onion soup mix

1 1/4 cups water


1. Cut the roast in half.

2. Put it in the crock pot.

3. Pour the mixture of cream of mushroom soup and dry onion soup and water(pre-mixed) over the roast.

4. Cook it on high setting for 3-4 hours or on Low for 8 hours.

5. Turn it over once in awhile.

It comes out perfect every time.

I was going to recommend a similar recipe. It's incredibly easy, and has won raves whenever I've made it.

I use a tri-tip roast and brown a bit on each side; otherwise just dump everything into the Crock-Pot and let it cook, preferably on low for at least 8 hours. If you like, put a few slices of potato, carrot, and celery in during the last hour or so of cooking. It's amazingly good for very little effort.
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Old 05-18-2009, 11:42 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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Oddly enough I did one tonight. I use an enameled Dutch Oven in the oven ( duh ) at 325 for roughly an hour per lb of roast, plus a smidge. This one was 4.47 lbs and was in for about 4 3/4 hours - came out perfect, fall-apart tender and smothered in gravy.

Dredged in flour/fresh-ground blackpepper/murray river salt and browned in unsalted butter on the stovetop. For the liquid I use the old familiar can of mushroom soup/onion soup packet method mixed with white wine ( cheap Chilean Chardonnay ) - about two cups to start, another 1-2 cups when adding the veggies for the last hour or so ( carrots, turnips and yukon gold potatoes this go around ). I like lots of gravy .

I've never had a fail yet with the above method. Tender, moist and delicious. But I do second ( or twentieth ) always sticking with a good chuck roast - I never use anything else for pot roast. A dry pot roast is an abomination.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 05-18-2009 at 11:43 PM..
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  #33  
Old 05-19-2009, 01:59 AM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
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My secret is the gravy. I always do a medium roast for several hours at 350F in the oven.

Add some Kitchen Bouquet,to the Drippings and the 3/4 cup of water that you add to the well seasoned roas at start. Garlic Salt, Salt and Pepper... The drippings form and scrape, some flour and water shaken en jar, reduced while I'm making the mashed. A bit of Salt and Pepper to season... Very simple but well cooked gravy. No hint of the artificial as is often too prominent in American gravy.

Last edited by devilsknew; 05-19-2009 at 02:03 AM..
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Old 05-19-2009, 02:25 AM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
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OK, I wan't entirely honest, but this is my duality. I explain, but never give away my entire secret recipe. In this case, it is potato water... you must add the starchy water of the boiled potatoes to the gravy. It just doesn't have the coherence, body, shine, or flava, if not.

Usually, about a 1/2 cup to a cup of potato water. I like aromatics for flavor in my gravy. Never Garlic cloves, just the powder. Carrots and potatoes, sometimes, onions, never celery.

Last edited by devilsknew; 05-19-2009 at 02:29 AM..
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  #35  
Old 05-19-2009, 06:19 AM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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Originally Posted by delphica View Post
I have a pot roast question as well.

I do mine on the stove top. I have no problems with the tenderness ... it's always very nicely fork tender. But the taste ... I'm not happy with it. It's blah to me. It doesn't have any sort of a "meat" flavor. I'm using a beef broth/red wine combo for the liquid, and I would say the overall taste is very vaguely wine-like, but not especially tasty. I've got garlic, onions, carrots, and peppers in the pot as well - the garlic from the beginning and everything else added about 1 hour before serving.

Ideally, I would like it to have a very savory roast flavor. What am I doing wrong?
Try a little Kitchen Bouquet. I love that stuff!! But yours sounds positively divine.
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  #36  
Old 05-19-2009, 09:26 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by tarragon918 View Post
Delphica, do you brown the meat first? Try browning it first, with flour, and seasonings; it will help seal in the flavor.
It's not so much sealing in flavor as it is creating flavor with the browning (which may or may not technically be a Maillard reaction, depending on what source you consult. I've always called it a Maillard reaction, but Wikipedia notes that it techically isn't, since it doesn't involve a reaction with a reducing sugar [although the dredging flour may make this a maillard reaction, after all]. Doesn't really matter. Just remember that brown = meaty flavor.)

Also, make sure to give the meat a good brown. Some people I've noticed are a little timid about browning and get the meat to more of a gray state. Get the pan real hot, and give it a nice crusty sear, something like this. Personally, I don't flour the meat, I get my pan scorching hot, pat dry the meat, and sear away. If you're using flour, you're not going to want to get quite as hot as your flour will burn.

