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  #1  
Old 05-24-2015, 02:30 AM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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List of last occurences in WWII

Now that 70th anniversary of the end of WWII is approaching, could you tell some examples of last time when something noticeable happened in WWII?

For example:

Last (apparently) cavalry charge with drawn sabers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charge_...t_Isbuscenskij

Last US soldier to die in combat over Japan (B-32 treacherously attacked by fighter after surrender)
http://www.airspacemag.com/military-...099776/?no-ist
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  #2  
Old 05-24-2015, 03:54 AM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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Last u-boat to surrender (escaped to Argentina)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-977
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Old 05-24-2015, 04:25 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_zippermeyer View Post
Now that 70th anniversary of the end of WWII is approaching, could you tell some examples of last time when something noticeable happened in WWII?

For example:

Last (apparently) cavalry charge with drawn sabers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charge_...t_Isbuscenskij

Last US soldier to die in combat over Japan (B-32 treacherously attacked by fighter after surrender)
http://www.airspacemag.com/military-...099776/?no-ist
Actually I think cavalry was used in Afghanistan when the US took out the Taliban.
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Old 05-24-2015, 04:29 AM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Urbanredneck View Post
Actually I think cavalry was used in Afghanistan when the US took out the Taliban.

Right, I should have mentioned "last cavalry charge in Europe". Who knows how late they have been used in other continents.
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:59 AM
pdunderhill pdunderhill is offline
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Longbow use.

Lieutenant Colonel John Malcolm Thorpe Fleming "Jack" Churchill, used a Longbow d to kill a German Soldier during the British withdrawal to Dunkirk...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Churchill

Not the kind of guy I'd like as an enemy!

Peter
  #6  
Old 05-24-2015, 07:02 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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A lot of people mistakenly think the Battle of the Bulge (Dec 1944-Jan 1945) was the last German offensive of the war. But the real last German offensive was Operation Spring Awakening. It was an attempt to recapture some oil fields in Hungary in March 1945.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:07 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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Originally Posted by pdunderhill View Post
Lieutenant Colonel John Malcolm Thorpe Fleming "Jack" Churchill, used a Longbow d to kill a German Soldier during the British withdrawal to Dunkirk...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Churchill

Not the kind of guy I'd like as an enemy!

Peter
Bows were also used in Vietnam.
  #8  
Old 05-24-2015, 09:12 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
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Actually I think cavalry was used in Afghanistan when the US took out the Taliban.
There were SF guys on horses yeah, but did they actually charge home with sabers and bugle ?
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:33 AM
AK84 AK84 is online now
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
A lot of people mistakenly think the Battle of the Bulge (Dec 1944-Jan 1945) was the last German offensive of the war. But the real last German offensive was Operation Spring Awakening. It was an attempt to recapture some oil fields in Hungary in March 1945.
How are you defining "offensive", though. They continued with division and corps sized offensives till the end.

(I agree with your inclusion, just curious as to how to define it).
  #10  
Old 05-24-2015, 03:53 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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How are you defining "offensive", though. They continued with division and corps sized offensives till the end.

(I agree with your inclusion, just curious as to how to define it).
I'd say a real offensive requires that there be some strategic advance planned as a goal. The divisional and corps offenses that occurred in the final weeks may have been tactically offensive but they were strategically defensive: their goals were just to defend the ground the unit was already holding.
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Old 05-24-2015, 04:36 PM
Slithy Tove Slithy Tove is offline
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Have any battles since the Fall of Singapore use bicycle troops?
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:09 PM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
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More GQ, I think.
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:10 PM
Latro Latro is offline
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Have any battles since the Fall of Singapore use bicycle troops?
The Hungarians, Slovaks and IIRC even the Germans used bicycle troops in Russia.
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:22 PM
Latro Latro is offline
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Originally Posted by dr_zippermeyer View Post
Last (apparently) cavalry charge with drawn
The last cavalry attack was on 23-03-1945.
An ss unit of Kuban cossacks attacked a Bulgarian unit with drawn sabres.
Oh, and they won.
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:37 PM
Dissonance Dissonance is offline
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Originally Posted by Slithy Tove View Post
Have any battles since the Fall of Singapore use bicycle troops?
The reconnaissance battalion of every German infantry division included a bicycle troop:
Quote:
d. Reconnaissance Battalion

