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  #1  
Old 01-04-2010, 07:24 AM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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Adopting a pet: What to expect from a home visit?

Through Petfinder.com, I've found a dog that I'm interested in adopting (a sweet black pug rescued from euthanasia at a different shelter). I filled out the application and the rescue organization seems interested, but I have to submit to a home visit (their policy for all adoptions, it seems).

Even though the shelter is well out of my state, they say they have a volunteer in my area.

What can I expect from such a home visit? Are they looking for anything in particular?
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  #2  
Old 01-04-2010, 09:05 AM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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They likely will look to see if you have a fenced backyard (or a yard at all), if your stairs are to code (pugs are susceptible to back injuries if they take even short falls, and you'll want to make sure there is adequate protection -- a baby gate in evidence would be a good idea if you have stairs), no piles of electrical cords around that could be chew hazards, general cleanliness, and you should have have thought about the answers to some obvious questions -- if the inspector asks where the dog will sleep, don't be caught with a glazed look in your eyes. Be prepared to show a proper spot, in a nice place like the kitchen or bedroom, not in the garage or basement. Have thought about how often you plan to walk the dog and that you have a veterinarian lined up or at least know of one. Show where the dog's water and food will be.

If you have not owned a dog before, show that you have resources for advice and especially for pugs, who sometimes have special needs because of their brachycephalic physiology and the diseases that they are prone to. You could buy or borrow a book from the library about pugs and read it and tell her that you are aware of these issues.

Congratulations!
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  #3  
Old 01-04-2010, 10:31 AM
Athena Athena is offline
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I don't have any advice on a home visit, but I thought I'd just stop by and get all giddy over a new pug! My two pugs thank you for rescuing yours!
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  #4  
Old 01-04-2010, 10:37 AM
Oakminster Oakminster is offline
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Wow. I'm pretty impressed a rescue organization will do a home visit prior to adopting an animal out. Don't think I've ever heard of such a thing. Druids are obviously great with animals, so you'll pass with flying colors. Karana and Tunare smile upon your efforts.
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:38 AM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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I went and looked up "black pug" and found this. I'm not a dog person, but that's pretty damned cute.

Sorry, I don't know much about a home visit either. I'd like to think that they're just doing a general check to make sure you're not going to be using the little guy for dog-fighting or something.
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  #6  
Old 01-04-2010, 10:42 AM
Katriona Katriona is offline
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We adopted a pug mix in June, and the visit was mostly checking out our fence and making sure he got on with our other dogs. He stayed with us immediately, but we'd also filled out a pretty comprehensive application, so I assume they'd talked to our vet and all that before meeting us.

Congrats! Our neighbors have a black pug and he's just precious.

Last edited by Katriona; 01-04-2010 at 10:43 AM..
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:43 AM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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Thanks!

Quote:
They likely will look to see if you have a fenced backyard (or a yard at all)
I'm a little nervous about this - I don't have a fenced yard, but I was very clear about this in my application. I live very close to a dog park though and my sister, who I visit often (at least once a week) has one. I do have a yard though and explained that I planned to walk the dog. One of the reasons I'm attracted to a pug is because I'm experienced with them and know that they tend to not require long runs outside.

Quote:
...if your stairs are to code (pugs are susceptible to back injuries if they take even short falls, and you'll want to make sure there is adequate protection -- a baby gate in evidence would be a good idea if you have stairs)
Interesting point, one that I had not considered. Hopefully I should be OK on this. I plan to gate off the basement unless supervised so the pug would not be going up and down stairs except just 3 or 4 to the door to go outside.

