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  #1  
Old 01-08-2010, 10:07 AM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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How many spiders do you figure the average North American house has in it?

We changed houses this summer, and it seems like we have had far too many spiders showing up in this new house (I've killed four or five in five months, and my husband has shooed some more out the door). I was just wondering how many spiders are actually in my house that I *don't* see at any time. What do you think - 20? 30? 50?
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  #2  
Old 01-08-2010, 10:12 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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At least a thousand. Probably many more.
BTW - had you noticed that one in your hair?
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:17 AM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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You think you're being funny, but the spiders in our new house are danglers - I keep finding them on the ceiling or dangling, just about to land on me. Gah.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:21 AM
RunSilent RunSilent is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
We changed houses this summer, and it seems like we have had far too many spiders showing up in this new house (I've killed four or five in five months, and my husband has shooed some more out the door). I was just wondering how many spiders are actually in my house that I *don't* see at any time. What do you think - 20? 30? 50?
Why do you kill them? They are quite helpful, you know.
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  #5  
Old 01-08-2010, 11:28 AM
otternell otternell is offline
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They can go and be helpful outside! That's my personal belief: you come inside and your life expectancy just dropped Mr. Spider. You stay in the shed, garage or just outside, and you can go your merry way. And we have had some huge spiders outside. Well, huge for Iowa, it was just a little smaller than a tarantula. We took pictures and the bug control place identified it (can't remember now) and said its bite caused necrosis and it was not natural to IA. I wish we would have killed it, as we have no idea where it went or what happened to it. I hope it didn't make thousands of baby spiders. ::shudder::
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:30 AM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Exactly - inside, fair game. Outside, go live your spidery life with my blessing.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:31 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
You think you're being funny, but the spiders in our new house are danglers - I keep finding them on the ceiling or dangling, just about to land on me. Gah.
I really resent your discrimination against the myriad "climbers" living in your house - including, undoutbedly, your bedding!

Just want to do my little part to make you feel more comfortable within your skin.

A little more seriously, you are only seeing the obvious ones, which I understand comprise a tiny minority of the spiders infesting your (and everyone else's) house. Just imagine how many are scurrying around inside the walls, up in the attic and down in the basement, way back in the closets ...
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:32 AM
MeanOldLady MeanOldLady is offline
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Why did I click this thread?
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Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
At least a thousand. Probably many more.
BTW - had you noticed that one in your hair?
And why are you a bad person?
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:45 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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You may imagine how disappointed I am to find that I may have been passing misinformation.

So I take back what I said about the total number of spiders in your house. I'm sure there are no more than a handful, and you will soon get rid of them all. (But I meant what I said about that one in your hair. It looks mean - and hungry!)

Be honest now, don't you feel where it itches?

Last edited by Dinsdale; 01-08-2010 at 11:45 AM..
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  #10  
Old 01-08-2010, 11:47 AM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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The only reason spiders live anywhere is that's where their food is. Get rid of the spider chow in your house: problem solved. Of course, that is way too much effort--so you have to be happy (?) cursing and smashing our little eight-legged friends.
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Entwistle
Look he's crawling up my wall,
Black and hairy, very small....
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  #11  
Old 01-08-2010, 11:59 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Why do you kill them? They are quite helpful, you know.
If by "helpful" you mean they will do the dishes and laundry, then hell ya, bring em on. Otherwise. . .squish.
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Old 01-08-2010, 01:09 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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If by "helpful" you mean they will do the dishes and laundry, then hell ya, bring em on. Otherwise. . .squish.
A spider large enough to be that helpful would not be welcome in my house, thank you. Even wearing a little French Maid type outfit.
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  #13  
Old 01-10-2010, 06:03 AM
arachnologus arachnologus is offline
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Here's the spider specialist's answer. (Sorry I didn't spot this thread sooner). Counting the crawlspace and wall voids, several hundred spiders at least in a typical house. They would belong to anywhere from 5 to 25 different species, depending on how rich a spider habitat your house is (i.e. how many insects and how much moisture is available). Not many would have any tendency to dangle. And practically all would be harmless to humans, unless you live in the quite-small area where the "brown recluse" is common. Even there, genuine spider bites are quite rare (alleged "bites" where nobody saw any spider don't count).