The reconnaissance battalion of the infantry division consists of a headquarters, a communications platoon, a horse troop, a bicycle troop and a heavy weapons company.
Many of the Volksgrenadier divisions organized at the end of the war included an entire bicycle battalion.

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Originally Posted by dr_zippermeyer View Post
Last US soldier to die in combat over Japan (B-32 treacherously attacked by fighter after surrender)
http://www.airspacemag.com/military-...099776/?no-ist
Only true if meant 100% literally, i.e. last to die over Japan rather than the last to die in combat against Japan. Fighting continued after the war was over, for example:
Quote:
February 1946 Philippines - on Lubang Island.
70 miles southwest of Maillia Bay a seven week campaign to clear the island was begun by the Filipino 341st and American 86th Division. Intense fighting developed on February 22, 1946 when troops encountered 30 Japanese. Eight Allied troops were killed, including 2 Filipinos. The Filipino and Americans sent for an additional 20,000 rounds of small arm ammunition, but not future battles occurred of this magnitude.

March 1946 Guam
A Japanese band of unknown size attacked and killed a six man patrol on Guam on March 1946.

End March - early April 1947 Peleliu Island - Band of Japanese lead by Ei Yamaguchi
A band of 33 Japanese soldiers, commanded by Lt. Ei Yamaguchi renews fighting on the island by attacking a Marine patrol with hand grenades. At that time, only 150 Marines were stationed on the island, with 35 dependents. Reinforcement were called in to hunt down the hideouts. American patrols with a Japanese Admiral sent to convince the troops that the war was indeed over finally convinced the holdouts to come out peacefully. The band emerged from the jungle in two groups in late April, lead by Ei Yamaguchi who turned over his sword and unit's battle flags.
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Old 05-24-2015, 06:01 PM
chacoguy chacoguy is offline
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Have any battles since the Fall of Singapore use bicycle troops?
Ho Chi Minh Trail.
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Old 05-24-2015, 06:19 PM
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Probably the last construction of a full size airworthy glider in a prison camp.

The Colditz Cock
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Old 05-24-2015, 06:21 PM
Mr. Kobayashi Mr. Kobayashi is offline
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Probably the last construction of a full size airworthy glider in a prison camp.

The Colditz Cock
Speaking of gliders, last use of gliders to deliver infantry.
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Old 05-24-2015, 06:44 PM
Slithy Tove Slithy Tove is offline
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Ho Chi Minh Trail.
I thought of that, but were there troops going into battle on bikes, or just bikes with cargo?

Has anyone fought on skis since WWII?
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Old 05-24-2015, 07:39 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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The Soviets invaded the Kuril Islands on August 18, 1945, three days after Japan had surrendered.

Of course the Japanese didn't surrender in the Philippines until September 3.
  #21  
Old 05-24-2015, 07:41 PM
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I'd be curious to know when the last chemical or biological attack was carried out by Japan—the best reference I can find claims May, 1945 (in China), but the whole matter's rather hazy.
  #22  
Old 05-24-2015, 08:57 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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WW2 still has the largest killings in many categories:

Biggest in person executioner: Vasily Blokhin who personally carried out much of the Katyn Massacre.
Moving out a bit in range we have the biggest sniper: Simho Hayha who killed almost 1000 Soviets during the finno-soviet war.
(Probably) Biggest tactical killer ever: Stuka bomber Hans Rudel who destroyed 2,000 vehicles including several warships.
Biggest one-shot killer: well, the atom bombs.