Quote:
If you have not owned a dog before, show that you have resources for advice and especially for pugs, who sometimes have special needs because of their brachycephalic physiology and the diseases that they are prone to. You could buy or borrow a book from the library about pugs and read it and tell her that you are aware of these issues.
My sister has a pug as well. Should I ask her to be present with her dog? I have spent a lot of time with her, including even going to her obedience classes, and the two dogs would spend a lot of time together.
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:16 AM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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It should be OK that you don't have a fenced yard as long as you have been clear with them. We had this same situation when we adopted our first corgi: our back yard wasn't fenced, though we told the rescue inspector we planned to do it and we have since done so. About the stairs, it also should be OK there -- just remarking that you have planned to gate off the basement ought to be fine.

Did you have to give references? If so, and you weren't able to give your sister as a reference because she's related to you, I would just say that your sister is a pug owner and therefore you are experienced with them and their potential health issues. I don't see any reason why she should (or shouldn't) be present -- couldn't hurt, might help, especially if the dog is very well behaved. If you have air conditioning, I'd point that out because pugs suffer in the heat (don't know how hot it gets in West Des Moines, but it just would be another sign that you know what you are doing).
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  #9  
Old 01-04-2010, 11:28 AM
Athena Athena is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
I went and looked up "black pug" and found this. I'm not a dog person, but that's pretty damned cute.
That looks pretty much exactly like my lil' black guy.

As far as stairs... I've never heard that before. We have a two story house, and our two pugs are up and down the stairs about a million and a half times a day. Doesn't seem to have hurt them at all.

I did have to teach both of them to go up and down stairs when they were puppies. Stairs are pretty tall when you're a tiny pug puppy! I'd put treats on each step and they learned pretty quickly.

Another good pic - my mother got me a pug puppy calendar for Christmas, and a closeup of this little guy is the January picture. Squeee!
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  #10  
Old 01-04-2010, 11:39 AM
Hanna Hanna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post

Sorry, I don't know much about a home visit either. I'd like to think that they're just doing a general check to make sure you're not going to be using the little guy for dog-fighting or something.
Another reason is to make sure you're not an animal hoarder.

I've adopted two animals in the past few years from shelters and while I had to fill out an application, including my vet info, I didn't have to go though a home visit.
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  #11  
Old 01-04-2010, 11:42 AM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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No, going up and down stairs usually isn't a problem for a healthy younger dog. Falling down stairs, now that's a problem! Some people live in older homes where the railings are too far apart, and dogs can slip in between and fall over a balcony or something. That's why I said the inspector might check to see if the stairs are "to code."

As Cat Whisperer noted, the inspector likely will be mostly checking to see if fluiddruid is sincere and not a dog broker or something. Even if there were a problem, they surely would allow time to correct it rather than nixing the adoption outright.
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  #12  
Old 01-04-2010, 12:01 PM
pbbth pbbth is offline
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I always thought the home visits for adopting pets were a bit over the top. Then I saw the episode of Hoarders where the woman had 2 cats she thought had run away but in fact had died when they got trapped in the clutter and they decayed to nothing but fur and bones and she never even noticed. I now completely understand having a home visit before allowing someone to adopt a pet.
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  #13  
Old 01-04-2010, 12:36 PM
Hanna Hanna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbbth View Post
I always thought the home visits for adopting pets were a bit over the top. Then I saw the episode of Hoarders where the woman had 2 cats she thought had run away but in fact had died when they got trapped in the clutter and they decayed to nothing but fur and bones and she never even noticed. I now completely understand having a home visit before allowing someone to adopt a pet.
How awful!

