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  #1  
Old 09-21-2009, 04:53 PM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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TV shows that changed the most between their first & last episodes

This morning I chanced to see a little bit of Angel on TNT. I didn't watch much of it--partly because the treadmill was calling, but mostly because I didn't really care for the first half of the first season of the show. But the little bit I saw made me remember how big a difference there was between the first and last episodes of the series. I don't just mean that the characters were different; though the only consistent cast member throughout the series is David Boreanez, that's nothing compared to shows like ER & Law & Order, which have entirely changed their ensembles more than once. In Angel, EVERYTHING changes over the course of the show. The show began with mostly self-contained episodes but changed to serialized arcs; the special effects grew much flashier over time; even the lighting and background music changed. In short, Season 5 Angel is hardly the same show as Season 1.

What other series is this true of?

Contrariwise, what long-running series changed the LEAST over time? (For purposes of this discussion, consider "long-running" to equal "four years or more.")

Thoughts?
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  #2  
Old 09-21-2009, 04:57 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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M*A*S*H started as a superb ensemble wartime (relatively) dark comedy. It ended as The Alan Alda Soapbox Show.

Granted, The Alan Alda Soapbox Show was better than 80% of what was on TV at the time, but still.

Last edited by KneadToKnow; 09-21-2009 at 04:58 PM..
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Old 09-21-2009, 05:05 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Ellen changed a lot from the original "These Friends Of Mine."
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  #4  
Old 09-21-2009, 05:21 PM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
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Star Trek: TNG, DS9, and Ent changed during their runs.

DS9 and Ent added in story arcs, TNG and DS9 changed how the main characters interacted with each other, Ent went from almost pure dreck to a fairly watchable series ...

I guess I should add in VOY also. It went from the Janeway as Picard Show to the Freakin' All Borg Show.
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Old 09-21-2009, 06:05 PM
B. Serum B. Serum is offline
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Seinfeld went from being everyday people musing about the impoderables of life to a group of self-absorbed phrase-makers getting into high-concept situations.
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Old 09-21-2009, 06:56 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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I always thought that it would be great for a network (Nick at Night) to play a series pilot and or first show followed by the series finale.
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:15 PM
C. Montgomery Burns C. Montgomery Burns is offline
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Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
I always thought that it would be great for a network (Nick at Night) to play a series pilot and or first show followed by the series finale.
They do that (or used to do it) on TV Land. On New Years Eve they would show the last episode, and and on New Year's Day they show the first episode.
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:18 PM
FriarTed FriarTed is offline
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Ellen changed a lot from the original "These Friends Of Mine."
I loved 'TFoM'. I liked 'Ellen'. I grew quickly tired of 'Look at Me, I'm Out of the Closet!'

I didn't watch one ep of her comeback sitcom, but she has me back with her talk show.
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:31 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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KTK took my answer.
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  #10  
Old 09-21-2009, 07:59 PM
River Hippie River Hippie is offline
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Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
Ellen changed a lot from the original "These Friends Of Mine."
Glad to see I'm not the only person that remembers the first season. I liked it better. Wasn't Jeremy Piven in it the first version?
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  #11  
Old 09-21-2009, 08:06 PM
obfusciatrist obfusciatrist is offline
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Other way around. Piven joined in the second season.
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Old 09-21-2009, 08:29 PM
River Hippie River Hippie is offline
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Other way around. Piven joined in the second season.
Yeah, Ayre Gross was the guy in the first seasons.
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  #13  
Old 09-21-2009, 08:33 PM
Andy L Andy L is offline
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Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post

What other series is this true of?
A few examples leap to mind

Dark Shadows, which started out as a soap opera featuring a spooky mansion but no supernatural elements, became a story almost entirely about a vampire (Barnabas) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Shadows

Family Ties originally focused on the parents, not on Alex.

