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  #1  
Old 08-28-2009, 10:39 PM
tzimmerman tzimmerman is offline
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Why do I sweat when I sleep?

When I wake up, especially from a nap during the day, I usually am drenched with sweat like I just ran a 5k, even when the ac is blasting. What's the deal with that? I though body temperature goes down when you sleep.
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  #2  
Old 08-28-2009, 10:53 PM
Bruce Wayne Bruce Wayne is offline
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Because you have either HIV, cancer, tuberculosis or a host of other diseases.
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  #3  
Old 08-28-2009, 11:03 PM
minor7flat5 minor7flat5 is offline
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I'm the same way and my assumption has always been that it is a result of two things: some strange metabolism thing happening in our sleep combined with the stillness of the surrounding air.

I find that even in relatively cool air, I cannot get to sleep unless there is a fan stirring things up. It's as if a blanket of stuffy air accumulates around me unless there is some active ventilation happening.
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Old 08-28-2009, 11:13 PM
IAmNotSpartacus IAmNotSpartacus is offline
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Originally Posted by Bruce Wayne View Post
You sure 'bout that, doc?
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  #5  
Old 08-28-2009, 11:34 PM
kelly5078 kelly5078 is offline
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I don't know, but I do it too. Not all the time, and sometimes it's because I feel cold, put on a blanket, then warm up in my sleep. But most of the time I have no idea.

I find that using melatonin as a sleep aid causes me to sweat more, so if you do that, it might be a factor.
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  #6  
Old 08-29-2009, 12:09 AM
Bruce Wayne Bruce Wayne is offline
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Originally Posted by IAmNotSpartacus View Post
You sure 'bout that, doc?
No, I'm not, I was just being stupid. I looked up the same question a few months back because of my own night sweats. The wikipedia article scared the crap out of me. There were no harmless explanations. I'm sure I don't have any of those diseases listed and I'm not a woman, so its not menopause. Here is another site. TB gets mentioned again. Ouch.
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  #7  
Old 08-29-2009, 12:19 AM
Pasta Pasta is offline
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FWIW, I often wake up from naps a bit sweaty. (Maybe 20% of naps.) I also only ever drool during naps. (<20% of naps.) During a proper night's sleep: all dry, more or less.

Been like that as long as I remember.

ETA: Also, extreme jetlag-y sleep usually leads to my sweating...

Last edited by Pasta; 08-29-2009 at 12:21 AM..
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  #8  
Old 08-29-2009, 12:55 AM
cmyk cmyk is online now
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Turn down the temp on the AC. I can't get a good night's sleep unless it's ~70F. Actually, I find I get sweaty more in the winter, because we have the heat cranked up, and maybe an extra blanket on the bed.

A fan is a good recommendation too, even a ceiling fan. I didn't start getting night sweats until I was in my mid-20s. Must be a 'getting older' thing. I'm 36 now, and I think I have it under control. But every so often, I'll wake up and have to get a frikkin' towel. Just take more care of the ambient temperature, and learn what to set it at to stay dry and comfy.
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  #9  
Old 08-29-2009, 01:05 AM
glowacks glowacks is offline
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I attribute it to having blankets so air-tight that your sweat is unable to evaporate. Your body keeps on putting out sweat as it overheats, all of which is there when you wake up. I myself have often needed a towel after waking up at night with a thoroughly socked blanket.

If this is the case, the only way to really fix it is to not have blankets that prevent the circulation of air from your body cavity inside those blankets, or at least blankets that allow more heat to escape. Since the purpose of blankets, particularly in winter, is to keep you warm, it seems hard to avoid once your body temperature gets to the point that your body starts sweating.

Last edited by glowacks; 08-29-2009 at 01:08 AM..
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  #10  
Old 08-29-2009, 07:06 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Originally Posted by glowacks View Post
I attribute it to having blankets so air-tight that your sweat is unable to evaporate. Your body keeps on putting out sweat as it overheats, all of which is there when you wake up. I myself have often needed a towel after waking up at night with a thoroughly socked blanket.