Some places want to make 100% certain that the animal is not going back into an even worse situation than what they came out of, and I can see their point.
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  #14  
Old 01-04-2010, 12:44 PM
Pyper Pyper is offline
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When I was a kid, the Greyhound Pets of America sent a couple of people and a couple of greyhounds over for a home visit when my family expressed interest in adopting a greyhound. There wasn't any serious home inspection-- they just sat and chatted with my parents about the special needs of greyhounds, the do's and don't's, and all that. I also got the feeling they wanted to make sure my sister and I were mellow kids who knew how to treat dogs and wouldn't freak out the poor greyhounds, who tend to be shy and gentle types.
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  #15  
Old 01-04-2010, 01:52 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Why would you be nervous? If they don't approve you go to, I don't know a million other place and get another dog. What am I missing here? It's not like there aren't thousands of animals that need a good home.
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  #16  
Old 01-04-2010, 02:06 PM
Hanna Hanna is offline
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Maybe she has her heart set on *that* dog. I was attached to my pup immediately after I saw his picture on Petfinder. I held my breath until I heard back that he hadn't been adopted yet.
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  #17  
Old 01-04-2010, 02:12 PM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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I had a home visit when my house was undergoing MAJOR renovations and was in shambles.

We still got approved.
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  #18  
Old 01-04-2010, 02:28 PM
badbadrubberpiggy badbadrubberpiggy is offline
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I doubt you have anything to worry about.

They're not usually looking for perfection, they're checking to see if it's a healthy environment, and that you don't have more pets than you & your home can support. They'll probably want to know the basic things like where the dog will sleep & eat, and what it's access to exercise and the outdoors will be like.

I don't think the fact that you don't have a fenced yard will count against you - you do have access to a dog park and you'll have him outdoors plenty. A fenced yard isn't a requirement, though they usually do look at the fence if you plan to let the dog out on it's own, to check for safety.

In addition to hoarding & breeding/fighting (who'd get a pug for a fighting dog, anyway?) concerns, they also want to make sure you can take care of the dog, and won't be bringing him back to the shelter in a few weeks. Sure, they'd take him back, but shelters don't usually have a lot of open spaces and they'd rather the dog or cat just go to a good home the first time around.
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  #19  
Old 01-04-2010, 03:22 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badbadrubberpiggy View Post
<snip>
In addition to hoarding & breeding/fighting (who'd get a pug for a fighting dog, anyway?) <snip>
{Foghorn Leghorn}That was a joke, son.{/FL} (So is this - I'm pretty sure you're a girl. )
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  #20  
Old 01-04-2010, 05:16 PM
perfectparanoia perfectparanoia is offline
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Wow! That sounds more intense than the home visit we had for adopting our children...
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  #21  
Old 01-04-2010, 06:22 PM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Can you go to the website of the rescue that will be doing the home inspection and look to see if they have a list of requirements (fenced yard, no children or maximum number of children, other pets, etc.)? Some do have a list, and even some that don't might make clear from other postings on their site whether something is considered a plus or a minus.
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Old 01-04-2010, 07:42 PM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
Why would you be nervous? If they don't approve you go to, I don't know a million other place and get another dog. What am I missing here? It's not like there aren't thousands of animals that need a good home.
Well, they're gonna, like, judge me.

Actually it's because I'd really like to get one of a short list of breeds that I am very confident I can take care of well without a fenced backyard and based on my lifestyle. Plus, after lugging around a basset hound with a bum leg for months, I really want a small dog. Playful + small + not yappy + not too anxious + shorthaired = pug, Boston, Frenchie, etc. Also, I've rather fallen in love with my sister's dog... a black pug, wouldn't you guess.

If I had more space, I'd go for your standard mutt from the city pound kind of dog, but with purebreds, they tend to be very choosy.

Well... and to admit it, yeah, I am already sort of emotionally attached based on the dog's webpage. I squealed like a little girl when I saw the picture, and I'm not really the squealing type!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailboat
Can you go to the website of the rescue that will be doing the home inspection and look to see if they have a list of requirements (fenced yard, no children or maximum number of children, other pets, etc.)?
Sure, I did that. They have few requirements but they say they seldom adopt without a fenced yard. I'm hoping that I'd be an exception, so I filled out the (lengthy) application. They did contact me anyways, but I'm still concerned.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2010, 07:47 PM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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And in case anyone's wondering why I'm so set on this dog, I present:

My sister's pug.

