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  #1  
Old 08-31-2009, 09:20 PM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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Hopped up on goofballs. Where'd that come from?

First it was the way for un-hip old people to ask if someone was high. I hear it now more like, "Are you crazy?" I have a vague psuedo-memory of hearing it on Dragnet a long time ago but I'm not really sure.

Does anyone know the first time some described someone else as "Hopped up on goofballs"?
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  #2  
Old 08-31-2009, 09:26 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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I don't know if this is the origin, but the Simpsons did this in "Homer Loves Flanders" in season five (aired March 1994). Chief Wiggum pulls Ned Flanders over for erratic driving. Ned protests he isn't "hepped [not hopped] up on goofballs," but after he fails a field sobriety test - a church bus drives by and Ned is humiliated, and falls over - Chief Wiggum announces to the town that he is indeed "hepped up on goofballs."
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Old 08-31-2009, 09:31 PM
kunilou kunilou is online now
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"Goofballs" originally referred to barbituarates, which came into wide use after World War 2. Presumably the term derives from "goofy."

"Hopped up" predates "goofball," first appearing in about 1930 and always connected to drug use. The term may have come from "hop" which was a slang term for opium.

Last edited by kunilou; 08-31-2009 at 09:31 PM..
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Old 09-01-2009, 01:55 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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At one time,IIRC, goofball referred to simultaneously taking a serious up and a serious down, such as heroin and crystal methamphetamine, or in a lower dose, phenobarbitol and benzedrine.

It was said to be risky at the time. The Grateful Dead (or somebody) sang, "Uppers and downers is bad for you, it ain't like drinkin' wine."
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Old 09-01-2009, 02:24 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is online now
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I always thought it came from Dragnet. A little googling reveals direct quotes from Dragnet using the terms "hopped up" and "goofballs" (in a drug context) separately, so putting them together in one sentence was probably first done by someone parodying Joe Friday.
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Old 09-01-2009, 02:49 PM
maladroit maladroit is offline
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This sounds plausible.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_b...sages/134.html

"Hopped up" = "under the influence of narcotics; drugged" (Dict. of Amer. Slang; first quotation 1930; "orig. addict use, now some general use and almost no addict use"; derivative meanings also given, such as "excited; enthusiastic").

"Hop" is also defined as opium or any narcotic drug; first quotation, 1887.

Oh, I just noticed this doesn't contain any mention of the 'goofballs', but still seems pertinent to me.

Last edited by maladroit; 09-01-2009 at 02:50 PM..
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  #7  
Old 09-01-2009, 02:57 PM
maladroit maladroit is offline
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http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=g&p=8

This places the usage of goofball for narcotics at 1938.

Combination can't have been far behind.
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  #8  
Old 09-01-2009, 03:10 PM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is online now
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The only context I recall hearing it in is as one of those sounds bytes they play on the radio just after a station break. I've never actually seen Dragnet myself but I recognize the sound of it from seeing so many parodies and that was definitely Sgt. Friday.
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  #9  
Old 09-01-2009, 03:36 PM
Shodan Shodan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
At one time,IIRC, goofball referred to simultaneously taking a serious up and a serious down, such as heroin and crystal methamphetamine, or in a lower dose, phenobarbitol and benzedrine.
We called that a "speedball", and then much later, a "Belushi cocktail".

"Goofballs" were Seconal or the like. Qualudes were Quinlans.

Regards,
Shodan
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  #10  
Old 09-01-2009, 03:47 PM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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I've used the phrase "hopped up on goofballs" but I'm not sure where I've heard it. It may have been The Simpsons.
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  #11  
Old 09-01-2009, 05:25 PM
bup bup is offline
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Well, of course 'hopped up' and 'goofballs' are old drug slang, but the specific phrase 'hopped up on goofballs?' Chief Wiggum, as far as I know.
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  #12  
Old 03-31-2010, 07:43 PM
TikiMojo TikiMojo is offline
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Originally Posted by Biffy the Elephant Shrew View Post
I always thought it came from Dragnet. A little googling reveals direct quotes from Dragnet using the terms "hopped up" and "goofballs" (in a drug context) separately, so putting them together in one sentence was probably first done by someone parodying Joe Friday.
The writers for Dragnet had to get it from someplace. You'll see the term come up often in the works of William Burroughs - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_S._Burroughs

Drug use is a frequent theme in his work.

Not that I'm an expert, but I've never seen "being hopped up on goofballs" referring to a specific drug or way of taking drugs, so the term itself may be sort of a code word to divide the pretender from the insider.
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  #13  
Old 03-31-2010, 08:30 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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1965(ACTUALLY 1966). Google book cite.

