The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:11 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 14,962
Do They Charge Tax On Food Stamp Purchases

I was reading about all sorts of taxes, taxes on sugary stuff, in Chicago we have extra tax on fast food (I know you can't buy that with food stamps) and other taxes, so I got to thinking

If you buy food with food stamps do you get the tax charged too

In otherwords if I buy a loaf of bread for $1.00 and there is a 5% tax, I give the the clerk 1.05.

If I paid for that with food stamps would it be taxed?
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:36 PM
Fubaya Fubaya is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Interesting question because it wouldn't make sense to tax it, but you know how the government is. Google led me to this page. Near the bottom it says:

"By federal law, sales tax may not be charged on food purchased with food benefits. If your household purchases food with a combination of food benefits and cash, sales tax may only be charged for taxable items paid with cash."
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:36 PM
2ply 2ply is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
I know that, in Michigan, the ten cent bottle deposit is covered by the food benefit amount, so people on the benefits make a little money from returning their cans. No sales tax on grocery food here.

Also, food benefits aren't stamps anymore. They are now in the form of debit cards.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:41 PM
Claude Remains Claude Remains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Florida checking in- No. Stuff that is taxed is not to be purchaced with an EBT card. As you said, hot food from the deli, ect will not fly. My card says for example that I have $289.00 on it, I can buy for my family up to that point without figuing the tax.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:54 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 14,962
So in other words with Food Stamps (EBT), if you have $100.00 on your card, you'll be getting $100 worth of food.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:59 PM
Claude Remains Claude Remains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Yes. To the penny if your good at keeping track as you shop.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:01 PM
2ply 2ply is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Yeppers. Any unused amount rolls over to the next month, but not the next year. An extra $5 on your account on September 30 will be there on October 1, but an extra $5 on December 31 will vanish on January 1.

Last edited by 2ply; 10-10-2009 at 10:03 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:23 PM
dracoi dracoi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fubaya View Post
Interesting question because it wouldn't make sense to tax it, but you know how the government is.
As an example of how government is, Washington state collects sales tax on government (federal and state) construction projects. They're currently trying to get the federal government to pay about $5 billion to update a bridge between Seattle and Tacoma. Of that $5 billion cost, approximately $400 million will be sales tax collected by the state for its general budget. (Another 1.2 billion will be ecological and traffic impact studies, so the $5 billion bridge is really just a $3 billion bridge with a 60% bureaucracy surcharge). Gotta love it!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:43 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 19,026
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ply View Post
Also, food benefits aren't stamps anymore. They are now in the form of debit cards.
Yes, but a lot of people still call the benefit "food stamps".

Some places don't charge anyone sales tax for food (unless it's prepared food, like take out).
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:59 PM
Claude Remains Claude Remains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Gas stations Etc. are really fucked up when it comes to this. You want a hot dog off the grill (taxable) and a bottle of milk (non taxable), they will fuck you every time if you let them.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-11-2009, 12:13 AM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is offline
And Finn The Human
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 19,105
I live in Ohio where there's no tax on food (but tax on carbonated beverages). When I used to work at a grocery store with no barcode scanner (Marc's), they made a big deal out of teaching us how to ring up stuff with the right tax button. They made an even bigger deal about how to ring up "food stamp" customers properly, what couldn't be bought with food stamps (cigarettes), how to separate their order if they were paying cash for some stuff, and most importantly how not to draw attention to the fact that they were using food stamps so as not to embarrass them.

I do wonder, though, how they handle food stamps now since they are debit card based. The store still doesn't accept credit cards or have barcode scanners. Hmm...
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-11-2009, 12:20 AM
Claude Remains Claude Remains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Just like Amex, Discover, Visa, Etc. displayed on the window there will be EBT if the store accepts it.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-11-2009, 12:25 AM
Blackberry Blackberry is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ply View Post
Yeppers. Any unused amount rolls over to the next month, but not the next year. An extra $5 on your account on September 30 will be there on October 1, but an extra $5 on December 31 will vanish on January 1.
Not true. You have to not use your card at ALL for 12 months before your benefits will become unavailable. It doesn't have to do with when you received the benefits in the first place.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-11-2009, 12:33 AM
Claude Remains Claude Remains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
^ This is correct info.

