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  #1  
Old 06-09-2009, 06:40 PM
Evil Economist Evil Economist is offline
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Best way to cool down: hot or cold showers?

I go to the gym during the work day, which means I break into a heavy sweat and then need to cool down in the shower before going back to work. I have limited time, which means I need to go about this in the most efficient way.

I've tried taking cold showers, but it seems like I break back into a sweat as soon as I get out. I thought hot showers might work better--the idea being to trick my body into thinking that outside the shower was cool by comparison, so that there was no need to sweat--not sure if this is a valid line of reasoning or not.

Any ideas as to which would be better? maybe split the difference and take a warm shower. Start with cold shower and then increase the temperature? Someone has to have spent some time thinking about this kind of stuff.
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  #2  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:07 PM
Huerta88 Huerta88 is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Economist View Post
I go to the gym during the work day, which means I break into a heavy sweat and then need to cool down in the shower before going back to work. I have limited time, which means I need to go about this in the most efficient way.

I've tried taking cold showers, but it seems like I break back into a sweat as soon as I get out. I thought hot showers might work better--the idea being to trick my body into thinking that outside the shower was cool by comparison, so that there was no need to sweat--not sure if this is a valid line of reasoning or not.

Any ideas as to which would be better? maybe split the difference and take a warm shower. Start with cold shower and then increase the temperature? Someone has to have spent some time thinking about this kind of stuff.
A hot shower is almost certainly not going to do you any good. I often try to seek out hot tubs or steam room/saunas while traveling, if the hotel has them (more do in Asia and Europe) because I'm usually super stiff from flying (or from hitting the hotel gym which I often do out of boredom). I continue to sweat and remain flushed for many minutes after getting out of the hot water, even well after I am dressed. YMMV, but what I have found to work is the super cold shower, for several minutes, making sure to soak your head and the back of your neck (either I made this up or I didn't, but the nerves that alert you that you are losing heat and that thus the body should correct downward its core metabolic activity to reserve your energy, as in a plunge into the ocean, seem to be in that area). It's kind of hard to force yourself to do it, and you'll gasp (another automatic reaction) and wince, but if you run cool water over those areas for two or three minutes, you'll be much less flushed and sweaty when you get out, IME.
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:13 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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It takes me a long time to cool down after aerobic exercise, no matter what kind of shower I take. So I just wait 20 minutes or so until I stop sweating before I shower (I can't really work out at lunchtime). I suspect that the muscles continue to generate excess heat even after the exercise is done and so even if you could cool your surface down instantaneously, the furnace will still be stoked for a while.

But heat loss is fastest with cold water. There's no real logic to using hot water to cool off faster (unless you are making ice cubes )
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  #4  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:17 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is offline
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Wouldn't an overly-cold shower cause the blood vessels in your skin to reflexively constrict in an effort to preserve your core temp? Seems to me if you're trying to shed body heat in a hurry, you're better off going with a lukewarm shower that maybe sloooowly gets colder and as Huerta suggests, make sure the major blood vessels in your head and neck get their share.
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  #5  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:23 PM
Contrapuntal Contrapuntal is offline
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Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
Wouldn't an overly-cold shower cause the blood vessels in your skin to reflexively constrict in an effort to preserve your core temp? Seems to me if you're trying to shed body heat in a hurry, you're better off going with a lukewarm shower that maybe sloooowly gets colder and as Huerta suggests, make sure the major blood vessels in your head and neck get their share.
I think that's the best way. Hot shower (for cleanliness) followed by warm followed by cold. That always works for me, and I tend to sweat it up quite a bit when I get exercised.