But I'm guessing you have a pretty good sear, given that you are using flour. I don't see any reason why your pot roast should be anything less than beefy. Are you using enough salt? Lack of salt will often make a soup, stew, or roast taste "less meaty" than it should. Are you using too much liquid and diluting the flavor of the gravy? You could also try a bouquet garni (a sachet of herbs such as thyme, parsley, and bay leaves tied together either with string or the parsley stem) to add a little savory herb flavor to the roast. You could put a sprig of rosemary into your bouquet garni, as well, as it goes well with the beef.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-19-2009 at 09:28 AM..
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  #37  
Old 05-19-2009, 09:43 AM
Labrador Deceiver Labrador Deceiver is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post

Also, make sure to give the meat a good brown. Some people I've noticed are a little timid about browning and get the meat to more of a gray state. Get the pan real hot, and give it a nice crusty sear, something like this. Personally, I don't flour the meat, I get my pan scorching hot, pat dry the meat, and sear away. If you're using flour, you're not going to want to get quite as hot as your flour will burn.
An old Julia Child trick is to add the flour after browning, but before adding the liquid. Place it in a relatively fast oven (450 degrees, maybe) for about 4 or 5 minutes, stir, then place back in the oven for 4 or 5 minutes. This will begin to brown the flour. Remove the pot, reduce the oven to 300, add the liquid & stir, place a lid on it, and pop it back into the oven for several hours.

That's how Beef Bourguinon is done in Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Excellent method.
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  #38  
Old 05-19-2009, 11:51 AM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Get rid of most of the fat, thicken the rest of the juice with cornstarch or arrowroot.
Nope. Pulverized gingersnaps.
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  #39  
Old 05-19-2009, 12:23 PM
Shodan Shodan is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Moto View Post
Nope. Pulverized gingersnaps.
Really? Whoa.

Regards,
Shodan
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  #40  
Old 05-19-2009, 12:29 PM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Yeah...I live right out there on the edge.

Actually gingersnap gravy is pretty common - you see it a lot in German cooking, and it is the thickener for the sauerbraten gravy. Give it a whirl.
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  #41  
Old 05-19-2009, 12:30 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Really? Whoa.
Really. I've tried this trick, and it gives a real nice little something different to the gravy.
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  #42  
Old 05-19-2009, 12:33 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
I take the opposite approach, I use my pressure cooker...
I used to do it this way. For years, I made amazing pot roasts in amazingly short times (it's all relative).

But then I lost the art.

I have no idea how it happened ... one day, it came out overdone. Then again. Maybe a third time. Since then I've been afraid to go back, considering it one of those how'd-they-do-it mysteries, like the Pyramids of Giza. I'll try again.




As for roasts, is there a reason everyone is using (or appearing to use) boneless roasts? It can be hard to find a bone-in chuck, but I find the flavoring and texture to be better than boneless. Am I part Ogre?
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Old 05-19-2009, 12:56 PM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Originally Posted by Rhythmdvl View Post
As for roasts, is there a reason everyone is using (or appearing to use) boneless roasts? It can be hard to find a bone-in chuck, but I find the flavoring and texture to be better than boneless. Am I part Ogre?
My preference is the traditional "7-bone" chuck steak for pot roast. But I'll buy a boneless chuck if it is on sale.

After all, I have to feed five cheaply.

Incidentally, I use the pressure cooker to make swiss steak quickly - the pressure breaks down the tough cubed steak and it turns out very nice indeed. And the best part is it only takes about 45 minutes vice 2.5 hours in the oven.
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  #44  
Old 05-19-2009, 02:29 PM
Shodan Shodan is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr. Moto View Post
Yeah...I live right out there on the edge.

Actually gingersnap gravy is pretty common - you see it a lot in German cooking, and it is the thickener for the sauerbraten gravy. Give it a whirl.
I got a chuck in the freezer - now I gotta try it. Thanks!

Regards,
Shodan
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  #45  
Old 05-19-2009, 02:54 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moto View Post
Nope. Pulverized gingersnaps.
Ja, ja, ven I vant der sauerbraten, I do dat.

Mit spaetzle.
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  #46  
Old 05-19-2009, 03:03 PM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
I got a chuck in the freezer - now I gotta try it. Thanks!

Regards,
Shodan
No problem. The cooking threads are one place few argue with me.

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  #47  
Old 05-19-2009, 03:32 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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I sometimes do pot roast in the pressure cooker, and it turns out divine. Also includes whole red potatoes and carrots n' parsnips for mashing - a whole meat-and-potatoes dinner in one pot! I can't find my recipe just now, though.
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  #48  
Old 05-19-2009, 04:15 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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While on the topic, what's the best way to make a nice gravy for the pot roast? Is it as simple as reducing some of the liquid the roast cooked in? Maybe add some a cornstarch slurry as a thickener?
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  #49  
Old 05-19-2009, 04:18 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
While on the topic, what's the best way to make a nice gravy for the pot roast? Is it as simple as reducing some of the liquid the roast cooked in? Maybe add some a cornstarch slurry as a thickener?
"Pay Attention," Ginger snapped.



Last edited by Rhythmdvl; 05-19-2009 at 04:19 PM.. Reason: hit submit too swiftly
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  #50  
Old 05-19-2009, 04:20 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Post #22, but try Mr. Moto's gingersnap variation sometime.
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