Last edited by Claude Remains; 10-11-2009 at 12:34 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-11-2009, 12:41 AM
2ply 2ply is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
I was lied to!!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-11-2009, 12:55 AM
Claude Remains Claude Remains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
There are three ways to keep track of your balance. Telephone, Internet, yer brain. I have an option that lets me call an automated system 5 times per month for balance info. There is also a web site that keeps track of all purchases and balance info. I prefer to shop as needed and keep the balance in mind.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-11-2009, 03:59 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
In Wisconsin there is no state sales tax on food benefits. Most types of food are not sale taxed for anybody. Most state sales tax is on food like hot deli foods and restaurant food. The food benefits are not good for anything like rotisserie chicken or a hot sandwich so only cold food if you don't cook or you have to pay cash and sales tax. A tax on a federal level would not be included in the state forgiveness of tax as they call it. A special state sales tax could fall either way, and would need clarification when enacted. I would expect if it was called something other than state sales tax it would fall outside the state sales tax forgiven rule.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-11-2009, 04:06 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Don't confuse food benefits with WIC which is very strict and run different to ensure the child gets exactly what is needed for it instead of what the parent decides to get.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-11-2009, 05:53 AM
Reply Reply is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Arcata, CA
Posts: 7,102
In California, I don't believe unprepared food is taxed for anyone. The registers (if computerized) often have a "F" column detailing exactly the items considered "Food"(-stamp eligible), and everything else will be taxed.

You can't buy hot food with stamps, but sometimes in-store delis (in Whole Foods, for example) will prepare things fresh from the kitchen and then display them in refrigerated plastic containers... those ARE eligible for food stamps, even though they were prepared right there on-site, and stores will often even have microwaves so you can make 'em hot again. I guess that's what "eating out" would be for the subsidized.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-11-2009, 06:48 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 19,026
Most subsidized people are not wholly without access to cash. They certainly could eat out, but it would probably be Subway rather than the Ritz-Carlton. Having very little cash, it also would be a very infrequent occasion. Most of them also have friends or relatives who occasionally buy them a meal.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:02 AM
norinew norinew is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilds of WV
Posts: 10,652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reply View Post
In California, I don't believe unprepared food is taxed for anyone. The registers (if computerized) often have a "F" column detailing exactly the items considered "Food"(-stamp eligible), and everything else will be taxed.
I haven't lived in WV long enough to be familiar with how foods/groceries are taxed here. I do know that in MD, where I lived all my life, it was just like this. Cold foods/foods to be prepared elsewhere, etc. were not taxed at all.

Quote:
You can't buy hot food with stamps, but sometimes in-store delis (in Whole Foods, for example) will prepare things fresh from the kitchen and then display them in refrigerated plastic containers... those ARE eligible for food stamps
Again, that's how it is here. In fact, the Shop N' Save right around the corner from me has a large cooler in the back filled with plastic cartons of pre-made entree salads (Chef's Salad, etc) plus pieces of fried chicken, individual desserts, hot wings, etc. that the case displays a sign that says "These items MAY be purchased with food stamps". Yeah, even though it's really an EBT card now, a lot of folks still call them "food stamps".
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-11-2009, 08:25 AM
racer72 racer72 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Covington, WA
Posts: 5,377
Quote:
Originally Posted by dracoi View Post
As an example of how government is, Washington state collects sales tax on government (federal and state) construction projects. They're currently trying to get the federal government to pay about $5 billion to update a bridge between Seattle and Tacoma. Of that $5 billion cost, approximately $400 million will be sales tax collected by the state for its general budget. (Another 1.2 billion will be ecological and traffic impact studies, so the $5 billion bridge is really just a $3 billion bridge with a 60% bureaucracy surcharge). Gotta love it!
There is no bridge needed between Seattle and Tacoma, there is plenty of land. The only other project I can find is the 520 floating bridge which needs replacement. It is between Seattle and Kirkland over Lake Washington. The federal government is only being asked to help with half the cost, the rest will be paid by the state and the tolls that will be collected from the bridge. At this point about 2 billion of funding is in place, the feds have only supplied a little over 10% of that.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-11-2009, 09:46 AM
Tamex Tamex is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
I noticed last time I was at Papa Murphy's (a "take-and-bake" pizza chain where you buy unbaked pizzas and bake them at home) that there is a sign on the door that announces that they take EBT. I didn't think to look at the receipt and see if I paid sales tax or not.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-11-2009, 01:16 PM
dracoi dracoi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by racer72 View Post
There is no bridge needed between Seattle and Tacoma, there is plenty of land. The only other project I can find is the 520 floating bridge which needs replacement. It is between Seattle and Kirkland over Lake Washington. The federal government is only being asked to help with half the cost, the rest will be paid by the state and the tolls that will be collected from the bridge. At this point about 2 billion of funding is in place, the feds have only supplied a little over 10% of that.
Um... yeah... not sure how Tacoma got into my previous, since the 520 bridge is the one I was thinking of. Maybe I'm just betraying my aversion to commuting and to the 520 in particular.