Last edited by Contrapuntal; 06-09-2009 at 07:24 PM..
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  #6  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:37 PM
Evil Economist Evil Economist is offline
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Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
Wouldn't an overly-cold shower cause the blood vessels in your skin to reflexively constrict in an effort to preserve your core temp?
This is what I'm worried about. If I took a cold shower, wouldn't my body start trying to conserve/create heat? Maybe the ramping down in temperature is the best way, but would it be best to end with a warm temperature?
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  #7  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:42 PM
Contrapuntal Contrapuntal is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Economist View Post
This is what I'm worried about. If I took a cold shower, wouldn't my body start trying to conserve/create heat?
I don't know. Does turning down the thermostat in your house make you hotter?
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:48 PM
Evil Economist Evil Economist is offline
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Originally Posted by Contrapuntal View Post
I don't know. Does turning down the thermostat in your house make you hotter?
I get your point, but would you sweat more if you had the thermostat set low or moderate before you walked out into a hot day? Would your body's adaptations to the low temperature make you sweat more? If not, I guess my question has been answered.
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  #9  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:53 PM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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You're bodies thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your core temp, but rather your surface temp. Rapidly transitioning to too cold is likely to trigger heat conserving mechanisms
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  #10  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:58 PM
Evil Economist Evil Economist is offline
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Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post
You're bodies thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your core temp, but rather your surface temp. Rapidly transitioning to too cold is likely to trigger heat conserving mechanisms
In this case the best cool-down method is to take a cold shower but finish up with hot water, to get surface temperature up?
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  #11  
Old 06-09-2009, 08:04 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Originally Posted by Contrapuntal View Post
I don't know. Does turning down the thermostat in your house make you hotter?
A cold shower is a relatively temporary situation; an airconditioned house something you'd be less likely to step into and out of in an attempt to cool off.
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  #12  
Old 06-09-2009, 08:24 PM
USCDiver USCDiver is offline
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Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post
You're bodies thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your core temp, but rather your surface temp. Rapidly transitioning to too cold is likely to trigger heat conserving mechanisms
Do you have any evidence of this? The 'thermostat' is located deep in the brain in the hypothalamus.
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  #13  
Old 06-09-2009, 09:54 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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When a child has a high fever they throw him in a tub of ice.

I recall once when I had a summer cold and fever, I went to Lake Michigan and sat in the lake and my fever fell right down.

Like most things in life, it is gonna vary from person to person. My only suggestion is take a cold shower, and see. Then the next day take a cold shower and turn handle of the hot water one quarter way on. (Or however you'd work it if the spout only has one turn handle.)

Then report back to us what you find. And don't forget the camera phone so we can have pictures to verify your data
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  #14  
Old 06-10-2009, 01:28 AM
Zoe Zoe is offline
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Trust me. You cool off best with a temperate shower. Not too hot. Not too cold. That's the kind of stuff we used to learn in Home Economics in the 1950s. Honest.
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  #15  
Old 06-10-2009, 02:23 AM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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Originally Posted by USCDiver View Post
Do you have any evidence of this? The 'thermostat' is located deep in the brain in the hypothalamus.
If the skin temperature drops below 37°C a variety of responses are initiated to conserve the heat in the body and to increase heat production.
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...eatreg.html#c1



Body temperature is regulated by a system of sensors and controllers across the body. The brain receives signals regarding body temperature from the nerves in the skin and the blood. These signals go to the hypothalamus, which coordinates thermoregulation in the body. Signals from the hypothalamus control the sympathetic nervous system, which affects vasoconstriction, metabolism, shivering, sweating, and hormonal controls over temperature
http://www.biologyreference.com/Ta-V...egulation.html
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  #16  
Old 06-10-2009, 05:24 AM
Blake Blake is offline
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Outliern you are completely misunderstanding your references. They are just saying that that the body regulates its temperature primarily via the skin. That's not surprising since that's where it has the most contact with the external world. In order to achieve that regulation there are of course temperature sensors in the skin itself.

What they are not saying is that the body's “thermostat”, ie the primary switch that regulates temperature, is in the skin. In fact one of your own references states explicitly that “The hypothalmus contains … the control mechanisms [and] the key temperature sensors”

In more detail, the first reference is referring strictly to the control of sweating. And it notes that the whole process is under the control of the hypothalamus. The skin sensors control only the amount of sweat produced, not the temperature of the body itself. The second reference merely notes that there are temperature sensors in the skin associated with temperature regulation, but once again it notes the whole process is under the control of the hypothalamus.

I can go into a lot more detail on this subject if you’d like, but for now I just want to stress that the body definitely does not regulate temperature based on skin temperature. Thank Og, since skin temperature routinely fluctuates wildly minute to minute, but your systems will start to crash if the core temperature varies by more than ~3^oC.

There’s a reason why body temperature is taken in the mouth, anus or ear rather than being held between the skin in the fingers: it’s because skin temperature varies widely and rapidly, whereas core temperature is stable except under condition s of ill health. If the body keyed its temperature to skin temperature then you would start shivering when you skin temperature dropped below 37^oC, which occurs at an air temperature of about 22o^C. Similarly when you entered the sun and your skin temperature reached 38o^C you’d start sweating, even tough air temperature was only15o^C.