(The traditional noise to make when viewing this picture: Ggggggyyyyoohhhhhhhhhhhhhh!)
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2010, 08:10 PM
StGermain StGermain is offline
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My friend recently adopted a greyhound through Greyhound Pets of America, and she went through a long application process. The home visit was when they brought three dogs over. If one of the dogs clicked, and everything looked okay in the home (fenced yard a requirement for a greyhound), then the chosen dog would stay.

StG
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  #25  
Old 01-04-2010, 08:20 PM
Athena Athena is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluiddruid View Post
And in case anyone's wondering why I'm so set on this dog, I present:

My sister's pug.

(The traditional noise to make when viewing this picture: Ggggggyyyyoohhhhhhhhhhhhhh!)
Ggggggyyyyoohhhhhhhhhhhhhh! Ggggggyyyyoohhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

Oh. My. God.

I had to print that out and bring down to Mr. Athena, who is on the couch recovering from a bad food poisoning kind of thing. It brought a big smile to his face - that's what pugs do!

So here's my baby pictures. The fawn one is on my debit/check card; it gets "Gggggyyyooooohhhh!"s every time I use it.

Black boy

Fawn girl.
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  #26  
Old 01-04-2010, 09:10 PM
Katriona Katriona is offline
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Dear lord, the cute is strong in this thread!

Here's my pug/beagle mix playing with his "cousin," our neighbor's pug:

http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...5&l=58984ccf3f
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  #27  
Old 01-05-2010, 11:48 AM
congodwarf congodwarf is offline
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Thanks for this thread. I'm actually sitting here, waiting anxiously for the caseworker to call about a trio of dogs we fell in love with.

We definitely want one of them but we're strongly leaning towards two. They are German Shepherd mix. Sisters. Sooooo cute. My boyfriend has a very soft spot in his heart for German Shepherds and I love all big dogs.

We filled out the application on Sunday and it said it can take 2 days for them to call. They haven't called yet!!! I'm feeling inadequate!

I found a lot of dogs on Petfinder.com that I liked but when I showed the boyfriend one of the sisters, he practically squeed. That was my signal to fill out the application. He has since seen pics of all three and he said he doesn't care which we get but he wants at least one of them.



We don't have a fenced yard yet. But, the house is open and our new baby will have the run of it. Exercise will come from walks and trips to the park. My main concern from a home visit is the stairs. They lead to the attic and loft and I'm not sure how I'd be able to block them off. I plan to ask the home inspector for their input on that.

We don't have a vet yet though and we're both new to the area. We don't know anyone who lives here either so we're at a loss as to how to find a good vet. How does one go about finding a good school too?

I made sure I put on the application that we don't have a fence and I also let them know we'll be out of the state next week. The girls need to be shipped up here anyway so I hope it's not a problem.
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  #28  
Old 01-05-2010, 12:12 PM
Anne Neville Anne Neville is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluiddruid View Post
And in case anyone's wondering why I'm so set on this dog, I present:

My sister's pug.

(The traditional noise to make when viewing this picture: Ggggggyyyyoohhhhhhhhhhhhhh!)
SQUEEE! Pug! Izzou a cute widdle baby DOG? Yes ou IS!

I'm sure your new pug will be equally squee-worthy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Markxxx
Why would you be nervous? If they don't approve you go to, I don't know a million other place and get another dog. What am I missing here? It's not like there aren't thousands of animals that need a good home.
You wouldn't feel you had been judged and found inadequate if a shelter visited your house and declared you unworthy to adopt one of their dogs?

You're a lot less sensitive to rejection than I am, if that wouldn't make you feel bad.

Got any tips on how to make yourself not feel bad when someone judges and rejects you? Seriously. I would love to not care.
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  #29  
Old 01-05-2010, 05:51 PM
congodwarf congodwarf is offline
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Yaaaay!!!!!!!