I know that the funding of the bridge is still in progress and that some of the numbers have changed, but I do find it fascinating that the state is so happy to skim sales tax off the top. Even if it's paid for by the state or by tolls, it still means that 9.5% of "bridge construction funds" will wind up in the general fund as sales tax revenue.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-11-2009, 01:22 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 14,962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reply View Post

You can't buy hot food with stamps, but sometimes in-store delis (in Whole Foods, for example) will prepare things fresh from the kitchen and then display them in refrigerated plastic containers... those ARE eligible for food stamps, even though they were prepared right there on-site, and stores will often even have microwaves so you can make 'em hot again. I guess that's what "eating out" would be for the subsidized.
That's weird, for instance, at Jewel (grocer in Chicago) they will sell the hot chicken for like $6.00 a bird. If no one buys it they hack 50 or a dollar off the price and place it in the refridgerated section and mark it "Fresh Cold Chicken"

So if what the above poster said is correct (and I'll assume it is) the same chicken may go from being not OK for food stamps to OK for food stamps.

I can see where this would make a bit of sense, there are a lot of homeless people that can get food stamps. What are you supposed to do if you're living under and interstate, try to cook a raw chicken?
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-11-2009, 01:42 PM
Blackberry Blackberry is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tamex View Post
I noticed last time I was at Papa Murphy's (a "take-and-bake" pizza chain where you buy unbaked pizzas and bake them at home) that there is a sign on the door that announces that they take EBT. I didn't think to look at the receipt and see if I paid sales tax or not.
You do normally have to pay sales tax at Papa Murphy's here in WA, but if using food stamps you don't. Which is kind of odd because regular food at the grocery store is not taxed in WA, so if Papa Murphy's qualifies for food stamps it seems like it might also qualify for the sales tax exemption.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-11-2009, 01:43 PM
Blackberry Blackberry is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
Don't confuse food benefits with WIC which is very strict and run different to ensure the child gets exactly what is needed for it instead of what the parent decides to get.
Well, that's open to debate. Not everyone agrees that a ton of dairy is exactly what every child needs.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:00 PM
jtgain jtgain is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claude Remains View Post
Florida checking in- No. Stuff that is taxed is not to be purchaced with an EBT card. As you said, hot food from the deli, ect will not fly. My card says for example that I have $289.00 on it, I can buy for my family up to that point without figuing the tax.
Right, but Florida doesn't charge sales tax on ANYONE for food, except for the already prepared stuff that is ineligible for food stamp purchase.

Oh, and norinew, WV charges you 5 percent sales tax on food, 6 percent on non-food items. Enjoy your 1 dollar savings on a 100 dollar food order!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:13 PM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: A better place to be
Posts: 26,718
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ply View Post
I was lied to!!
Not necessarily. If you were told "You cannot use last year's benefits," what may have been meant is "benefits over 12 months old" while you took it to mean "benefits credited before the previous january 1."
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:22 PM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: A better place to be
Posts: 26,718
North Carolina charges 6.5% (unless it's gone up in the past year or so; I haven't checked) on non-food items and "prepared ready-to-eat food" (restaurant, fast food, deli-prepared, etc.) and 2% on foodstuffs. But anything bought on an EBT card is not taxed, even though if purchased by other means it would be subject to the 2% tax.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:24 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackberry View Post
Well, that's open to debate. Not everyone agrees that a ton of dairy is exactly what every child needs.
That is not what WIC does. They supply specific baby formulas and other needed nutritional foods to ensure the required nutritional values of the young child are met. This prevents the mother from depriving the baby for her own benefit or feeding the kid junk food with the dollars. I'm not going to debate this. Look up the program if you need facts, because they do way more than supply dairy. The only reason I brought up WIC was so it was clear my statements were not relevant to WIC which is a voucher program.