The Facts of Life started out with Mrs. Garrett and a male headmaster dealing with the problems of about 10 girls (including Molly Ringwald) - after the first season, most of the kids left (and so did the headmaster). A new kid (Jo) arrived, and the stories thereafter were about the four kids and their interactions with Mrs. Garrett.
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  #14  
Old 09-21-2009, 08:49 PM
typoink typoink is offline
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I'd argue that the recent Battlestar Galactica could belong on this list. It started as a largely episodic action-heavy series about people surviving a war in space (and glowing sex!), and ended as a show about conflict politics, faith, redemption, and fatalism. There was a significant shift in aesthetics, too, as the show moved from gritty and loose production to shiny and tight. Color palettes, camerawork, and the very pace of the scripts shifted dramatically.

Then again, this was all done very intentionally and the transition was smooth and followed the shifting narrative. Nevertheless, I'd argue that the final episodes were a pretty far departure from the first.
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  #15  
Old 09-21-2009, 09:18 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Most shows do undergo transitions over a long run. But I'd say the champs in this were those that evolved, not only into a different concept, but also a different name.

The best example of this was Duet. The show (one of the original Fox series) was originally a romantic comedy about Ben Coleman and Laura Kelly. At the end of the second season, Ben and Laura were married and gave birth to a daughter. The first episode of the third season was set three years later. It didn't do too well, so Laura divorced Ben and joined up with her ex's best friend's wife (Alison La Placa) to be part of a real estate agency. The show was renamed Open House and was changed to feature La Placa.*

Going back, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp actually did follow (roughly) Earp's life as it changed.

*Always a mistake, since series starring La Placa had a terrible track record.
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  #16  
Old 09-21-2009, 09:19 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Buffy the Vampire Slayer started out as a one-note teen comedy. It ended as the greatest television series in American Television History.
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  #17  
Old 09-21-2009, 09:44 PM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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I think a good number of these likely owe to the "discovery" of a breakout character, like the above-mentioned Alex P. Keaton in Family Ties.

Quote:
# Arthur "The Fonz" Fonzarelli (Henry Winkler) in the American sitcom Happy Days.[2][4] The character of Fonzie started out as a fringe character but quickly evolved into the focal point of the series. His character became best friend to the main character, Richie Cunningham, displacing Potsie Webber - the character originally intended for that relationship. Winkler's billing in the credits rose all the way to second (he refused to go before Ron Howard, the star) and then first after Howard left the show to pursue directing. At one point, network executives even hoped to call the show Fonzie's Happy Days.[5]
More:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...ers#Television
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  #18  
Old 09-21-2009, 09:49 PM
Don Draper Don Draper is offline
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The original "Doctor Who" changes radically from beginning to end, and not merely the actor in the title role.

In the first year or so, the Doctor's background was completely unexplained (apart from the fact that 'his people' were obviously more scientifically advanced than Earth people of 1963). The Doctor is actually a selfish, meddling character who causes as more problems than he solves. In the first serial, he actually has to be stopped from killing someone (because the man is wounded and slowing them down from escaping their pursuers!) He has a grand-daughter (implying having a family, which was never mentioned again), and despite being the title character, he is NOT the primary hero of the series. The two main heroes are Ian & Barbara, two school-teachers who are considerably older and less sexy than the Doctors' usual traveling companions.

The series was actually intended to be an educational show for young kids. The serials alternated between science-fiction scenarios that demonstrated science & physics principles (allowing schoolteacher Ian, a science teacher, to point out interesting science facts to Susan, the teen-aged character, and by proxy the young audience) and historical settings (in which Barbara, a history teacher, could lecture about different historical events.) In fact, originally, the series was only supposed to depict historical stories.

In the original Dalek story (the first science fiction story), the travelers are stuck on the planet Skaro and need to stage a raid on the Dalek city in order to escape. Unfortunately for them, the Thals (the humanoid race living on Skaro) are complete pacifists and won't help them. Ian gives a long, impassioned speech about the need to fight for what you want, which is a far cry from the Doctor's later incarnations who express their disdain for combat in any form. At the end of that series of episodes (serials typically ran for six or seven weeks) the Daleks were utterly destroyed. There was never any mention of them being an intergalactic menace capable of nearly destroying the universe - in fact, they never left their citadel on their home planet.

