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  #1  
Old 11-07-2009, 09:49 AM
Nom_de_Plume Nom_de_Plume is offline
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What was Ebenezer Scrooge's Job

I just saw the IMAX 3D film Disney's A Christmas Carol. The movie referenced the office where Scrooge and Cratchett worked as being the 'counting house.' Did they provide mortgages or something. I remember reading the book when I was younger, but don't remember if the issue was addressed.
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2009, 10:00 AM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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Originally Posted by Nom_de_Plume View Post
I just saw the IMAX 3D film Disney's A Christmas Carol. The movie referenced the office where Scrooge and Cratchett worked as being the 'counting house.' Did they provide mortgages or something. I remember reading the book when I was younger, but don't remember if the issue was addressed.
I refuse to watch the Disney version on account of it being Disney and involving Jim Carrey. That said, Scrooge is certainly a moneylender in most versions of the story, as one of the things he tends to do after his reformation is forgive a lot of debts. That's what the "Thank You Very Much" song is all about, after all.
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:02 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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I don't remember if it's in the book, but at least in a film Scrooge runs a 'counting house'; which is a company's accounting section. Since the business was independently owned, perhaps Scrooge was an accountant. But I don't recall him doing accounting for other firms. It's possible he was a money lender. In one scene he raises the price of corn (American: grain), and the buyers say that he will be left with a warehouse full of corn he can't sell. Scrooge says that's his concern, not the buyers'. So it sounds to me as if he was a commodities trader.
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:07 AM
running coach running coach is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
I don't remember if it's in the book, but at least in a film Scrooge runs a 'counting house'; which is a company's accounting section. Since the business was independently owned, perhaps Scrooge was an accountant. But I don't recall him doing accounting for other firms. It's possible he was a money lender. In one scene he raises the price of corn (American: grain), and the buyers say that he will be left with a warehouse full of corn he can't sell. Scrooge says that's his concern, not the buyers'. So it sounds to me as if he was a commodities trader.
I think in the Albert Finney version(the musical) he is shown collecting payments on mortgages/notes he holds on various street vendors' carts.
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:08 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Originally Posted by runner pat View Post
I think in the Albert Finney version(the musical)...
I don't recall seeing that version.
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:18 AM
running coach running coach is offline
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I don't recall seeing that version.
This one.
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:52 AM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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Originally Posted by runner pat View Post
I think in the Albert Finney version(the musical) he is shown collecting payments on mortgages/notes he holds on various street vendors' carts.
You misspelled "the greatest movie of all time," runner pat.
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  #8  
Old 11-07-2009, 04:23 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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The book never tells what he does, though it's implied strongly he lends money and at a high rate of interest. So one is left to wonder since usuary wasn't the thing back then, if Scrooge had a legal business and/or operated a "loan shark" type operation on the side.

The book is pretty straighforward and it really doesn't go into all the reason's Scrooge is like he is. All the book shows is that he goes from being a realatively happy-go-lucky clerk to being more obsessed with money with each flashback visit.

I've seen other versions attempt to pass Scrooge off as a product of his life, for instance, in one version I saw Scrooge's father go to jail for not paying a debt, thus rationalizing Scrooges obsession with never being poor. The book is pretty straightforward though and doesn't give as many details as most versions do
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Old 11-07-2009, 04:41 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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I refuse to watch the Disney version on account of it being Disney and involving Jim Carrey.
Are we thinking of the same movie? Mickey Mouse as Cratchett? Scrooge McDuck in the lead? Wasn't that long before Jim Carrey's time?
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  #10  
Old 11-07-2009, 04:43 PM
Indistinguishable Indistinguishable is offline
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That's the old Disney version, of which I have fond memories. However, there's another one coming out just now (in 3-D) that has Jim Carrey in it.