I finally got the call from Good Dogs!!! Our caseworker was happy with our application and he's putting my boyfriend's favorite on hold for us. He is sending me an email with contact info for the foster mom so I can call her and get personal information about the puppy. He said she has the sister dog that I want too. I talked to my boyfriend and he said absolutely get them both!!!!!

The caseworker said he has to get approval from the administrators for us to adopt and he needs special approval for two dogs but we're finally on our way!

He said that starting now, they will be available on the 16th (they have to be transported). This is perfect because we get back from Florida on the 15th.

Their home visit isn't so much a visit. He looked us up on satellite and now he wants pictures of the inside and the yard and us.

I explained why we haven't gotten the yard fenced yet but let him know that I have contacted an installation company.

I'M SO EXCITED!!!!!

Ginger This is Ginger. She's the one he's putting on hold for us, and my boyfriend's favorite. He went all gooey when he saw her.

Holly If you go here, you can see Holly - along with Ginger and all the other sweet dogs the have for adoption. Holly is my favorite. When I saw her picture, I actually squeed. I do NOT squee.
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  #30  
Old 01-05-2010, 05:55 PM
Katriona Katriona is offline
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Originally Posted by congodwarf View Post
Yaaaay!!!!!!!


I finally got the call from Good Dogs!!! Our caseworker was happy with our application and he's putting my boyfriend's favorite on hold for us. He is sending me an email with contact info for the foster mom so I can call her and get personal information about the puppy. He said she has the sister dog that I want too. I talked to my boyfriend and he said absolutely get them both!!!!!
Congrats!
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  #31  
Old 01-11-2010, 03:39 PM
Athena Athena is offline
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Sooooo..... fluiddruid, didja get the pug? Where's the pics! We need pug puppy pics!
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  #32  
Old 01-11-2010, 04:22 PM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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No, I didn't. I did get approved but it turned out they had misrepresented the dog just a little bit ("needs a little training" is a pretty huge difference from "not housebroken, you'll need to buy a belly band", in my view).

Feeling pretty frustrated since I also applied for adoption for another dog, then was told "Oh, we're not really sure of his breed, we put down pug but we think he's a mix, also he had major medical problems we didn't disclose".

Why do shelters jerk me around so much? I mean, if the dog has a major issue, why put me through so many hoops before telling me? In both cases, I directly asked pertinent questions that covered these areas, and was given really different answers when it actually came down to planning the adoption's final mechanics. I was told at first that the pug was being given up for economic reasons; it was only when I was actually finalizing everything that they admitted "welllllll, and because they couldn't potty train him and he whizzes on the rug constantly".

Frankly, I'm a bit peevy about the whole thing. I'm going to stop looking at shelters outside my area - just not worth my time.
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  #33  
Old 01-11-2010, 06:11 PM
freckafree freckafree is offline
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fluiddruid, that just sucks -- for you and the poor dog! They're not doing him any favors by misrepresenting him to prospective owners.

Wishing you luck in finding the doggy companion you're looking for.
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  #34  
Old 01-11-2010, 07:41 PM
pbbth pbbth is offline
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Originally Posted by fluiddruid View Post
No, I didn't. I did get approved but it turned out they had misrepresented the dog just a little bit ("needs a little training" is a pretty huge difference from "not housebroken, you'll need to buy a belly band", in my view).

Feeling pretty frustrated since I also applied for adoption for another dog, then was told "Oh, we're not really sure of his breed, we put down pug but we think he's a mix, also he had major medical problems we didn't disclose".

Why do shelters jerk me around so much? I mean, if the dog has a major issue, why put me through so many hoops before telling me? In both cases, I directly asked pertinent questions that covered these areas, and was given really different answers when it actually came down to planning the adoption's final mechanics. I was told at first that the pug was being given up for economic reasons; it was only when I was actually finalizing everything that they admitted "welllllll, and because they couldn't potty train him and he whizzes on the rug constantly".