I once did a comparative census of Tegenaria (European house spiders) in Seattle houses, enumerating the first 50 I found in each house. I never had any trouble finding 50 just of this particular genus, and this was without tearing apart any walls or moving the washing machine.

I'm afraid Otternell is living in a fool's paradise with the idea "you come inside and your life expectancy just dropped Mr. Spider." House spiders don't come inside: that's one of the myths debunked on my web site. They are different species from the spiders in your yard and garden.

If you actually could make all your house spiders disappear, your woolens and carpets would soon be eaten up by moths and beetles, you could never keep any whole foods in your pantry for the stored product pests, all your books would fall apart from the depredations of the silverfish and firebrats, drugstore beetles would eat your spices, you'd have big flea outbreaks every time one hitched in from the yard dropped by a wandering raccoon or cat, every mosquito that wandered in would be sure to find you... Would it be worth it?
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Old 01-10-2010, 02:11 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Well, if you put it that way...
Okay, the ones I don't see get to live, and I won't go looking for them. And perhaps I was exaggerating about all the dangling - mostly they are up on the ceiling. The one that was dangling was right near my face - that left quite an impression on me.
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  #15  
Old 01-10-2010, 02:13 PM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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In my experience, there are some questions it it better not to know the answer to. In that category are whether your parents truly loved you or only the idea of you; whatever happened to that girl you kissed on the last day of 8th grade and were passionately in love with but never saw again; and the exact number of spiders in your house.
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  #16  
Old 01-10-2010, 02:13 PM
Is_it_safe? Is_it_safe? is offline
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Not sure in total but I manage to remove one-two hobo spiders a month from the place. My wife has been bitten once by one.
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  #17  
Old 01-10-2010, 02:55 PM
MoodIndigo1 MoodIndigo1 is offline
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Originally Posted by arachnologus View Post
I'm afraid Otternell is living in a fool's paradise with the idea "you come inside and your life expectancy just dropped Mr. Spider." House spiders don't come inside: that's one of the myths debunked on my web site. They are different species from the spiders in your yard and garden.

If you actually could make all your house spiders disappear, your woolens and carpets would soon be eaten up by moths and beetles, you could never keep any whole foods in your pantry for the stored product pests, all your books would fall apart from the depredations of the silverfish and firebrats, drugstore beetles would eat your spices, you'd have big flea outbreaks every time one hitched in from the yard dropped by a wandering raccoon or cat, every mosquito that wandered in would be sure to find you... Would it be worth it?
Thank you for the info, arachnologus. Ignorance on my part fought.

My grandmother told me when I was 8 that spiders were useful and should not be killed. I like spiders, but when one gets to be too bothersome (e.g. a large spider dangling in the middle of my kitchen when I'm expecting arachnophobic guests), I tend to pick it up and put it outside. I thought I was giving it a chance. From now on, I'll stick it in the attached garage or our cold-room/larder.

No fear or squeamishness regarding spiders, but if a wasp makes its way into the house, I become a blubbering idiot.
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  #18  
Old 01-10-2010, 03:34 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Think about it this way: you have spiders in your house because your house has lots of spider food. Now me, I'd WAY rather see the spiders than be overrun with what the spiders eat. I rarely see them, but I like 'em. They're doing a good and useful service.
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  #19  
Old 01-10-2010, 03:36 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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I've never thought that spiders come into the house in the Autumn, but I've seen spiders come into the house in the Summer.

I've never knowingly seen a hobo spider, but I've seen a few that are about the right size and shape. There's no way for me to know what kind they are. Mostly I see 'daddy long legs' (Pholcus phalangioides) and what I call 'garden spiders' (since they look the same as the ones in the lawn). Sometimes I'll find a 'Giant house spider' (Tegenaria duellica). These are brownish, and about 30 mm to 50 mm long in their resting position. If I flip over the couch, I'm sure to find at least one false black widow (Steatoda). No doubt I'm reclining over a couple right now. I've never seen an orb weaver or jumping spider in the house.

This house is approaching 76 years old and is in a wooded area. Many parts of it, under the house/floors, walls, etc. have been undisturbed for years and years. Good spider habitat. Total floor space is about 1,090 I think. So if there's one spider per square foot, that's almost 1,100 spiders in the house. I've never seen that density of spiders here; but then there are also the walls and under-furniture spaces to consider, which might in plan-form result in that density. I'm guessing this house has at least several hundred spiders in or under it.