These are WW2 last in that they have not been surpassed
  #23  
Old 05-24-2015, 09:25 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Has anyone fought on skis since WWII?
I've seen pictures of Indian and Pakistani troops on skis in the Siachen Glacier conflict.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:56 PM
Latro Latro is offline
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Any one an idea what would be the last warcrime committed during WWII?
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:34 PM
AK84 AK84 is online now
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I've seen pictures of Indian and Pakistani troops on skis in the Siachen Glacier conflict.
All over the LOC, not just Siachen. And Pakistani troops have used skis in mountainous terrain all over FATA in the current Insurgency.
  #26  
Old 05-24-2015, 10:43 PM
CraterLayer CraterLayer is offline
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On August 16, 1945, the day after Japan surrendered, there were only four American airmen still alive at the Osaka Kempei Tai prison. The men were told that they were being freed and were given back their uniforms, unloaded weapons, personal effects and even their parachutes. Korean forced-laborers reported that the men were smiling and waved to them as they were leaving the camp. One even yelled that they were "going home".
Instead the Japanese led them to the cemetery where a large hole had been dug. They were beheaded and thrown into the ditch. On top of them were piled their personal effects, along with those of the 55 Americans previously killed, and any other evidence that Americans had ever been held there.
  #27  
Old 05-24-2015, 11:03 PM
Terminus Est Terminus Est is offline
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Of course the Japanese didn't surrender in the Philippines until September 3.
The last Japanese soldier to surrender in the Philippines was Lt. Hiroo Onoda who heldout until March 1974. He finally came out only after being relieved of duty by his former commanding officer. One other holdout, Private Teruo Nakamura, was discovered in Indonesia and finally surrendered in December 1974. He is believed to have been the last holdout, although there were unconfirmed reports throughout the 1980s of more stragglers throughout the South Pacific and Southeast Asia.

The last Japanese soldier killed in action was PFC Kinshichi Kozuka, who was killed in a shootout with Philippine police in October 1972.
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Old 05-24-2015, 11:15 PM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is offline
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In March of 1945, my dad (a bombardier) dropped his last B-17 load of bombs on Germany. Does that count?
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Old 05-24-2015, 11:31 PM
LawMonkey LawMonkey is offline
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Originally Posted by CraterLayer View Post
On August 16, 1945, the day after Japan surrendered, there were only four American airmen still alive at the Osaka Kempei Tai prison. The men were told that they were being freed and were given back their uniforms, unloaded weapons, personal effects and even their parachutes. Korean forced-laborers reported that the men were smiling and waved to them as they were leaving the camp. One even yelled that they were "going home".
Instead the Japanese led them to the cemetery where a large hole had been dug. They were beheaded and thrown into the ditch. On top of them were piled their personal effects, along with those of the 55 Americans previously killed, and any other evidence that Americans had ever been held there.
I was going to respond to the question about the last war crime with a proper prevarication about how well, no one could really know the last individual war crime, and we could at best look for the last Major Atrocity that was notable enough to be recorded.

And then you come out with this. Dammit.
  #30  
Old 05-25-2015, 11:08 AM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
In March of 1945, my dad (a bombardier) dropped his last B-17 load of bombs on Germany. Does that count?
I guess that counts. I wonder where the bombs landed. BTW in case you haven't read US B-17 bombardier's account "Shot at and Missed" I highly highly recommend it. One of the best books I have ever read and oddly also one of the funniest.
  #31  
Old 05-25-2015, 11:12 AM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Terminus Est View Post
The last Japanese soldier to surrender in the Philippines was Lt. Hiroo Onoda who heldout until March 1974. He finally came out only after being relieved of duty by his former commanding officer. One other holdout, Private Teruo Nakamura, was discovered in Indonesia and finally surrendered in December 1974. He is believed to have been the last holdout, although there were unconfirmed reports throughout the 1980s of more stragglers throughout the South Pacific and Southeast Asia.