Frankly, I'm a bit peevy about the whole thing. I'm going to stop looking at shelters outside my area - just not worth my time.
I know how you feel. When we were looking for a dog we saw several that we were told were all sweetness and light only to be told right before signing the paperwork that they actually bite the crap out of everyone or haven't been housebroken or have some horrible disease that they will pass on to our cats. We stopped looking and decided that when we do finally get a dog (which won't be for a while as I have discovered I'm allergic and I need to see a doctor before adopting one) we will buy a dog from a reputable breeder as a puppy to avoid all the lies the adoption people tell you when trying to find homes for their dogs.
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  #35  
Old 01-11-2010, 09:00 PM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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Yeah. I guess it's kind of a stupid fantasy - I was hoping to find a nice dog (but off a relatively short list of breeds) that someone couldn't care for because of personal reasons or whatever. I mean, I expected some retraining, but I honestly don't have the ability to take on someone else's problem.

Maybe that's naive. I had such a good experience with my cat after getting him from a shelter, but he's just a random cat, not any particular sought-after breed.
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  #36  
Old 01-12-2010, 09:46 AM
Athena Athena is offline
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Have you checked any pug rescues? I know there's one in Michigan (www.michiganpugrescue.com), there might be one closer to you.

I wish I could adopt them all...
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  #37  
Old 01-12-2010, 11:18 AM
Minnie Luna Minnie Luna is offline
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It stinks when a rescue does not disclose all the issues an animal has upfront. We try and be as open as possible with all our animals, we think it helps them find the best match possible. We had an FIV pos cat that was with us for 18 months before she found a home. We had a cat with IBS, three legged ones, blind cats, a couple of dogs with allergies, lots of special needs animals, and with each we represented them as they were. It does no one any good to not let potential adopters know what they will be faced with. It is just another reason why people eschew rescue in favor of breeders.

Good luck and I hope a pug finds you soon.
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  #38  
Old 01-12-2010, 11:29 AM
Munch Munch is offline
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That's terrible. Sorry to hear, fluiddruid.

Another recommendation: Contact all the doggie daycares in your area, asking if any of them sponsor adoptions. My second rescue dog, Toby, came from my daycare. I knew going in that he was socialized, got along great with my dog, and didn't have any medical issues. As a bonus, he gets to go to daycare for free when he brings a friend.
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  #39  
Old 01-12-2010, 11:46 AM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Athena View Post
Have you checked any pug rescues? I know there's one in Michigan (www.michiganpugrescue.com), there might be one closer to you.

I wish I could adopt them all...
I haven't had good experiences with breed rescues, either. I approached one last year and got the complete runaround (they would not answer basic questions without filling out a lengthy application -- which took me about an hour -- and they then "lost"). Most don't deal with out of staters (and the breed rescues for breeds I would be interested in are all out of state), have stringent requirements, require lengthy application processes, and also charge substantially more to adopt than it would be to get a new puppy. They also make you sign a contract for the dog - like if anything happens to you, you can't give the dog to a family member, they legally retake possession of the dog.

Last edited by fluiddruid; 01-12-2010 at 11:47 AM..
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  #40  
Old 01-13-2010, 07:32 AM
Munch Munch is offline
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fluiddruid - I just dropped my dogs off at daycare, and they have two beagles for adoption. They were dumped at an employee's house (everyone that works there seems to have a reputation of being their neighborhood's rescue person), and have been neutered. Both are in great spirits, and seem like fantastic dogs.