False black widows I don't care about. Out of sight, out of mind. The others are captured an placed in the Penalty Jar until I take them outside. The way I reckon is this: Spiders lived outside before there were houses. So if I release them outside, they have a chance to find a suitable substitute. Better that than smashing. And if they get eaten outside? Well, then a bird or another spider gets fed.
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Old 01-10-2010, 03:46 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Depends on what you mean by in the house. If you mean the actual living space, probably a dozen or so total. They like to hang out in the bathrooms, mostly. However, down in the cellar there are probably 50-100 of them. Generally they're not the biting kind (wolf spiders and one other kind that's tiny with a fierce bite come in during the summer) so who cares?
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  #21  
Old 01-10-2010, 04:59 PM
Silver Tyger Silver Tyger is offline
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When I first moved into my last apartment, we had to deal with a lot of spiders. Actually by we, I mean I, because I was the least arachnophobic (my sister will freak about a little tiny one smaller than a pencil eraser.) I'm of a live and let live philosophy - if it's far enough way that it's not bothering me, it may live. If not, I'm finding the vacuum. That distance depends a great deal on it's size.

I'm sure a large part of why we had so many (and many of them were big) was that when the apartments were between tenants the windows and door were left open. My theory is that when there aren't human occupants to disturb things the bugs (and by bugs I mean anything smaller than me with too many legs) spread out. Naturally once you move back in they have to disappear or get killed / disturbed / kill it with fire!
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  #22  
Old 01-10-2010, 05:42 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arachnologus View Post
Here's the spider specialist's answer. (Sorry I didn't spot this thread sooner). Counting the crawlspace and wall voids, several hundred spiders at least in a typical house. They would belong to anywhere from 5 to 25 different species, depending on how rich a spider habitat your house is (i.e. how many insects and how much moisture is available).
I "read somewhere" that you're seldom more than about six feet from a spider. Seems plausible to me. How say you?



Quote:
Originally Posted by arachnologus View Post
I once did a comparative census of Tegenaria (European house spiders) in Seattle houses, enumerating the first 50 I found in each house. I never had any trouble finding 50 just of this particular genus, and this was without tearing apart any walls or moving the washing machine.
Is this the spider that's so big it'll flip you off while it carries away your dog?

Seriously- how common have they gotten to be in Seattle?

Thanks.
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  #23  
Old 01-10-2010, 05:57 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
And if they get eaten outside? Well, then a bird or another spider gets fed.
I once "escorted" a house spider out to the front porch; the moment it touched the ground, another spider came out from a crevice, pounced on it and carried it away.

I felt horrible.
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  #24  
Old 01-10-2010, 06:03 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
I "read somewhere" that you're seldom more than about six feet from a spider. Seems plausible to me. How say you?
From the Spider Myths page:
Quote:
How close the nearest spider may be does, in fact, depend on where you are. If you're standing on a lush green lawn, you can expect small spiders directly under your shoes, and others within 3 centimeters on all sides. If you're in the middle of a parking lot, the nearest spider could be 30, 50 or even 100 meters away. If you're an airplane passenger, the only nearby spiders might be airborne ballooners, and spiders don't balloon at night, so on a night flight you could be several kilometers from the nearest one.

Most human situations will be somewhere between these extremes. So, is three feet (or 7-8 feet, or "a few yards") your average distance from a spider? Nobody knows, because nobody's done the intricate calculations to find the average distance between a human and a spider. Besides, the mythical statements in these books and articles don't even call it an average. They're just a case of how one man's unguarded statement becomes apocryphal "common knowledge."
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
Seriously- how common have they gotten to be in Seattle?
I normally find two a year in my house 110 miles north of Seattle.
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  #25  
Old 01-10-2010, 06:04 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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Originally Posted by blondebear View Post
I once "escorted" a house spider out to the front porch; the moment it touched the ground, another spider came out from a crevice, pounced on it and carried it away.