Just to keep things clear: the overriding control of body temperature is undertaken by the hypothalamus, and the key temperature sensors are all located in the hypothalamus. The skin contains minor sensors that assist in fine regulation heat dispersal/retention when the hypothalamus seems that to be necessary. But in now way s the body’s temperature keyed to the skin temperature. That would be rapidly fatal because skin temperature fluctuates precisely because it is the site of heat dispersal/absorption.
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  #17  
Old 06-10-2009, 05:36 AM
Blake Blake is offline
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Originally Posted by Huerta88 View Post
...making sure to soak your head and the back of your neck (either I made this up or I didn't, but the nerves that alert you that you are losing heat and that thus the body should correct downward its core metabolic activity to reserve your energy..... seem to be in that area).
You may have made it up, but you're right, kinda.

It's not the nerves, it's the blood flow. The blood flow from that areas runs straight to the the brain which contains... the hypothalmus. Cool the blood and the brain registers that the core temperature has fallen. Added to that the body can't restrict blood flow to the brain as it can to other locations, so if you can keep that area cool you will keep losing heat, whereas in other areas the body will simply shut down the blood supply.

This is one of the crucial design points in modern life vests: keeping the head and back of the neck clear of the water. Pre WWII life vests used to basically float people of their backs on the assumption that they were more stable and less prone to drown, but that design caused a lot of deaths from hypothermia.

The sad part is that this fact was discovered by Nazi scientists by immersing human victims in freezing water wearing various deigns of life vests and seeing who died first.
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Old 06-10-2009, 06:09 AM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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Dude, calm down. I never said that the hypothalamus wasn't the control center for temp regulation, merely that it uses data from the skin to decide what to do. the skin provides real time information about the significant changes to the environment, and, in fact, increases and decreases the sensitivity of the central sensors in the hypothalamus. Think about it, it would be pretty stupid to have to wait until your core temp was falling to begin heat conserving measures.

http://www3.fhs.usyd.edu.au/bio/home...odyTC_Pg04.htm

stepping into a cold shower can trigger this even before you've actually cooled off from your workout, so unless you're planning on hanging out in the shower for awhile, you're probably better off with cool water that won't cause reduced blood flow to the surface.
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Old 06-10-2009, 06:59 AM
Blake Blake is offline
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Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post
Dude, calm down. I never said that the hypothalamus wasn't the control center for temp regulation, merely that it uses data from the skin to decide what to do.
Err, no. You actually said "You're bodies thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your core temp, but rather your surface temp."

That is flat out wrong. Your body's thermostat indisputably does key off your core temp. All your own references state that clearly

And your body's thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your skin temp. Your skin temperature only serves as fine control for hypothalamus dictated temperature regulation.

Quote:
the skin provides real time information about the significant changes to the environment, and, in fact, increases and decreases the sensitivity of the central sensors in the hypothalamus. Think about it, it would be pretty stupid to have to wait until your core temp was falling to begin heat conserving measures.

Once again you have completely failed to understand your own refrerence. the reference is not saying that body temperature is regulated by skin temperature as you claimed. It is saying that body temperature is regulated in a minor way by the temperature of the external environment, and that the senors that detect external environmental conditions are in the skin.


Like I said, I'm happy to explain any of this too you in detail, preferably in another thread, but for the purposes of this thread we need ot clear up the misconceptions you've raised:

The overriding control of body temperature is undertaken by the hypothalamus, not the skin.

The key temperature sensors are all located in the hypothalamus, not the skin.

The skin contains minor sensors that assist in fine regulation heat dispersal/retention when the hypothalamus seems that to be necessary, but these are not key sensors and their effect is governed by the hypothalamus.

The skin also contains sensors that detect temperature of the external environment but these operate regardless of skin temperature. Doesn't matter if the skin is at 39^0C or at at 27o^C. The only information they act upon is external environmental temperature. So once again temperature regulation is not being governed by skin temperature.

Quote:
stepping into a cold shower can trigger this even before you've actually cooled off from your workout, so unless you're planning on hanging out in the shower for awhile, you're probably better off with cool water that won't cause reduced blood flow to the surface.
I agree with that, but that is radically different form your claims that it is in any way related to skin temperature. It isn't. It is related solely to water temperature.
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  #20  
Old 06-10-2009, 08:36 AM
misling misling is offline
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Anecdote only: by trial and error, I've found that what works best for me is a shower that feels cool to my skin (not cold). As I cool down in the shower, the water that started out feeling cool starts feeling warm, and I turn it down a little cooler.
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  #21  
Old 06-10-2009, 09:41 AM
Philster Philster is offline
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All the time you take changing shower temps and worrying about shower temps should be spent like this:

Relaxing. Take a couple of minutes, maybe a few, and do some really deep relaxing. Big breaths...bring the heart rate down... and just get yourself settled. Then take a nice, comfortable shower... warm enough to relax you, but not hot.