Todd
Buck

Indy's a hike, but I can vouch for the organization.
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  #41  
Old 05-21-2013, 01:48 AM
Sandyjeanie Sandyjeanie is offline
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home visits for pet adoption

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyper View Post
When I was a kid, the Greyhound Pets of America sent a couple of people and a couple of greyhounds over for a home visit when my family expressed interest in adopting a greyhound. There wasn't any serious home inspection-- they just sat and chatted with my parents about the special needs of greyhounds, the do's and don't's, and all that. I also got the feeling they wanted to make sure my sister and I were mellow kids who knew how to treat dogs and wouldn't freak out the poor greyhounds, who tend to be shy and gentle types.
I too adopted a greyhound from Greyhound Pets of America many years ago, and they did a home visit. We didn't have a fenced in yard, & I had 3 young children, and many stairs. I also had 3 huge picture windows which they told me to watch out for. Two days later I found out why. My greyhound saw her reflection, charged the window & nearly knocked herself out in the process. Other than that, it worked out beautifully. We never fenced our yard, but we let her run in a gated park everyday. She learned to climb our many stairs, no problem. She was smart enough to never charge the picture window again. And, she loved my young children & they loved her. The woman who brought us the greyhound told us that the life expectancy of a racing greyhound was about 9 yrs old. Our greyhound lived to age 15 years old. The whole point is, we had no problem with the home visit for adoption, & enjoyed many wonderful yrs with our adopted greyhound. On the other hand, listen to this strange story. My cousin, who always had a dog, & took great care of them, applied to adopt a dog online. They too, required a home visit. My cousin had a huge, gorgeous, brand new home at the end of a cul-de-sac, and her large yard was all fenced in. She lived in a lovely country setting with 2 neighbors nearby, a doctor, & a lawyer. The woman who did the home visit, refused my cousin a dog because she said that the road leading to my cousin's street (3 miles away), had one house with peeling paint, & they couldn't place a dog near a neighborhood like that. Crazy, isn't it? A week later, my cousin adopted a black lab from the city pound. The pound told her that the dog was sweet & loved to chase sticks. So, after getting to know the dog for a few days, my cousin started throwing sticks for the lab to bring back. On the 3rd throw, the dog attacked my cousin & nearly killed her. She was in the hospital, & the police took the dog away. When she was better, she bought an $800 poodle puppy & they have lived happily ever after.
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Old 05-21-2013, 02:32 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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I don't suppose fluiddruid is still looking for those same answers now, 3+ years later. In case this is still of interest to anyone, here is an adoption application from one local rescue group, The Humane Society of Stanislaus County (Ca). It asks a lot of the types of questions that might also be covered on an inspection.

Application to Adopt a Pet (Note that the question are almost all dog-specific.)
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:05 AM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Originally Posted by Sandyjeanie View Post
A week later, my cousin adopted a black lab from the city pound. The pound told her that the dog was sweet & loved to chase sticks. So, after getting to know the dog for a few days, my cousin started throwing sticks for the lab to bring back. On the 3rd throw, the dog attacked my cousin & nearly killed her. She was in the hospital, & the police took the dog away. When she was better, she bought an $800 poodle puppy & they have lived happily ever after.
Wow, what a fluke! Adopting a dog seldom results in this kind of experience; it's typically more reliable than buying from a breeder. Rescues and shelters have no financial incentive to "move product" and a near-limitless supply of dogs from which to select the best.

And to match your anecdote, my sister has a poodle she bought from a breeder; the little miniature poodle is now registered with Animal Control as a dangerous dog.

We have adopted multiple dogs from the pound and never had a problem with any of them. Our current two:

Sadie, a pit bull mix who was abused and shot (still has three shotgun pellets in her) and loves everyone she meets -- we call her "the mayor" because she has to greet everyone in the neighborhood.

Simone, an American Pit Bull Terrier who was found starving on the street. She loves to be a lapdog, and she is nurturing by nature, looking after other dogs and encouraging them when she walks for charity (like the Police 5k K-9 Krawl, where she recently saved the police chief's dog from running into the highway, and the Poplar Spring Run for the Animals, where she came in first and attracted many admirers).

To sum up: "reputable" breeder's miniature poodle = registered dangerous dog; starving and abused pit bulls from the pound = friendly and popular participants in their community.
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  #44  
Old 05-21-2013, 08:43 AM
clairobscur clairobscur is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigmagirl View Post
Be prepared to show a proper spot, in a nice place like the kitchen or bedroom, not in the garage or basement. !