You can only read a snippet. But it's for real.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Rqb...&as_brr=0&cd=2
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  #14  
Old 03-31-2010, 10:58 PM
Frostillicus Frostillicus is offline
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I thought Frank Burns was the first to utter this memorable line. Right after the immortal "tough cheese."
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  #15  
Old 04-01-2010, 12:28 AM
In Winnipeg In Winnipeg is offline
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Regarding "hop", my mother and my uncles often referred to a drug user as a "hop head". I think I heard Red Forman in That 70s Show also utter the same term.
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  #16  
Old 04-01-2010, 06:22 AM
BigT BigT is offline
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I think the Simpson reference is why the phrase itself is somewhat popular today, and they likely got it from Dragnet, who got it from real, yet most likely outdated street slang. I don't think I've ever heard of it as being anything other than anachronistic, and I remember some that said that it sounded "square."
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  #17  
Old 04-01-2010, 07:49 PM
minlokwat minlokwat is offline
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Didn't Regis say something very similar to Kramer when he was promoting his coffee table books (about coffe tables)?

I know this doesn't predate the Dragnet usage by a long shot but it is another reference at least.
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  #18  
Old 04-01-2010, 09:27 PM
Shoeless Shoeless is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
We called that a "speedball", and then much later, a "Belushi cocktail".

"Goofballs" were Seconal or the like. Qualudes were Quinlans.

Regards,
Shodan
I always wondered if that is what Springsteen's singing about in that song "Glory Days":

"He could throw that speedball by you, make you look like a fool, boy."
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  #19  
Old 04-02-2010, 10:05 PM
pukachelle pukachelle is offline
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Way before Simpsons and Dragnet. Wally Cleaver (Tony Dow) said it on Leave it to Beaver.
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  #20  
Old 04-02-2010, 10:15 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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Originally Posted by pukachelle View Post
Way before Simpsons and Dragnet. Wally Cleaver (Tony Dow) said it on Leave it to Beaver.
Well, certainly before the Simpsons. Dragnet--I don't know. Many of the posters here might not realize that there were two versions of the show. Can you give us a cite for the Leave it to Beaver use?
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  #21  
Old 04-03-2010, 06:49 AM
Cliffy Cliffy is offline
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Originally Posted by In Winnipeg View Post
Regarding "hop", my mother and my uncles often referred to a drug user as a "hop head". I think I heard Red Forman in That 70s Show also utter the same term.
I found myself using it just yesterday. Then I thought to myself "Where did I get that term? NYPD Blue, maybe?"

--Cliffy
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  #22  
Old 04-09-2010, 02:33 AM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
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As a member of The Simpsons Stickler Society lets get the quote correct.
Chief Wiggum did NOT say that line, Ned did. And he said 'hepped up' not 'hopped up'.

From The Simpsons Archive:

Ned: I told you, officer, I'm not "hepped up on Goofballs."
Wiggum: [bored] Yeah, right.
[a church tour bus drives by]
Lovejoy: Ned Flanders! I never would have imagined.
[Ned feels weak with shame, then faints]
Wiggum: High as a kite, everybody! Goofballs!


Ah, back when the show was so funny.

I say it all the time as a sarcastic way of responding to an incredulous statement. It works so well because its over the top, its mocking what once was a very serious statement, and the word goofball itself is just, well, goofy!
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  #23  
Old 04-09-2010, 03:18 AM
Koxinga Koxinga is offline
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Now tell me this: I've never heard the OP's phrase in either Dragnet or The Simpsons.

But I *do* have the phrase stuck in my mind: "Hopped up on bennies and goofballs." Is that from long ago "Just Say No" propaganda?
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Old 04-09-2010, 03:23 AM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
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For some reason I am picturing Dan Akroyd uttering this line. Not sure, but I think it is also from an SNL spawn.
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  #25  
Old 04-09-2010, 06:40 AM
Girl From Mars Girl From Mars is offline
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I feel like I've heard the line - the Naked Gun series seems to be ringing a bell?
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  #26  
Old 04-09-2010, 06:49 AM
ShibbOleth ShibbOleth is offline
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Originally Posted by Shoeless View Post
I always wondered if that is what Springsteen's singing about in that song "Glory Days":

"He could throw that speedball by you, make you look like a fool, boy."
In case you're not being facetious, that's about a guy who was a good athlete in high school and still lives on that, many years later. The line is reference to him pitching baseball. The song is about people living in the past.
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  #27  
Old 04-09-2010, 11:37 AM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
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Originally Posted by samclem View Post
1965(ACTUALLY 1966). Google book cite.