The last Japanese soldier killed in action was PFC Kinshichi Kozuka, who was killed in a shootout with Philippine police in October 1972.
This is so interesting stuff. They purposely searched these last guys because they knew their names and everything right? So what about those no one searched for because they were thought to be dead? I wouldn't be surprised if many were left even after 1974. I think in some remote villages people could tell some really interesting stuff about strange campfires, missing food etc.
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Old 05-25-2015, 01:37 PM
Dissonance Dissonance is offline
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This is so interesting stuff. They purposely searched these last guys because they knew their names and everything right? So what about those no one searched for because they were thought to be dead? I wouldn't be surprised if many were left even after 1974. I think in some remote villages people could tell some really interesting stuff about strange campfires, missing food etc.
See the link in post 15; it contains a great deal of information on Japanese holdouts. Nobody was looking for Lt. Hiroo Onoda who had been declared legally dead in Japan 15 years prior. He also wasn't the last confirmed Japanese holdout to surrender, though widely (mis)known as such. Private Teruo Nakamura was arrested by Indonesian soldiers on December 18, 1974.

Two further Japanese didn't surrender until 1989, but aren't widely regarded as 'true' holdouts as they had joined the Communist Party of Malaya to continue the war against Britain. Shigeyuki Hashimoto and Kiyoaki Tanaka surrendered when their guerrilla group laid down its arms on December 2, 1989.
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Old 05-25-2015, 08:29 PM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
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Five or ten years ago The History Channel (I think) did a really good re-enactment documentary about Lt. Onoda. He originally was part of a party of holdout soldiers of which he was the ranking soldier. They were involved in several 'incidents' with local peoples and authorities (including stealing food and even some shootings).

A Japanese college student who heard about the story went there to try and contact him. He was successful and the two talked over the course of several days. Lt. Onoda still refused to believe the war was over, but the college student learned a lot about him, including the name of his superior officer. He went back to Japan and located him, and they (along with Philippine authorities) coaxed him out of the jungle to surrender. His uniform was still in reasonable condition and his service rifle was still functioning! I believe the Philippine president gave him a full pardon for any crimes committed (which may have included murder) and he returned to Japan a national hero.
  #34  
Old 05-26-2015, 08:33 AM
mlees mlees is offline
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A lot of people mistakenly think the Battle of the Bulge (Dec 1944-Jan 1945) was the last German offensive of the war. But the real last German offensive was Operation Spring Awakening. It was an attempt to recapture some oil fields in Hungary in March 1945.
How do you define "German Offensive"?

Hitler ordered the IX Army and XII Army to disengage the enemy on their fronts, and move to the relief of Berlin, which was almost completely encircled. Both armies attempted to do so, beginning around 22 April.

Last edited by mlees; 05-26-2015 at 08:36 AM.
  #35  
Old 05-26-2015, 08:46 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is online now
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Originally Posted by CraterLayer View Post
On August 16, 1945, the day after Japan surrendered, there were only four American airmen still alive at the Osaka Kempei Tai prison. The men were told that they were being freed and were given back their uniforms, unloaded weapons, personal effects and even their parachutes. Korean forced-laborers reported that the men were smiling and waved to them as they were leaving the camp. One even yelled that they were "going home".
Instead the Japanese led them to the cemetery where a large hole had been dug. They were beheaded and thrown into the ditch. On top of them were piled their personal effects, along with those of the 55 Americans previously killed, and any other evidence that Americans had ever been held there.
Cite?
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Old 05-27-2015, 01:19 PM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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Last battlefield in Europe: Georgian Wehrmacht volunteers uprising on Texel (5 April 1945 – 20 May 1945)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_uprising_on_Texel

"Shortly after midnight on the night of 5–6 April 1945, the Georgians rose up and gained control of nearly the entire island. Approximately four hundred German soldiers were killed in the initial uprising, almost all while sleeping in the quarters they shared with Georgians, who used knives and bayonets."
  #37  
Old 05-27-2015, 01:37 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Originally Posted by mlees View Post
How do you define "German Offensive"?