Your hear rate is your obstacle, not the shower temps. Avoiding hot showers is important for another reason, and indirectly relates to your problem: hot showers don't help inflammation, and inflammation requires more blood flow.

Relax. Nice shower... not too hot.

Last edited by Philster; 06-10-2009 at 09:42 AM..
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  #22  
Old 06-10-2009, 09:46 AM
Mosier Mosier is offline
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Originally Posted by USCDiver View Post
Do you have any evidence of this? The 'thermostat' is located deep in the brain in the hypothalamus.
Your skin has built-in ways to shed or conserve heat independent of the hypothalamus.
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  #23  
Old 06-10-2009, 10:30 AM
Contrapuntal Contrapuntal is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Economist View Post
I get your point, but would you sweat more if you had the thermostat set low or moderate before you walked out into a hot day? Would your body's adaptations to the low temperature make you sweat more? If not, I guess my question has been answered.
It seems to me that sweating is a response to being too hot. It is an attempt by the body, via evaporation, to cool itself down. Shivering is the response to being too cold. I have never heard of sweating as a response to being too cold, but I could be wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
A cold shower is a relatively temporary situation; an airconditioned house something you'd be less likely to step into and out of in an attempt to cool off.
I'm not sure I follow. I used to work outdoors in high heat a lot. We took every chance we could to take advantage of a little A/C.
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  #24  
Old 06-10-2009, 12:01 PM
dracoi dracoi is offline
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Regardless of internal thermostat issues, part of the problem is that the body does continue to metabolize at a high rate following exercise. Muscles have a small store of glycogen that has to be replaced either from blood sugar or by pulling glycogen out of the liver into the bloodstream. There may even be some metabolism of fat stores. A certain amount of metabolic byproducts need to be cleaned up. Cell growth has been encouraged and there may be some tissue damage to repair. So even if you got your core temperature down below normal, all this extra activity is likely to put it back up over normal before your body finishes "housekeeping."

I'd say to go with a cold shower, but try to give yourself an extra 20-30 minutes (or even an hour) before you have to be somewhere where sweating isn't good.
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  #25  
Old 06-10-2009, 12:15 PM
constanze constanze is offline
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I agree with the lukewarm shower. A cold shower triggers the heat conservation, a really hot shower excites the metabolic rate. I feel most refreshed in the summer after a quick rinse off with a luke-warm shower.

If you prefer a cold shower, the trick is to quickly blast the soles of your feet with warm water at the very end. If your feet are warm, your body will realize it doesn't have to conserve heat. No I don't have a cite, but that's posted in all Saunas and what Sauna masters learn. (If you go to the Sauna and after dipping into the cold water don't put your feet into warm water, you can get a heat shock and collapse, when your body switches to heat conservation from the cold water shock, but has too much heat inside).

Last edited by constanze; 06-10-2009 at 12:15 PM..
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  #26  
Old 06-10-2009, 12:20 PM
ethelbert ethelbert is offline
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The only time that I could avoid sweating for 30 minutes after a heavy workout was if I had a pool available to take a quick dip. The temperature of the shower made no difference except that cold shower just pissed me off.
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  #27  
Old 06-10-2009, 01:58 PM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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Look Blake, I don't want to get into a pissing contest here, but you're being really pendantic.


Quote:
Err, no. You actually said "You're bodies thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your core temp, but rather your surface temp."
Yes I did say that and I was wrong to say it. Just a practical bias. In heat stroke we don't immerse in ice water because it can induce counterproductive shivering.

Also, note that I said surface temp, not skin temp, although from a practical perspective I'm not conceding that it's an important distinction.

Quote:
And your body's thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your skin temp. Your skin temperature only serves as fine control for hypothalamus dictated temperature regulation.
Now this is just flat wrong, each one of my cites states that the brain recieves signals regarding the body temp from nerves in the skin, or that when skin temp drops heat conservation begins.


Quote:
The overriding control of body temperature is undertaken by the hypothalamus, not the skin.
never said otherwise.


Quote:
The skin also contains sensors that detect temperature of the external environment but these operate regardless of skin temperature. Doesn't matter if the skin is at 39^0C or at at 27o^C. The only information they act upon is external environmental temperature. So once again temperature regulation is not being governed by skin temperature.
This is directly contradicted by one of my cites.