I felt horrible.
As my dad used to say: Them's the breaks of Naval warfare.
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  #26  
Old 01-10-2010, 06:05 PM
Little Cat Z Little Cat Z is offline
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I am not reading this thread. I'm sorry I even saw the title. I don't want to know. I don't. La la la la....
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  #27  
Old 01-10-2010, 08:58 PM
arachnologus arachnologus is offline
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Originally Posted by Is_it_safe? View Post
Not sure in total but I manage to remove one-two hobo spiders a month from the place. My wife has been bitten once by one.
Whether you might actually be seeing hobo spiders depends on where you are (I found no locality info in your profile.) See the distribution map here (click small map to enlarge). Also, as explained on that page, hobo spiders look exactly like maybe 200 harmless relatives to the naked eye. In the city of Seattle, they are almost vanishingly rare compared to their successful competitor the (harmless) giant house spider. As for your wife's bite -- did anyone see that spider? If not, it was probably a misdiagnosis and not a real spider bite.

Quote:
Originally posted by TreacherousCretin
I "read somewhere" that you're seldom more than about six feet from a spider. Seems plausible to me. How say you?
As already pointed out by Johnny L.A., this one is also debunked on my site, in its original "three feet" form.

Quote:
Originally posted by TreacherousCretin
Is this [Tegenaria] the spider that's so big it'll flip you off while it carries away your dog? Seriously- how common have they gotten to be in Seattle?
Seattle boasts 3 species of Tegenaria (European house spiders) which, like the Three Bears, are small, middle-sized and large. The large one ("giant house spider") is the most conspicuous because of its size. The ones people actually see are the mature males that wander in search of mates in late summer. They may be totally absent from a few houses but most probably have 25-100 of them in secluded spots. The detailed architecture of the building will determine how many of these end up running across the living room; in some cases the males have little opportunity to reach the human-occupied spaces (probably to the mutual satisfaction of the spiders and humans ). These spiders don't know you exist; if you're scared of them that's your problem. In reality they are so docile that I use them as hands-on demonstrators for school children.
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  #28  
Old 01-10-2010, 09:48 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
In my experience, there are some questions it it better not to know the answer to. In that category are whether your parents truly loved you or only the idea of you; whatever happened to that girl you kissed on the last day of 8th grade and were passionately in love with but never saw again; and the exact number of spiders in your house.
I'm starting to get that. Small, medium, and large European house spiders? Large? I don't think I want to know.
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  #29  
Old 01-10-2010, 10:01 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
Large? I don't think I want to know.
Here's one I caught a year or two ago. Sorry for the poor quality. There's a smaller spider in there too, and there's a disposable lighter for scale.
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Old 01-10-2010, 10:03 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Gah. I understand spiders are necessary and do good things, but why do they have to be so goddamned creepy?
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  #31  
Old 01-10-2010, 10:47 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
Here's one I caught a year or two ago. Sorry for the poor quality. There's a smaller spider in there too, and there's a disposable lighter for scale.
arachnologus, we have these in the northeast too, right? Because they look like the hoards in the basement. They don't bite people, do they? Besides the upsetting habit of drowning themselves even after an attempt to redirect them away from the path of the showerhead, I have no problem with them.
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Old 01-10-2010, 11:16 PM
gonzomax gonzomax is offline
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I read a study in a Missouri town found 80 % of the houses had Brown Recluses.
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Old 01-10-2010, 11:34 PM
arachnologus arachnologus is offline
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arachnologus, we have these in the northeast too, right? Because they look like the hoards in the basement. They don't bite people, do they?
Nope, giant house spiders (native to England) have been found in the USA only in the Pacific NW. But there are numerous other species that look similar to the naked eye. Real spider ID requires a microscope. In any case, no spiders (even the small minority of more toxic ones) go out of their way to bite people. For a bite to occur, the spider has to (1) be standing on the person's skin, and (2) become trapped there. The idea that spiders crawl into people's beds and bite them is strictly an urban legend.

Quote:
Originally posted by gonzomax
I read a study in a Missouri town found 80 % of the houses had Brown Recluses.
Could even be higher than 80%. Missouri is the center of that species' distribution. But (as per another study), even in a house with a brown recluse population of over 2000, actual human bites never happened!
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  #34  
Old 01-10-2010, 11:44 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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Originally Posted by arachnologus View Post
The idea that spiders crawl into people's beds and bite them is strictly an urban legend.
I had a 'spot' on both inner calves at about the same position on each one. They were about 10 mm in diameter, and persisted for about a year. You can barely see them now, but they are surrounded by a ring of pale (practically white) skin. I'd assumed that a spider or an insect had become trapped between my calves and bit me. I never had it checked out; and as I said, they've pretty much disappeared. So I'm not going to worry about them.
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  #35  
Old 01-11-2010, 12:47 AM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by arachnologus View Post
As already pointed out by Johnny L.A., this one is also debunked on my site, in its original "three feet" form.
I should have mentioned that I didn't wonder if it was literally true (24/7 no matter where you are), but in a vague, "generally speaking" sense. But it's still silly, I now admit.