You can only read a snippet. But it's for real.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Rqb...&as_brr=0&cd=2
This didn't reveal anything when I clicked the link. The earliest I could find was Horace Woodroof's Stone Wall College from 1970, p. 175: "...killed him with his bare hands. Hopped up on goofballs, he stabbed him repeatedly with a foot-long dirk, butchering him up so badly that the warden and deputy warden made Monty, who was photographer for The Inside Story, take pictures of...." That's all Google will give. Apparently it's autobiographical.
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  #28  
Old 04-09-2010, 01:09 PM
jsc1953 jsc1953 is online now
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Originally Posted by ShibbOleth View Post
In case you're not being facetious, that's about a guy who was a good athlete in high school and still lives on that, many years later. The line is reference to him pitching baseball. The song is about people living in the past.
Love the song, but Bruce should know better. No one who knows anything about baseball ever uses the word "speedball". It's a fastball, heater, Number 1, cheese.
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  #29  
Old 04-09-2010, 01:45 PM
ShibbOleth ShibbOleth is offline
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Maybe he wasn't much into baseball. Or they use different words near the Shore. Who knows? I guess lyrically, curve ball would have also worked. Split fingered fastball would not.

Last edited by ShibbOleth; 04-09-2010 at 01:46 PM..
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  #30  
Old 04-09-2010, 02:24 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
1965(ACTUALLY 1966). Google book cite.

You can only read a snippet. But it's for real.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Rqb...&as_brr=0&cd=2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
This didn't reveal anything when I clicked the link. T.
Sorry, you could read it from the original search for the phrase, but not when you went to the page link. I've refined the link so it shows what I found.

http://books.google.com/books?as_q=&...isbn=&as_issn=
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  #31  
Old 04-09-2010, 06:53 PM
panamajack panamajack is offline
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I've never seen 'speedball', but "speed ball" for a fastball is not unheard of, especially in older sources. See also here and here for more modern cites.
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  #32  
Old 04-09-2010, 07:18 PM
gaffa gaffa is offline
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I found the same link. Who knew the Seventh Day Adventists were such trendsetters?

Update: I love me some Google Books. But "Snippet View" sucks. I want some court case to determine, once and for all, the Google is a library.

Last edited by gaffa; 04-09-2010 at 07:19 PM..
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  #33  
Old 04-10-2010, 05:59 AM
Face Intentionally Left Blank Face Intentionally Left Blank is offline
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I'm pretty sure Letterman used it way back when, probably pre-1990, when I used to watch him. I never watched the Simpsons, I definitely recall hearing it, and I think it was Letterman, in my case.
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  #34  
Old 04-10-2010, 12:55 PM
Taenia spp. Taenia spp. is offline
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OED lists 'goofball' meaning Marijuana from 1938, but referring to barbituates in 1950. The term 'hopped up' predates goofball by a couple decades, unequivocally referring to being high (on opium), found in the 1920s.
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  #35  
Old 06-15-2010, 07:56 AM
lost4life lost4life is online now
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I'm resurrecting this semi-zombie from the semi-dead.

I was watching A Cry in the Night last night on TCM (starring Natalie Wood & Raymond Burr). The movie is from 1956, and the opening scene has the police confronting a drunk. They use the line "he might be on goofballs." I immediately thought of this thread (even though they didn't say "hopped up").

Carry on!
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  #36  
Old 06-21-2010, 07:30 PM
biohazardgraphics biohazardgraphics is offline
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Originally Posted by Face Intentionally Left Blank View Post
I'm pretty sure Letterman used it way back when, probably pre-1990, when I used to watch him.
Dave: "Them hippies are hopped up on somethin'!"

Paul: "What...Were...They...On?"

Dave: "I dunno, something my Dad would say as he stumbled in out of the garage..."
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  #37  
Old 06-21-2010, 07:37 PM
Taomist Taomist is offline
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When I was in jr high and the drug edumacation was going strong, I recall thinking goofballs were some mixture of two drugs that you wouldn't normally put together. Which two, no clue. I didn't know shit about drugs until long after high school. :P Those classes just confused me.
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  #38  
Old 06-21-2010, 07:40 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is online now
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Originally Posted by Taomist View Post
When I was in jr high and the drug edumacation was going strong, I recall thinking goofballs were some mixture of two drugs that you wouldn't normally put together.
Sounds like you might be thinking of a "speedball" (heroin + cocaine).
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  #39  
Old 06-21-2010, 07:50 PM
Koxinga Koxinga is offline
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Where does Mary Jane fit into all this?
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Old 06-21-2010, 07:54 PM
Algher Algher is offline
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I remember it from Jack Lemmon's "How to Murder Your Wife."
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  #41  
Old 06-22-2010, 12:37 AM
sqweels sqweels is offline
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How common is barbiturate use, anyway? Chief Wiggum seems to imply that just about anyone--including Ned Flanders--could be found to be taking them.
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  #42  
Old 07-26-2010, 12:03 PM
puketag puketag is offline
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I created an account here after I googled this phrase.