Quote:
I agree with that, but that is radically different form your claims that it is in any way related to skin temperature. It isn't. It is related solely to water temperature.
Umm, not seeing your use of the word radically here, it's not like the nerves are directly assessing the water temp. They're only inferring it from the change in the temp of the tissue surrounding the nerve endings.

Last edited by outlierrn; 06-10-2009 at 01:58 PM..
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  #28  
Old 06-10-2009, 02:51 PM
sailor sailor is offline
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There is no way, shower or no shower, to instantly alter the metabolic rate. It takes 15~30 mins to start sweating after you start exercising and it will take 15~30 mins to stop sweating after you stop exercising, no matter what you do. And extremely hot or cold showers will probably do more harm than good.
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  #29  
Old 06-10-2009, 06:52 PM
Blake Blake is offline
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Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post
Yes I did say that and I was wrong to say it.
Good that’s all that needed clarifying. If you had said this in response to the first requests for cites rather than repeating the claim there would could have avoided this. We all post erroneous statements due to incorrect wording. The important thing in GQ is to clear up the facts.

[qiuote]Now this is just flat wrong[/quote]

No, it's not. It's perfectly correct

Quote:
each one of my cites states that the brain recieves signals regarding the body temp from nerves in the skin...

A point that I have stressed repeatedly.

Quote:
...or that when skin temp drops heat conservation begins.

No. None of your references say any such thing. Once again you have totally misinterpreted them
In this case you have totally misinterpreted where one reference says that
"Under control of these [hypothalmic] mechanisms... If the skin temperature drops below 37°C a variety of responses are initiated to conserve the heat."

Note that his reference, that you supplied, is stating that the skin temperature only serves as fine control for hypothalamus dictated temperature regulation.


Quote:
This is directly contradicted by one of my cites.
Sigh. No, it isn't.

Look, outlierrn, I can go into any degree of detail on this subject that you like, referencing any level of material form high school textbooks to the latest lancet articles. I have no problem doing so.

But please, don't just keep saying that your references say something when they do not. I've already explained the mechanisms and pointed out what is actually said. Nowhere do those references contradict the position of mainstream science on the role of the skin in temperature regulation.

Quote:
Umm, not seeing your use of the word radically here, it's not like the nerves are directly assessing the water temp. They're only inferring it from the change in the temp of the tissue surrounding the nerve endings.
Sigh. I know you don’t see the difference. That’s the problem.
I can explain this too you if you like, including experiments that you can do for yourself. So do you want me to?
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  #30  
Old 06-10-2009, 07:35 PM
Blake Blake is offline
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Originally Posted by sailor View Post
There is no way, shower or no shower, to instantly alter the metabolic rate.
The body can initiates a metabolic responses to changes in air temperature within fractions of a second. That is as close to an instant alteration as the body is capable of.

How long dos it take you to shiver or develop goose bumps after you walk out into the cold? Most people will experience the first involuntary shiver almost instantly.


Quote:
It takes 15~30 mins to start sweating after you start exercising...
Is this a joke?

People do live in the tropics, and I can tell you that if it took 15 minutes to start sweating in response to exercise that would be impossible. In air temperatures of 35oC+ if you don't sweat for 15 minutes doing heavy exercise you are dead. Simple as that.

I ride my bike to work most mornings and it's less than 15 minutes ride even at a sedate pace. But I can assure you that I am sweating when I arrive at work.

Quote:
...and it will take 15~30 mins to stop sweating after you stop exercising, no matter what you do.
Once again, simply not true. In winter I will stop sweating within 5 minutes of running for an hour. The idea that a person in the Arctic will continue to sweat even thought hey are going into hypothermia makes no sense. The body sweats to reduce temperature. Once temperature falls to an acceptable level it stops. Often the temperature can't fall to an acceptable level within 15 minutes, but if you change into light clothing in cold weather I can assure you it will

Quote:
And extremely hot or cold showers will probably do more harm than good.
I'd have to see evidence to believe that.
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  #31  
Old 06-10-2009, 09:13 PM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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So your statement

Quote:
Doesn't matter if the skin is at 39^0C or at at 27o^C. The only information they act upon is external environmental temperature
.

isn't contradictory of


Quote:
If the skin temperature drops below 37°C a variety of responses are initiated to conserve the heat.
and when you said

Quote:
But in now way s the body’s temperature keyed to the skin temperature
you were actually repeatedly stressing

Quote:
that the brain recieves signals regarding the body temp from nerves in the skin
If you say so, but I think it is you who have misinterpreted me. By keyed I meant that it's a signal to the thermostat, not that it drives the thermostat. Anyway, I'm done.
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  #32  
Old 06-10-2009, 11:13 PM
Blake Blake is offline
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Sigh.