Last edited by Indistinguishable; 11-07-2009 at 04:45 PM..
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  #11  
Old 11-07-2009, 05:09 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
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That's the old Disney version, of which I have fond memories. However, there's another one coming out just now (in 3-D) that has Jim Carrey in it.
No there isn't. Robert Zemeckis never made a movie of The Polar Express, either.
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  #12  
Old 11-07-2009, 06:53 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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The Alastair Sim version (the best ever) shows Scrooge and Marley buying up bankrupt companies at a fraction of their value. Presumably, the sold off the assets. There was also moneylending and trading commodities.
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  #13  
Old 11-07-2009, 06:56 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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I like the George C. Scott version best.
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  #14  
Old 11-07-2009, 06:59 PM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is online now
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I hereby decalre all versions to be the best, except for the ones that were the worst.
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Old 11-07-2009, 07:07 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Dickens' own father was thrown into debtors' prison when Charles was just a young lad, bringing his childhood to a nasty and abrupt end and throwing him into the wonderful world of Victorian-era child labor. That probably influenced the story line quite a bit.
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Old 11-07-2009, 08:46 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Scrooge and Marley was more or less a privately-owned bank that made loans at seemed fairly outrageous rates and terms. Seems as if it were perfectly normal for individuals to have to suffer with such terrible financial terms. But then, here we are with "payday loan" outfits charging 98% interest or worse.

In their youth, the two worked for Fezziwig, who was a wholesaler and/or distributor.
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  #17  
Old 11-07-2009, 08:55 PM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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Would the modern equivalent be a "finance company"? That is, a firm whose business is simply buying and selling financial instruments of all kinds- mortgages, bonds, etc.? I forget the source but in one movie I once saw a new guy asks "what does the company actually make?" and the reply is "we make money".
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  #18  
Old 11-07-2009, 10:13 PM
Jolly Roger Jolly Roger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
The Alastair Sim version (the best ever) shows Scrooge and Marley buying up bankrupt companies at a fraction of their value. Presumably, the sold off the assets. There was also moneylending and trading commodities.
That version rules! It is a tradition for me and my wife to watch it alt least once before Xmas.
That being said, I always wondered exactly what Scrooge's business was.
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  #19  
Old 11-07-2009, 10:19 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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I hereby decalre all versions to be the best, except for the ones that were the worst.
"It was the best of Dickens film adaptations, it was the worst of Dickens film adaptations...."
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:31 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
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As usurers, were Scrooge and Marley Jewish?
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  #21  
Old 11-07-2009, 10:31 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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That's the old Disney version, of which I have fond memories. However, there's another one coming out just now (in 3-D) that has Jim Carrey in it.
Ah, OK, I was thinking they were just 3D-ifying the Mickey version. Which, come to think of it, might be tricky with cell animation.

And for the record, the best version is clearly the one put on by the Whitney Young Junior High School drama club in fall of 1989. Although I might be biased.
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Old 11-08-2009, 08:22 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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Originally Posted by dropzone View Post
As usurers, were Scrooge and Marley Jewish?
Since his family celebrates Christmas I would say no.
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  #23  
Old 11-08-2009, 08:27 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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I guess I'll be unfashionable and say that I liked this version. I'm not one of the cool Dopers. If you see it make sure you go to a theater that has it in 3D. I can see how it will lose a lot on TV or in 2D.

This seemed to be a pretty straight forward adaptation of the book. There is one thing in the movie I had a question about. Maybe it was in the book too. The ghost of Christmas present says something about having many brothers. Something like 1842 brothers. What does that mean? Did I miss something?
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  #24  
Old 11-08-2009, 08:31 AM
running coach running coach is offline
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Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
The book never tells what he does, though it's implied strongly he lends money and at a high rate of interest. So one is left to wonder since usuary wasn't the thing back then, if Scrooge had a legal business and/or operated a "loan shark" type operation on the side.
He did have Bob Cratchit as his clerk, keeping up the records so at least some of his business was legal and "on the books".
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Old 11-08-2009, 08:31 AM
Rayne Man Rayne Man is offline
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I guess I'll be unfashionable and say that I liked this version. I'm not one of the cool Dopers. If you see it make sure you go to a theater that has it in 3D. I can see how it will lose a lot on TV or in 2D.

This seemed to be a pretty straight forward adaptation of the book. There is one thing in the movie I had a question about. Maybe it was in the book too. The ghost of Christmas present says something about having many brothers. Something like 1842 brothers. What does that mean? Did I miss something?
One for each year since the birth of Christ.
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  #26  
Old 11-08-2009, 10:13 AM
Tim R. Mortiss Tim R. Mortiss is offline
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As usurers, were Scrooge and Marley Jewish?
I think Marley was Jamaican.
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  #27  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:32 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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One for each year since the birth of Christ.
There you go. For some reason I thought it was set latter than that.
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  #28  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:42 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Originally Posted by Loach View Post
There you go. For some reason I thought it was set latter than that.
The book was published in 1843.

As for the number, here's the relevant text (my emphasis):
Quote:
"You have never seen the like of me before!" exclaimed the Spirit.