Last edited by Harmonious Discord; 10-11-2009 at 07:26 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:53 PM
norinew norinew is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilds of WV
Posts: 10,652
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtgain View Post
Oh, and norinew, WV charges you 5 percent sales tax on food, 6 percent on non-food items. Enjoy your 1 dollar savings on a 100 dollar food order!
I would have to make the two-hour drive into Maryland to enjoy that 1 dollar savings these days; hardly seems worth it, huh?
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-11-2009, 08:58 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 22,798
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackberry View Post
Well, that's open to debate. Not everyone agrees that a ton of dairy is exactly what every child needs.
However, there's lots of stuff besides dairy. This lie has been spread around pretty heavily by PETA and the Vegan community. .As I posted before in GD on 9/20 "As for WIC, you can get plenty of non-dairy. True, there's a number of dairy items on the list, but there's lots of other options. I have seen what they can get, and wiki is right on when they say "The food items provided by WIC includes: Eggs, cheese, milk, bread, peanut butter, tuna, juices, dry beans, fruits, vegetables, cereals, and infant formula." Even vegans can survive on bread, peanut butter, juices, dry beans, fruits, vegetables, & cereals. It's pretty basic, but it's doable."
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 10-11-2009, 11:02 PM
Blackberry Blackberry is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polycarp View Post
Not necessarily. If you were told "You cannot use last year's benefits," what may have been meant is "benefits over 12 months old" while you took it to mean "benefits credited before the previous january 1."
But you CAN use benefits over 12 months old. It's just that your account becomes deactivated after 12 months without use. But if you had food stamps on a card from the past and just used it to make a $1 purchase every 11 months, it would keep on being available indefinitely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
That is not what WIC does. They supply specific baby formulas and other needed nutritional foods to ensure the required nutritional values of the young child are met. This prevents the mother from depriving the baby for her own benefit or feeding the kid junk food with the dollars. I'm not going to debate this. Look up the program if you need facts, because they do way more than supply dairy. The only reason I brought up WIC was so it was clear my statements were not relevant to WIC which is a voucher program.
I used to get WIC, I know what it is.
Yes, they supply formula to infants, but for children 1-5 and pregnant or postpartum women, it's a LOT of dairy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
However, there's lots of stuff besides dairy. This lie has been spread around pretty heavily by PETA and the Vegan community. .As I posted before in GD on 9/20 "As for WIC, you can get plenty of non-dairy. True, there's a number of dairy items on the list, but there's lots of other options. I have seen what they can get, and wiki is right on when they say "The food items provided by WIC includes: Eggs, cheese, milk, bread, peanut butter, tuna, juices, dry beans, fruits, vegetables, cereals, and infant formula." Even vegans can survive on bread, peanut butter, juices, dry beans, fruits, vegetables, & cereals. It's pretty basic, but it's doable."
I'm not trying to say it's ONLY dairy, but that is a very large part of it. You presumably don't know the amounts of each food so from a list I can see where it doesn't look so heavy on the dairy, but when I got it anyway, it was an insane amount of dairy. We could never use it all. There is room for debate on some of the other foods too, like juice for infants.
I've never heard of anyone on WIC getting bread, but maybe somewhere they do. And the fruits and vegetables are very limited, if at all. That's one thing i think is really a mistake.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 10-12-2009, 12:03 AM
Bambi Hassenpfeffer Bambi Hassenpfeffer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtgain View Post
Right, but Florida doesn't charge sales tax on ANYONE for food, except for the already prepared stuff that is ineligible for food stamp purchase.
Not quite accurate. Florida doesn't charge tax on a lot of food items, but does on quite a few.

Sodas are taxed, but chips aren't. Some ice cream is taxed but most isn't and I haven't figured out the pattern yet over my years in grocery.

Anything purchased from the bakery is non-taxable.

Things purchased in the deli are taxable provided they are prepared in store and/or served hot unless they're not. Deli sandwiches? Taxable food, and eligible for EBT. Deli chicken served hot? Taxable food, not eligible for EBT. Same deli chicken, after it's chilled and repacked? Non-taxable food, so no tax charged to anybody.

No produce items are taxable, even the stuff that's prepared in-store, like the salads and fruit mixes -- unless a fork or spoon is attached, because then it's "prepared" food and is therefore taxable.

If you shop at my chain in Florida, you can look at your receipt and there will be codes on each line. It will say T, F, H, P, or T F, for Taxable, Food, Healthcare, Prescriptions, and Taxable Food.