No that isn't contradictory because those are completely unrelated processes. Once again you have failed to understand your own references. One is discussing the control of the sweat glands. The other the feedback provided by the skin sensors to the hypothalamus.

As I said, I'm happy to explain this to you in detail if you want, pitched at whatever level of understanding you desire. But please stop trying to defend factually incorrect material based on vague incomprehension.

Quote:
By keyed I meant that it's a signal to the thermostat, not that it drives the thermostat.
That just makes the statement even more incorrect, and demonstrates that you still don't understand it.

The body most certainly does signal to the thermostat from core temperature. Your claims that it doesn't are completely and utterly incorrect in every conceivable way.
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  #33  
Old 06-11-2009, 01:03 AM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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Ok, now we're getting somewhere,

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Originally Posted by Blake View Post
The body most certainly does signal to the thermostat from core temperature. Your claims that it doesn't are completely and utterly incorrect in every conceivable way.
Well, no shit, good thing I never said that.


Let's go back to the beginning.
Since this is not a thread about the broad mechanisms of homeostatic thermoregulation I skipped over the imput of core temperature and christ do I wish I hadn't now.

In answer to the question the OP asked I'm saying that since sensors in your skin signal surface changes to the thermostat, a very steep gradient, such as would be caused by cold water, can trigger heat conserving measures such as vasoconstriction and cessation of sweating even before the core temp has normalized from your work out. Therefore, I'm suggesting that a cool shower which will absorb heat from skin that continues to be flooded with blood will probably draw off more heat in a short period of time than a cold one.


If you interpreted my earlier posts as being substantively different, than you have substantively misunderstood me.

Last edited by outlierrn; 06-11-2009 at 01:04 AM..
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  #34  
Old 06-11-2009, 01:15 AM
Blake Blake is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake
The body most certainly does signal to the thermostat from core temperature. Your claims that it doesn't are completely and utterly incorrect in every conceivable way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post

Well, no shit, good thing I never said that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by outlierrn
You're bodies thermostat doesn't key off your core temp....By keyed I meant that it's a signal to the thermostat.....

So yeah.
You did say that.
You said exactly that.
You said that your body's thermostat doesn't doesn't key off your core temp, and that keyed meant "a signal to the thermostat".

You said that your body's thermostat doesn't signal to the thermostat off your core temp.

That is factually incorrect.



I'll leave it to others whether they want to trust you after this display. I have certainly seen enough to know whether you have any knowledge at all on this subject or are just another "Google expert".

You don't even know what your own posts say.

Last edited by Blake; 06-11-2009 at 01:16 AM..
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  #35  
Old 06-11-2009, 01:42 AM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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You seem to be pursuing this for it's own sake. As I said, my initial statement was about the effect of skin temp on the thermostat, not core. I worded it badly. I conceded that in post #27. You acknowledged that in post #29. I repeated my regret in #33. I never made multiple or ongoing claims, yet you made it plural. It has nothing to do with the bulk of what I was trying to offer the OP, yet you keep focusing on it.


BTW I'm a registered nurse.
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  #36  
Old 06-11-2009, 01:53 AM
Johanna Johanna is offline
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Another thing to consider-- a hot shower puts steam into the air, and in summer the additional warm humidity makes it all muggy and sweaty in the vicinity afterward, making it harder to cool down.
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  #37  
Old 06-11-2009, 08:39 AM
Labrador Deceiver Labrador Deceiver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor View Post
It takes 15~30 mins to start sweating after you start exercising and it will take 15~30 mins to stop sweating after you stop exercising, no matter what you do.
Man, that's a good one. I'm wiping tears out of my eyes over here.
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  #38  
Old 06-11-2009, 10:42 AM
Evil Economist Evil Economist is offline
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I'm glad this topic sparked some discussion--I was worried that it might have the sort of obvious answer that would make me look stupid for asking the question. For what it's worth, I'm going to go with what seems to be the emerging consensus opinion and use lukewarm water, making sure to spend some time with my head and the back of my neck under the water, and maybe I'll try running warmer water over the soles of my feet before finishing.
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