The TARDIS is also a malfunctioning time machine which the Doctor cannot control. There was no way for him to predict where he would be going.
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  #19  
Old 09-21-2009, 10:05 PM
MyFootsZZZ MyFootsZZZ is online now
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"Family Matters" change dramaticly after Urkel.
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  #20  
Old 09-21-2009, 10:10 PM
audit1 audit1 is offline
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I've thought there was a world of difference between the first season of THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW and the last, (not even counting MAYBERRY RFD). Early Andy the emphasis was on comedy, and funny situations, later Andy was more character driven and less going for funny.
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  #21  
Old 09-21-2009, 10:47 PM
typoink typoink is offline
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The Simpsons hasn't ended yet, but the recent episodes are a HUGE leap from the first season. The show shifted focus from Bart to Homer a lot after the first season, but even aside from that the whole show has taken a major turn in its style and writing.
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  #22  
Old 09-22-2009, 05:27 AM
BigT BigT is offline
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Originally Posted by MyFootsZZZ View Post
"Family Matters" change dramaticly after Urkel.
But he was in the first episode...

But I get what you are saying: the show just kept changing to focus more and more on Steve and his wacky inventions. It became almost a Sci-Fi sitcom...
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  #23  
Old 09-22-2009, 05:52 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Another show that is still running but has changed completely since it started: Top Gear.

It used to be a factual and rather dry motoring magazine show. Then it turned into a jolly, laddish, boys-and-their-toys wish-fulfilment kind of programme. Sadly, in the last couple of series it has lost sight of what made it so fun and become a puerile slapstick affair in great danger of disappearing up its own exhaust manifold.
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  #24  
Old 09-22-2009, 06:53 AM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
The best example of this was Duet. The show (one of the original Fox series) was originally a romantic comedy about Ben Coleman and Laura Kelly. At the end of the second season, Ben and Laura were married and gave birth to a daughter. The first episode of the third season was set three years later. It didn't do too well, so Laura divorced Ben and joined up with her ex's best friend's wife (Alison La Placa) to be part of a real estate agency. The show was renamed Open House and was changed to feature La Placa.*
Open House was the first place I ever saw Ellen Degeneres. I watched both of those series and never thought one turned into the other.

This reminds me of the Valerie Harper Show/Hogan Family thingermabobbins.
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Old 09-22-2009, 07:04 AM
Ronald C. Semone Ronald C. Semone is offline
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All In The Family began as a sitcom involving Archie, Edith, Meathead, and Gloria which took place almost entirely in the living room of their house. It ended as a sitcom involving mainly Archie, his partner, and a few cronies and took place almost entirely in Archie's bar.
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  #26  
Old 09-22-2009, 07:14 AM
DrFidelius DrFidelius is offline
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Originally Posted by BigT View Post
But he was in the first episode...

But I get what you are saying: the show just kept changing to focus more and more on Steve and his wacky inventions. It became almost a Sci-Fi sitcom...
Correction -- Urkel didn't show up until at least half-way through the first season.
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  #27  
Old 09-22-2009, 07:49 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Open House was the first place I ever saw Ellen Degeneres. I watched both of those series and never thought one turned into the other.
It was specifically mentioned in the premier of Open House that these were the characters from Duet. I also remember Degeneres from the show, mostly with disapproval -- she had "replaced" Jodi Thelan, who was a similar character in Duet and much funnier.
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  #28  
Old 09-22-2009, 09:16 AM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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I wish they'd stuck more with the beginning concept of Angel - it's kind of a noir detective show, and it was cool. We're in I think, what, season 4 now? And I just do not give a shit who is or is not in a relationship with Fred. I will never care. No, not ever.
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  #29  
Old 09-22-2009, 09:20 AM
Odesio Odesio is offline
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Buffy the Vampire Slayer started out as a one-note teen comedy. It ended as the greatest television series in American Television History.
That doesn't really tell us how the series changed though. (I do agree that it's one of the best series though.)
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  #30  
Old 09-22-2009, 09:27 AM
footballisplayedwithyourfeet footballisplayedwithyourfeet is offline
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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Another show that is still running but has changed completely since it started: Top Gear.