Anything tagged F or T F is EBT-eligible. Anything tagged just T is not. Anything tagged P or H can be paid for with your FSA (pre-tax health care spending account) card.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 09-25-2012, 10:25 AM
Davz Davz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
That is not what WIC does. They supply specific baby formulas and other needed nutritional foods to ensure the required nutritional values of the young child are met. This prevents the mother from depriving the baby for her own benefit or feeding the kid junk food with the dollars. I'm not going to debate this. Look up the program if you need facts, because they do way more than supply dairy. The only reason I brought up WIC was so it was clear my statements were not relevant to WIC which is a voucher program.
You are incorrect. WIC will telll you that you HAVE to purchase 3 gallons of milk for your 2 children who are allergic to milk. And they will also tell you that you HAVE to buy a 64oz carton of Orange Juice, despite the fact that Orange Juice no longer (or EXTERMELY rarely) can be found in a 64oz carton. They will also tell you that you can't buy whole grain bread of brand X, but brand Y is ok, despite being $2 more expensive and having high fructose corn syrup in it.

OH, and the only milk you can buy has to have bovine growth hormone in it, because we all know that's good for kids, right? And they expect yous kids to go through 6 gallons of milk a week.

Please before telling someone else that they're wrong, recheck your facts. And, if that fails, try smacking your face against the wall before posting. The other poster's assessment was quite accurate. (They'll also tell you that you HAVE to get 16oz of peanut butter a week, despite your kids allergy to peanuts, which generally ends up being left outside the supermarket)

Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 09-25-2012, 11:33 AM
postcards postcards is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: The other Long Beach.
Posts: 3,061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davz View Post
You are incorrect. WIC will telll you that you HAVE to purchase 3 gallons of milk for your 2 children who are allergic to milk. And they will also tell you that you HAVE to buy a 64oz carton of Orange Juice, despite the fact that Orange Juice no longer (or EXTERMELY rarely) can be found in a 64oz carton. They will also tell you that you can't buy whole grain bread of brand X, but brand Y is ok, despite being $2 more expensive and having high fructose corn syrup in it.

OH, and the only milk you can buy has to have bovine growth hormone in it, because we all know that's good for kids, right? And they expect yous kids to go through 6 gallons of milk a week.

Please before telling someone else that they're wrong, recheck your facts. And, if that fails, try smacking your face against the wall before posting. The other poster's assessment was quite accurate. (They'll also tell you that you HAVE to get 16oz of peanut butter a week, despite your kids allergy to peanuts, which generally ends up being left outside the supermarket)

Thank you.
Speaking of facts, please provide a cite for your assertions.

Orange juice, for example, is commonly available in a 64 ounce (aka half gallon) container.

Oh, and post reported for the second sentence in your penultimate paragraph.
__________________
Talking Pictures
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:08 PM
SubaRhubarb SubaRhubarb is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Hi Davs. You are wrong. You are not Required to get all the items listed on each check, and if you speak to your caseworker they will usually try to substitute items within each category. Dried beans can be issued in place of peanut butter. Tuna also.

No they do not allow for purchase of organic (or zombie) milk, but you can buy frozen concentrated juiced that make 64 oz. Note, it is Up to 64 oz, you can get the 59ozers.

I recall in Penna they had vouchers for produce specifically for farmers markets.

http://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/Contacts...yfoodlists.htm

Last edited by SubaRhubarb; 09-25-2012 at 12:10 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:17 PM
SubaRhubarb SubaRhubarb is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Too slow to edit. I see that at least Arkansas allows soy milk. Other States may also. Do your own research if needed.

" WIC foods include iron-fortified infant formula, infant cereal, infant baby food fruits and vegetables, iron-fortified adult cereal, vitamin C-rich juice, milk, cheese, eggs, whole grains, dried or canned beans, fruits and vegetables, peanut butter, and canned fish. Special infant formulas may be provided when prescribed by a physician for a specific medical condition. A soy-based beverage is also available as a milk alternative; however a prescription is required for children."


http://www.healthy.arkansas.gov/prog...s/WICFAQS.aspx
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:59 PM
Omar Little Omar Little is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
But zombies don't pay any tax on the brains they eat paid for with food stamps, WIC cards, or even cash!!
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 09-25-2012, 03:21 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 32,360
I'm in New Jersey, and when I had an EBT card, the taxes were not added to any purchases made for food or cash benefits. I saved about $300 in taxes that year.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.