Isn't it over the top to require that a dog won't sleep in a garage?
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  #45  
Old 05-21-2013, 08:47 AM
clairobscur clairobscur is offline
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Originally Posted by Sailboat View Post
Can you go to the website of the rescue that will be doing the home inspection and look to see if they have a list of requirements (fenced yard, no children or maximum number of children, other pets, etc.)? .
Maximum number of children????? Or even *no* children????
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  #46  
Old 05-21-2013, 08:57 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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I know this is old, but I would have gone to a different shelter. I mean really, a home visit? I adopted a human and the home visit wasn't that big of a deal. I guess I can understand this a little for a first time dog adopter, but other than matching people with the right type of dog for the size of their home I think this kind of thing is overkill. And it can hit the extremes, a shelter near here was taken over because the operators didn't think anyone was good enough to adopt their charges and the place was piling up with unplaced animals. The end result was all newly found homeless animals had to go to kill shelters, which would have been Blackjack's fate if I didn't let him come live with me.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:18 AM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clairobscur View Post
Isn't it over the top to require that a dog won't sleep in a garage?
No, there is nothing wrong with having your dog sleep in the garage, as long as it's not too hot or cold, there is plenty of ventilation, and all chemicals and other dangerous things are stored safely away.
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  #48  
Old 05-21-2013, 09:41 AM
sandra_nz sandra_nz is online now
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
I know this is old, but I would have gone to a different shelter. I mean really, a home visit?
Heh, I had a home visit when I wanted to adopt a cat from the RSPCA. Seemed a bit over the top to me (two people came and did the visit, TWO PEOPLE) but it only took about 15 minutes.
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  #49  
Old 05-21-2013, 09:45 AM
LaurenIpsum LaurenIpsum is offline
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I can comment a bit on this as I recently had a home visit. I have a chihuahua (which I bought from a pet store, bad bad I know) and have been looking for a second one. This time I decided, now that I know better, I would adopt from a shelter or rescue.

A few months ago found an animal rescue that had a chihuahua that we liked, and they arranged for us to meet the foster mom with the dog at a local PetSmart to see how the two got along. This particular rescue required me to fill out an application, and have it approved, prior to meeting, but no home visit was required. They said if we liked the dog we could take her right away. Unfortunately the meeting didn't work out as the dog didn't seem a good match for ours regarding temperament and energy level.

Then I recently found anther chihuahua from a local rescue. They also required an application prior to meeting. In speaking with the foster mom, she offered to bring the dog to our house for the meeting, since a home visit was required anyway. When she came, we kept the dogs in the kitchen to see how they'd interact. My husband asked her if she wanted to see the rest of the house, but she said it wasn't necessary as she could see that we had a "good home." So I gathered that in this case, the home visit was just a way to make sure that we weren't hoarders with a hundred cats and no room to move, or something like that.

I have heard stories about some shelters/rescues not adopting to people who don't have a fenced in yard. We do not have one, and when I mentioned it to the foster mom she didn't seem bothered by it. So I think there is a lot of variation in what the requirements are to adopt.

And I'm happy to report that the meeting between the two dogs did go well, and our new addition will be joining us on Friday.

Edited to add: Arrgh, zombie! And I usually check the dates too. Hopefully someone else finds the info useful.

Last edited by LaurenIpsum; 05-21-2013 at 09:48 AM..
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  #50  
Old 05-21-2013, 10:29 AM
StGermain StGermain is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandra_nz View Post
Heh, I had a home visit when I wanted to adopt a cat from the RSPCA. Seemed a bit over the top to me (two people came and did the visit, TWO PEOPLE) but it only took about 15 minutes.
It's safer for the inspectors to go in pairs. Less likely to be abducted, murdered, etc. I don't think it's any reflection on you or adopters in general.

StG
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