It used to be a factual and rather dry motoring magazine show. Then it turned into a jolly, laddish, boys-and-their-toys wish-fulfilment kind of programme. Sadly, in the last couple of series it has lost sight of what made it so fun and become a puerile slapstick affair in great danger of disappearing up its own exhaust manifold.


I'm not sure this really qualifies as the original show stopped because of lack of succes and Clarkson strated it up again with a totally new format (as far as I remember).
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  #31  
Old 09-22-2009, 03:08 PM
TBG TBG is offline
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Lost hasn't had it's last episode yet, but it's changed a lot over the years. The first season was all about the crash survivors on a weird island, with flashbacks to their pre-island lives. Now we have
SPOILER:
Ben and the Others, Widmore, Ben's war with Widmore, Richard the guy that never ages, Jacob, whoever that other guy with Jacob was, Dharma, time travel, flashbacks, flashforwards, flashsidewayses, etc etc etc
(spoilers just in case someone who hasn't seen the show but might want to someday comes in here)

It's kind of jarring to note the differences when you watch first season episodes (or even 2nd season episodes) after you've been watching, say, 5th season episodes.
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  #32  
Old 09-22-2009, 03:35 PM
Mahna Mahna Mahna Mahna is offline
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I'd say Roseanna qualifies, since the show was barely recognizeable by the time the last season rolled around.

Tho it doesn't quite fit the OP, since the very last episode
SPOILER:
pretty much cancels out all of the stupid, unbelieveable nonsense.

Last edited by Mahna Mahna; 09-22-2009 at 03:37 PM..
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  #33  
Old 09-22-2009, 03:44 PM
MyFootsZZZ MyFootsZZZ is online now
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Correction -- Urkel didn't show up until at least half-way through the first season.

I knew he wasn't in the first episode, and I knew he showed up very early in the series; but I was still surprised it wasn't a little later than a half a season. I know because I looked on Wiki -- I guess I didn't think I started watching it that early in it's first run.

I was folding cloths a few years ago watching a rerun of one of the later seasons' episodes. It was about them going back in time. I think they were pirates. Or had to act like pirates. It was really bad.

I remember seeing a few 'Stefan Urquelle' episodes when I was a kid. I must have grown out of it before they were time-traveling pirates.

Last edited by MyFootsZZZ; 09-22-2009 at 03:48 PM..
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  #34  
Old 09-22-2009, 09:02 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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Happy Days also changed after Ron Howard left the show, after that Joanie and Chachi became bigger characters and eventually got married and their own show.
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  #35  
Old 09-23-2009, 07:03 AM
DrFidelius DrFidelius is offline
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Originally Posted by MyFootsZZZ View Post
I knew he wasn't in the first episode, and I knew he showed up very early in the series; but I was still surprised it wasn't a little later than a half a season. I know because I looked on Wiki -- I guess I didn't think I started watching it that early in it's first run.

I was folding cloths a few years ago watching a rerun of one of the later seasons' episodes. It was about them going back in time. I think they were pirates. Or had to act like pirates. It was really bad.

I remember seeing a few 'Stefan Urquelle' episodes when I was a kid. I must have grown out of it before they were time-traveling pirates.
I only remember this because I did watch the show from the beginning, and stopped when it became "All Urkel -- Al the Time." (I liked "Perfect Strangers" and this was a spin-off featuring one of the likable secondary characters.)

He was an acceptable minor character, good for a one-or-three time joke, but far too annoying to my taste to watch every week. I guess that meant I had finally aged out of the demographic the advertisers were targetting.
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  #36  
Old 09-23-2009, 07:29 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Ohh, look, some nits. Let's pick them!
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Originally Posted by lissener View Post
Buffy the Vampire Slayer started out as a one-note teen comedy. It ended as the greatest television series in American Television History.
I'd say the movie was a one-note teen comedy. I can't really remember the beginning of the TV series, but I'm not sure it was ever a one-note teen comedy.

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Originally Posted by Ronald C. Semone View Post
All In The Family began as a sitcom involving Archie, Edith, Meathead, and Gloria which took place almost entirely in the living room of their house. It ended as a sitcom involving mainly Archie, his partner, and a few cronies and took place almost entirely in Archie's bar.
Wasn't Archie's bar a completely different series/spin-off ?