Hitler ordered the IX Army and XII Army to disengage the enemy on their fronts, and move to the relief of Berlin, which was almost completely encircled. Both armies attempted to do so, beginning around 22 April.
As I said above, that sounds to me more like a defensive operation than an offensive. And I'd also question whether the operation ever got going.
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:03 PM
Donnerwetter Donnerwetter is offline
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Last German unit to surrender: Weather troop Haudegen (“swashbuckler”) on September 4, 1945 (on the Arctic island of Svalbard in the Arctic Ocean).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Haudegen
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:08 PM
Dissonance Dissonance is offline
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As I said above, that sounds to me more like a defensive operation than an offensive. And I'd also question whether the operation ever got going.
It was Hitler issuing nonsensical orders to largely non-existent troops. See map here, IX Army was itself surrounded. From wiki on Hitler's orders:
Quote:
When the old southern flank of the IV Panzer Army had some local successes counter-attacking north against the 1st Ukrainian Front, Hitler gave orders that showed his grasp of military reality was completely gone. He ordered the IX Army to hold Cottbus and set up a front facing west.[57] Then they were to attack the Soviet columns advancing north. This would supposedly allow them to form a northern pincer that would meet the IV Panzer Army coming from the south and envelop the 1st Ukrainian Front before destroying it.[58] They were to anticipate a southward attack by the III Panzer Army and be ready to be the southern arm of a pincer attack that would envelop 1st Belorussian Front, which would be destroyed by SS-General Felix Steiner's Army Detachment advancing from north of Berlin.[59] Later in the day, when Steiner explained that he did not have the divisions to do this, Heinrici made it clear to Hitler's staff that unless the IX Army retreated immediately, it would be enveloped by the Soviets. He stressed that it was already too late for it to move north-west to Berlin and would have to retreat west.[59] Heinrici went on to say that if Hitler did not allow it to move west, he would ask to be relieved of his command.[60]

On 22 April, at his afternoon situation conference, Hitler fell into a tearful rage when he understood that his plans of the day before were not going to be realised. He declared that the war was lost; he blamed the generals and announced that he would stay on in Berlin until the end and then kill himself.[61] In an attempt to coax Hitler out of his rage, General Alfred Jodl speculated that General Walther Wenck's XII Army, which was facing the Americans, could move to Berlin because the Americans, already on the Elbe River, were unlikely to move further east. This assumption was based on his viewing of the captured Eclipse documents, which organized the partition of Germany among the Allies.[62] Hitler immediately grasped the idea, and within hours Wenck was ordered to disengage from the Americans and move the XII Army north-east to support Berlin.[59] It was then realised that if the IX Army moved west, it could link up with the XII Army. In the evening Heinrici was given permission to make the link-up.[63]
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:21 PM
Donnerwetter Donnerwetter is offline
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Last German servicemen to be executed for desertion: Sailors Bruno Dörfer and Rainer Beck on Mai 13, 1945 (i. e. 5 days after Germany surrendered).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/13_May_...rter_execution
  #41  
Old 05-27-2015, 02:36 PM
dr_zippermeyer dr_zippermeyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Donnerwetter View Post
Last German servicemen to be executed for desertion: Sailors Bruno Dörfer and Rainer Beck on Mai 13, 1945 (i. e. 5 days after Germany surrendered).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/13_May_...rter_execution
So this happened in the presence of Canadians. :/

I remember that in biography of one u-boat captain (Iron Coffins) there was also an ugly, messy execution of two German soldiers after surrender. But I guess it was like a day or two after surrender and there weren't allies nearby.
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:37 PM
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According to this, the last battle between sailing vessels. Scroll to #3.
  #43  
Old 05-27-2015, 02:53 PM
Donnerwetter Donnerwetter is offline
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So this happened in the presence of Canadians. :/