"Never," Scrooge made answer to it.

"Have never walked forth with the younger members of my family; meaning (for I am very young) my elder brothers born in these later years?" pursued the Phantom.

"I don't think I have," said Scrooge. "I am afraid I have not. Have you had many brothers, Spirit?"

"More than eighteen hundred," said the Ghost.
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  #29  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:51 AM
Randy Seltzer Randy Seltzer is online now
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Originally Posted by dropzone View Post
As usurers, were Scrooge and Marley Jewish?
Some people think
that Ebenezer Scrooge is.
Well he's not. But guess who is?
All three Stooges!
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  #30  
Old 11-08-2009, 01:39 PM
Serenata67 Serenata67 is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
I think Marley was Jamaican.
Jamaican isn't a religion, it's a nationality. It's like saying, "Are they Hindu? No, they're Canadian."

I think the joke you were trying to make was "I think Marley was Rastafarian."
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  #31  
Old 11-08-2009, 01:48 PM
DooWahDiddy DooWahDiddy is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
I think Marley was Jamaican.
A friend of mine was having a conversation with someone on Facebook and said something about "that ghost in Christmas Carol, Bob Marley". I replied, "Sorry to eavesdrop, but I just had to point out the hilarious vision of a reggae-playing rastaman ghost with chains around his head. :-)"

That was a year ago and we still crack up about it.

ETA: Posted this before I saw Serenata67's post. Score!

Last edited by DooWahDiddy; 11-08-2009 at 01:49 PM..
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  #32  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:57 PM
ouryL ouryL is offline
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Actually, it is a fairly good adaption. I actually read the book. The drawing of the Ghost of Christmas Past as candle-like was spot on. Bob Cratchit's story is pushed back out of prominence-after all-this is Scrooge's story. Animation makes the actors better actors in that the emotions portrayed are mimicked by how the characters are drawn.
This movie is too dark for young kids, but it draws you into it. A cue taken from TV or perhaps it was originally proposed as 3D.
I must say I enjoyed it, in spite of myself. But then again, I admit Mr. Magoo's is still my favorite adaption.
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  #33  
Old 11-08-2009, 04:01 PM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Jamaican isn't a religion, it's a nationality. It's like saying, "Are they Hindu? No, they're Canadian."

I think the joke you were trying to make was "I think Marley was Rastafarian."
"Bah! Humbug!"
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  #34  
Old 11-08-2009, 04:53 PM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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No love for the Muppet version?
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Old 11-08-2009, 06:00 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
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No love for the Muppet version?
Which featured the Marley brothers, Jacob and Bob.
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  #36  
Old 11-09-2009, 02:03 AM
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Ah, OK, I was thinking they were just 3D-ifying the Mickey version. Which, come to think of it, might be tricky with cell animation.
Well, I can't blame you. CG Mickey has been around since 2003. (I'm excluding his PS2 version) I would've assumed they were going to redo the film in CG. 3D cell shading would be quite difficult to pull off.

As is written in the article linked above, Mickey's most recent voice actor, Wayne Allwine is now deceased. His film debut as Mickey was in Mickey's Christmas Carol. I hope this doesn't mean his voice witll change. (Unlike Donald, whose modern voice actor was hand picked and coached by his predecessor, Mickey's new voice actor was picked after his predecessor's death.)

Quote:
And for the record, the best version is clearly the one put on by the Whitney Young Junior High School drama club in fall of 1989. Although I might be biased.
Ah, the same reason I prefer the one I was in at church?

Actually, ours was quite different. It was a modified version where God himself speaks to Scrooge instead of Marley, and the other three ghosts are replaced with angels. (The Angel of Christmas Future is still creepy, as he's essentially the Angel of Death). It's not that unpopular a version, but I can't find clips online that show any differences.
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  #37  
Old 11-09-2009, 07:41 AM
si_blakely si_blakely is offline
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But then again, I admit Mr. Magoo's is still my favorite adaption.
Blackadders Christmas Carol is mine.

Si
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  #38  
Old 11-09-2009, 07:57 AM
Mr. Miskatonic Mr. Miskatonic is offline
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No there isn't. Robert Zemeckis never made a movie of The Polar Express, either.
You mean that horror movie set in the Uncanny Valley? It exists, but why they released such a terrifying movie around the holidays instead of Halloween is beyond me.
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  #39  
Old 11-09-2009, 08:41 AM
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"Bah! Humbug!"
Jah. Jah. Jah. Humbug.
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