Does The Daily Show count as a series? Because it's changed a lot with different hosts.
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  #37  
Old 09-23-2009, 07:46 AM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
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The Simpsons hasn't ended yet, but the recent episodes are a HUGE leap from the first season. The show shifted focus from Bart to Homer a lot after the first season, but even aside from that the whole show has taken a major turn in its style and writing.
I think The Simpsons has remained remarkably consistent for such a long-running show. Sure, the first season was kind of rough and tentative compared to later seasons; and sure, the show has had its ups and downs in quality over the years; and sure, there have been episodes, and maybe even whole seasons, that make one wonder if the writers et al lost track of what made the show great. But the show still has the same essential core of characters and settings; and the show is still capable of turning out episodes that wouldn't have been out of place well over a decade before. When a good new episode airs, there will be at least a few people who opine, "That felt like classic-era Simpsons."
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  #38  
Old 09-23-2009, 08:53 AM
caligulathegod caligulathegod is offline
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Happy Days has been mentioned, but not for its major change in tone from the first two seasons when it was a single camera, almost cinematic, more serious show to a multi-camera/filmed before a live studio audience show. Fonzie was human and kind of sad (the Christmas show where he lied about having family and was alone eating beans from a can) and there was even an episode where we learned Mrs. Cunningham was a bigot. When it went to multi-camera live audience, it became a "woo-woo" (as in where the audience "woo-woo's" entrances and kissing and stuff) show with magic Fonzie and goofy sitcom situations.
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  #39  
Old 09-23-2009, 10:18 AM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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I wish they'd stuck more with the beginning concept of Angel - it's kind of a noir detective show, and it was cool. We're in I think, what, season 4 now? And I just do not give a shit who is or is not in a relationship with Fred. I will never care. No, not ever.
That's simple madness. Amy Acker was the best thing about the series. However, I'll agree that neither Wesley nor Gunn was worthy of her.
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Old 09-23-2009, 12:31 PM
Claire Beauchamp Claire Beauchamp is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
The best example of this was Duet. The show (one of the original Fox series) was originally a romantic comedy about Ben Coleman and Laura Kelly. At the end of the second season, Ben and Laura were married and gave birth to a daughter. The first episode of the third season was set three years later. It didn't do too well, so Laura divorced Ben and joined up with her ex's best friend's wife (Alison La Placa) to be part of a real estate agency. The show was renamed Open House and was changed to feature La Placa.
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Open House was the first place I ever saw Ellen Degeneres.
LOVED Duet. In a weird sort of way. And, me too on seeing Ellen first on OH.

Here's my candidate: Two Guys, a Girl, and a Pizza Place. Started out centered in said pizza place, where said two Guys (Ryan Reynolds and Richard Ruccolo, yum on both counts) worked. David Ogden Stiers was a "regular" at the restaurant and sat alone at a table with a beer mug. The guys lived with their best friend from college, the said Girl (Suzanne Cryer). Second season, Stiers is gone. By the time the series was over, the Pizza Place was as dim memory, the show name had changed to Two Guys and a Girl, Ruccolo was with (engaged to?) Traylor Howard, Reynolds was hooking up with the insane-but-loveable woman who lived across the hall (Jillian Bach), and Cryer was living in the basement apartment with the super (Nathan Fillion, doubleyum).

I liked that show, and it was my first exposure to the boy actors, whom I've continued to adore. It's a shame it has not yet made it to DVD.

Last edited by Claire Beauchamp; 09-23-2009 at 12:31 PM..
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  #41  
Old 09-23-2009, 12:47 PM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
LOVED Duet. In a weird sort of way. And, me too on seeing Ellen first on OH.

Here's my candidate: Two Guys, a Girl, and a Pizza Place. Started out centered in said pizza place, where said two Guys (Ryan Reynolds and Richard Ruccolo, yum on both counts) worked. David Ogden Stiers was a "regular" at the restaurant and sat alone at a table with a beer mug. The guys lived with their best friend from college, the said Girl (Suzanne Cryer). Second season, Stiers is gone. By the time the series was over, the Pizza Place was as dim memory, the show name had changed to Two Guys and a Girl, Ruccolo was with (engaged to?) Traylor Howard, Reynolds was hooking up with the insane-but-loveable woman who lived across the hall (Jillian Bach), and Cryer was living in the basement apartment with the super (Nathan Fillion, doubleyum).