If this is the case, the only way to really fix it is to not have blankets that prevent the circulation of air from your body cavity inside those blankets, or at least blankets that allow more heat to escape. Since the purpose of blankets, particularly in winter, is to keep you warm, it seems hard to avoid once your body temperature gets to the point that your body starts sweating.
Nope. mrAru sleeps with a bedsheet only and the room is currently airconditioned within an inch of its life and he still sweats. Me, Im going through hysterectomy menopause and am hot flashing when i am jus tsitting here... but he didnt have one [and he has sweat for years at night. he has to sleep with a towel on his pillow]
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  #11  
Old 08-29-2009, 12:13 PM
Bumbazine Bumbazine is offline
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One condition I didn't see in the referenced link was diabetes. I don't remember exactly how it works, but, according to my doctor, it has to do with blood sugar.
Google 'diabetic night sweats' to get more links than you'll know what to do with.
I know that if I eat or drink anything sweet within 3 or 4 hours before bed, I get night sweats. (Type II diabetic here.)
Anyway, ask you doctor to check you next time you visit.
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  #12  
Old 08-29-2009, 11:59 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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Originally Posted by Bruce Wayne View Post
Shit, that means I've been dying for over 40 years now.
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  #13  
Old 08-30-2009, 12:13 AM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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I do too. I like a heavy blanket, and so I sweat.

Note that my Doc sez I am disgustingly healthy. So, Bruce Wayne you are wrong.
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I am not a real Doctor
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  #14  
Old 08-30-2009, 12:44 AM
Captain_Awesome Captain_Awesome is offline
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Genetic hyperhydrosis is relatively common, affecting about 1-3% of the population. The primary genetic form is not something of medical concern, beyond managing the symptoms (for which their are a variety of options). IIRC it tends to become apparent at or around puberty, so if your onset differs it would be wise to seek a consult to rule out the secondary causes of which there are many.
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  #15  
Old 08-31-2009, 10:11 AM
Paintcharge Paintcharge is offline
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I need it to be warm in order to not sweat at night. It seems that if my face (outside of the covers) gets cold then my stupid body (inside the covers) overworks in order to warm up. Develops into a fun cycle of waking up cold and sweaty, roll over, rearrange covers, and back to sleep.
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  #16  
Old 08-31-2009, 11:03 AM
Lanzy Lanzy is offline
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I use a light sheet, always have a fan, keep the room at 73F.....always sweat.
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  #17  
Old 08-31-2009, 11:21 AM
picunurse picunurse is offline
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Night sweats are different than waking up a little sweaty. Night sweats drench the bed, sometimes even the mattress. The above link differentiates between the two.
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  #18  
Old 09-01-2009, 02:34 PM
YogSosoth YogSosoth is online now
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Maybe you've been having one too many dreams about running from something?
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  #19  
Old 09-01-2009, 02:37 PM
TheMadHun TheMadHun is offline
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I occasionally sweat. I find it's usually when I've fallen asleep "wrong" either twisted in the bedclothes or with my neck at an odd angle.
When I've looked it up on the web, the medical consensus seems to be that if it's not every night for a week, then it's indicative of nothing, just a fluke, akin to having your leg fall asleep.
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  #20  
Old 09-01-2009, 03:24 PM
MeanOldLady MeanOldLady is offline
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Do you drink a lot?
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  #21  
Old 09-01-2009, 03:54 PM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Do you snore?
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  #22  
Old 09-01-2009, 05:12 PM
Hennessy Hennessy is offline
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I don't sleep sweat often but when I wake up sometimes, I'm in a pool of sweat but also drool. It seems I just woke up from the best sleep ever, I always wake from very vivid dreams and I feel healthily refreshed. If this isn't the case then my next guess would be no escaping from the blanket someone else mentioned. I hope it isn't something I should worry about, it sure doesn't feel like it.
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  #23  
Old 09-01-2009, 06:35 PM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hennessy View Post
I don't sleep sweat often but when I wake up sometimes, I'm in a pool of sweat but also drool. It seems I just woke up from the best sleep ever, I always wake from very vivid dreams and I feel healthily refreshed. If this isn't the case then my next guess would be no escaping from the blanket someone else mentioned. I hope it isn't something I should worry about, it sure doesn't feel like it.
I drooled also, but that is because i had trained myself to sleep with my jaws open about half an inch to stop grinding my teeth, i have a mouth guard now, but if I want I can still sleep with my mouth open.
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  #24  
Old 09-01-2009, 08:28 PM
Rushgeekgirl Rushgeekgirl is offline
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I've started sweating a lot more, especially at night, since I started Zoloft a few months back.
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  #25  
Old 09-01-2009, 10:10 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
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I've been dealing with this off and on the past few months. I will wake and find my bed, pillows and blanket drenched with sweat. I finally put 2 and 2 together and realized it was a new medication causing it.
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  #26  
Old 09-02-2009, 10:08 AM
Bruce Wayne Bruce Wayne is offline
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
Note that my Doc sez I am disgustingly healthy. So, Bruce Wayne you are wrong.
Thank God.

Thanks for the link picunurse.
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