I have been watching mystery science theater 3000 and in season 2 "Catalina Caper", Joel comments on a rather dopey looking man that "I think a certain looking teen idol is hopped up on goofballs".

This episode was in 1990 and predates the Simpsons ep. Although a lot of people today will remember it from the Simpsons and the phrase itself has probably been around for generations.
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  #43  
Old 12-08-2010, 12:11 PM
fitzt70 fitzt70 is offline
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Perry Mason Citation

The phrase "hopped up on goofballs" was stated by a witness during cross examination by Perry Mason. Episode 252, airdate 11/21/1965. Certainly not the first use but the show often tried to use exotic street lingo.
http://www.perrymasontvseries.com/wi...ePages/Show252
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  #44  
Old 12-08-2010, 12:25 PM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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Originally Posted by puketag View Post
I created an account here after I googled this phrase.

I have been watching mystery science theater 3000 and in season 2 "Catalina Caper", Joel comments on a rather dopey looking man that "I think a certain looking teen idol is hopped up on goofballs".

This episode was in 1990 and predates the Simpsons ep. Although a lot of people today will remember it from the Simpsons and the phrase itself has probably been around for generations.
I was going to mention this one. The "Dopey looking man" is Little Richard. Despite being high as a kite in that scene, he was still best part of the movie.

Joel delivered the line in an old woman's voice and Minnesota accent. I guess to reflect how square the term really was.
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  #45  
Old 12-09-2010, 12:50 AM
Sam A. Robrin Sam A. Robrin is offline
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Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
Now tell me this: I've never heard the OP's phrase in either Dragnet or The Simpsons.

But I *do* have the phrase stuck in my mind: "Hopped up on bennies and goofballs." Is that from long ago "Just Say No" propaganda?
"Bennies" were Benzedrine pills. And mocking "hopped up on goofballs" goes back as far as the early '70s, when my stoner friends and I would use it almost as often as we did "mar-ee-ju-wan-a."
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  #46  
Old 12-09-2010, 01:04 AM
not_alice not_alice is offline
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Originally Posted by jsc1953 View Post
Love the song, but Bruce should know better. No one who knows anything about baseball ever uses the word "speedball". It's a fastball, heater, Number 1, cheese.
It was written no later than the early 80s about a guy probably in his late 30s, so that means the character would have been in hs no later than the early 60s. baseball slang changes over time, esp. local slang. I grew up on the shore, next town over from Bruce actually, that lyric never struck me as "off". In fact, I thought the guy, might not even be on an organized team, it could have even been stickball or wiffleball or some games we used to play like that. Guys could definitely talk like that in their "in crowds"., esp. to distinguish a super fastball from a run of the mill one - a speedball!
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  #47  
Old 03-10-2011, 03:05 AM
LaurvaJones LaurvaJones is offline
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Hopped up on Goofballs

I just saw an episode of Perry Mason in which the murderer used that expression as an excuse for not telling the truth. Hamilton Berger also used it to describe his reason. They were 60s hipsters, in a band with matching band jackets and they partied in rented apartments where later they murdered the landlord.
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:47 AM
Koxinga Koxinga is offline
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I just saw an episode of Perry Mason in which the murderer used that expression as an excuse for not telling the truth. Hamilton Berger also used it to describe his reason. They were 60s hipsters, in a band with matching band jackets and they partied in rented apartments where later they murdered the landlord.
That wouldn't have happened to be Episode 252, airdate 11/21/1965, would it?
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  #49  
Old 01-24-2012, 09:21 PM
Ratcoon Ratcoon is offline
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I find it ironic that this websites tag line is "Fighting Ignorance Since 1973". You kids actually believe this line "hopped up on goofballs" actually originated with the Simpsons?!?! If only one person had posted it I could have looked the other way, but several people. In the same thread. Damn.
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  #50  
Old 01-24-2012, 09:52 PM
brainstall brainstall is offline
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Is 'hopped up' not a reference to hops, one of the ingredients in beer? Got nothing for the goofballs part.
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