I liked that show, and it was my first exposure to the boy actors, whom I've continued to adore. It's a shame it has not yet made it to DVD.
Traylor Howard, now of Monk, was the Girl of the title, not Suzanne Cryer.
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  #42  
Old 09-23-2009, 01:31 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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That's simple madness. Amy Acker was the best thing about the series. However, I'll agree that neither Wesley nor Gunn was worthy of her.
You are absolutely insane. She's overly precious, her storylines are annoying, and worst of all she's excruciatingly boring! I miss the cop from the first seasons. Hell, I very much miss the Cordelia of the first few seasons. What they did with her character makes my teeth hurt.
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  #43  
Old 09-23-2009, 01:35 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
That's simple madness. Amy Acker was the best thing about the series. However, I'll agree that neither Wesley nor Gunn was worthy of her.
Fred was a waste. Illyria, OTOH, was an intriguing character that was brought on too late. Amy Acker could have done wonderful things with her, but we never got to see them.
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  #44  
Old 09-23-2009, 03:09 PM
Claire Beauchamp Claire Beauchamp is offline
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Traylor Howard, now of Monk, was the Girl of the title, not Suzanne Cryer.
oops! Thanks for the correction.
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  #45  
Old 09-23-2009, 03:33 PM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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"Walker, Texas Ranger" went from a pretty typical cop show centered on a part-Cherokee martial artist and his partner to a kid-friendly show with a message. I had stopped watching around the end of the third season but did see one episode from season six and one from season five. I can imagine someone not familiar with the show pick it up at the start of the fifth season and wonder exactly what the hell's going on. Particularly when a plot involving a Josef Mengele type in a nursing home is followed three episodes later with an orphaned boy whose only friend is a talking supercomputer that belongs in a late-60s live-action Disney movie.
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  #46  
Old 09-23-2009, 05:55 PM
x-ray vision x-ray vision is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijou Drains View Post
Happy Days also changed after Ron Howard left the show, after that Joanie and Chachi became bigger characters and eventually got married and their own show.
And they went from the Cunningham's having three children to two and all their memories of their eldest son erased.
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  #47  
Old 09-23-2009, 06:03 PM
Rubystreak Rubystreak is offline
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The X-Files changed so much. It was a creepy sci fi show whose two leads had epic chemistry as FBI agents investigating the paranormal from opposing view points. There was a mythology that was fascinating, mysterious, and engaging. By the end, the two amazing leads were replaced by dime store Indians, the myth arc was ludicrous and nonsensical, and the show was unwatchable. The show went from one of the best on TV ever to a pile of utter crap. It was very sad.
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  #48  
Old 09-23-2009, 06:16 PM
Stoid Stoid is offline
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Originally Posted by lissener View Post
Buffy the Vampire Slayer started out as a one-note teen comedy. It ended as the greatest television series in American Television History.
Only if we pretend that Season 7 never happened...
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  #49  
Old 09-23-2009, 06:21 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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Originally Posted by x-ray vision View Post
And they went from the Cunningham's having three children to two and all their memories of their eldest son erased.
That's what happens when you rape Mork from Ork.
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  #50  
Old 09-23-2009, 06:25 PM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Rubystreak View Post
The X-Files changed so much. It was a creepy sci fi show whose two leads had epic chemistry as FBI agents investigating the paranormal from opposing view points. There was a mythology that was fascinating, mysterious, and engaging. By the end, the two amazing leads were replaced by dime store Indians, the myth arc was ludicrous and nonsensical, and the show was unwatchable. The show went from one of the best on TV ever to a pile of utter crap. It was very sad.
Yup.
As I always say, it's a story of "woooo, there are things in the shadows. But WAIT ! There are things behind the things in the shadows. Here they are. But HOLD ON ! Because there are things behind the things behind the things in the shadows ! And what's more, there are th... oh, fuck it."
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