I remember that in biography of one u-boat captain (Iron Coffins) there was also an ugly, messy execution of two German soldiers after surrender. But I guess it was like a day or two after surrender and there weren't allies nearby.
There were many “irregular” killings/lynchings of suspected German deserters in the last weeks and days before the surrender. I am not aware of any that occurred after May 8 (except the one mentioned before). There were, however, two cases of German POWs murdering fellow POWs who they considered “traitors”. This happened in Oklahoma in 1943 and in Arizona in 1944. The killers were sentenced to death and executed by the US military in the summer of 1945. Their graves are in the Fort Leavenworth cemetery:

http://www.leavenworthtimes.com/arti...NEWS/308139935
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:57 PM
Donnerwetter Donnerwetter is offline
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Last German POW to surrender to US authorities after having escaped from a POW camp: Georg Gärtner in 1985:

Quote:
Gärtner came from Schweidnitz, Lower Silesia (now Świdnica, Poland). He served with the Afrika Korps. He was captured by Allied troops in Tunis in 1943 and was brought to America as a prisoner of war. He escaped from his prison camp in Deming, New Mexico, at the war's end because he was afraid of being turned over to the Soviets. He created a new identity as Dennis Whiles, marrying and leading a relatively quiet life. According to his book, an exception was taking part of the first ski rescue team to the City of San Francisco in January 1952, immediately after which Life magazine took his and the group's picture. Meanwhile, his FBI wanted posters were in most post offices.

Gärtner was never caught by the authorities, but came forward 40 years later in 1985, "surrendering" to Bryant Gumbel on the Today Show. He effectively became the last World War II German prisoner of war in America.[1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_G%C3%A4rtner
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Old 05-28-2015, 08:27 AM
mlees mlees is offline
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As I said above, that sounds to me more like a defensive operation than an offensive. And I'd also question whether the operation ever got going.
Hmmm. I would have called the order a "counter attack". Obviously, your mileage varies.
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Old 05-29-2015, 11:11 PM
CraterLayer CraterLayer is offline
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On August 16, 1945, the day after Japan surrendered, there were only four American airmen still alive at the Osaka Kempei Tai prison. The men were told that they were being freed and were given back their uniforms, unloaded weapons, personal effects and even their parachutes. Korean forced-laborers reported that the men were smiling and waved to them as they were leaving the camp. One even yelled that they were "going home".
Instead the Japanese led them to the cemetery where a large hole had been dug. They were beheaded and thrown into the ditch. On top of them were piled their personal effects, along with those of the 55 Americans previously killed, and any other evidence that Americans had ever been held there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
Cite?
I'm sorry, I've been very sick all week and haven't been on the computer. My uncle was one of the other 55, so I am close to the subject. For some reason the government classified what occurred there, I think probably because they didn't uncover what happened until 1947, when China and eastern Europe where falling to the communists. In the early 90's I was able to get the declassified documents from the National Archives, and its a horrible story.

There is little on the internet concerning this, at least the last time I checked. However there was kind of a humorous story of a downed airmen who bullshitted the Japs about his knowledge of tha atomic bomb, which saved his life because he was sent to Tokyo, unlike his crewmates who were sent to Osaka. I'll look that story up and provide a link.

If you want more cites, I have boxes of documents, some of which I'll scan into the computer. If there are any writers out there looking for an intense story, contact me. This is a piece of history that needs to be told.
  #47  
Old 05-29-2015, 11:31 PM
CraterLayer CraterLayer is offline
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Found the link:

http://kentmitchellsramblings.blogsp...sung-hero.html
  #48  
Old 05-30-2015, 12:23 AM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is offline
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August 9, 1945 was the last time an atomic bomb was used in combat.
  #49  
Old 05-30-2015, 12:29 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
August 9, 1945 was the last time an atomic bomb was used in combat.
One can hope anyway.
  #50  
Old 06-02-2015, 08:57 AM
watchwolf49 watchwolf49 is offline
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The last looted asset returned to its proper owner - yet to be determined.

Last edited by watchwolf49; 06-02-2015 at 08:58 AM. Reason: pronoun misfunction
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