.
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  #36  
Old 01-13-2010, 03:24 PM
Silver Tyger Silver Tyger is offline
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I'm not finding this thread reassuring, but thank you arachnologus for the interesting information. Just keep them away from me. =^.^=
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  #37  
Old 01-13-2010, 03:27 PM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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I'm not finding this thread reassuring, but thank you arachnologus for the interesting information. Just keep them away from me. =^.^=
I have directed the spiders under my command to leave you be so long as it is reasonably practical.

Unfortuantely that still leaves eleventy quadrillion gunning for you. And some of them are Vulcans.

Sorry.
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  #38  
Old 01-13-2010, 03:32 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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Arachnologus, You might enjoy this thread where the "spider question" is being hashed out in the context of evolutionary psychology - particularly, why do many people have spider phobias? (My position is that spiders would never have been a major threat to people and so an evolutionary explaination is unlikely):

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...3#post11989223

Last edited by Malthus; 01-13-2010 at 03:32 PM..
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  #39  
Old 01-14-2010, 12:31 AM
arachnologus arachnologus is offline
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Originally Posted by Silver Tyger Girl View Post
Just keep them away from me. =^.^=
What sort of compensation are you offering for a full-time spider-keeper-awayer?

Incidentally, I've added a post to the evolutionary psych thread Malthus referenced above.
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  #40  
Old 01-14-2010, 09:43 AM
GoodOmens GoodOmens is offline
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I have a significant fear of the little creepers but I'm starting to get more used to them now that I own a house. As long as they don't make themselves a nuisance, they can hang around; live and let live, you know? Even if they do bug/scare me, I almost never squish one (that's bad luck). Instead they usually get a free ride outside on the Index Card Express.
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Old 01-14-2010, 02:58 PM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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Originally Posted by arachnologus View Post
...
Seattle boasts 3 species of Tegenaria (European house spiders) ...These spiders don't know you exist; if you're scared of them that's your problem.
Ah, I'm in Seattle and always wondered what these really were. They get damn big here. The last one that I relocated (after serenely and calmly discovering it on the cover of my novel that I picked up to relax with, only a few serene and peaceful millimeters from my fingers) was so large and feisty that I could feel and hear the thumping in the tupperware container I caught it in, and after releasing it in the yard I could see its path as it ran away displacing the blades of grass in my lawn.
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  #42  
Old 01-14-2010, 03:25 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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In Northern Ontario/Quebec, we get so-called "Dock Spiders" big enough that I'd consider charging 'em rent at the cottage ...

Also, they are fast and active.
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  #43  
Old 01-14-2010, 03:47 PM
smithsb smithsb is offline
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I vote we add "Straight Dope Spider Advisory Board" to arachnologus member category.
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  #44  
Old 01-14-2010, 05:28 PM
3:20:59 or bust 3:20:59 or bust is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
From the Spider Myths page:



I normally find two a year in my house 110 miles north of Seattle.
You've got to be at the border, or over it!

I lived in Birch Bay for a couple years - don't remember the spiders being worse than anywhere else. Canadians, on the other hand, infested the area horribly in the summer.
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Old 01-14-2010, 05:30 PM
Audrey Levins Audrey Levins is offline
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This thread is rather fascinating. But it's making me itch.

I'm not hugely arachnophobic--I'm far more paranoid and insane about wasps/hornets and roaches--because spiders generally hang out in corners, in cobwebs, in dusty spaces behind books, etc...you usually have to go looking for one to find one. I've occasionally seen little tiny, tiny pale-colored spiders (so small that when they crawl across the book I'm reading, the text is three times their size) and I find myself charmed. I dunno if they are just baby spiders, or if they are a member of some Tiny Tiny Spider Club, but either way I go out of my way not to harm them. Cuz, you know, they're cute.

But like any bug, if it's big, it's creepy and horrible and must be killed. Like snakes, there are many harmless ones and a few potentially deadly ones, and I'm neither skilled nor logical enough to tell the difference. So DIE, DIE, DIE!
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  #46  
Old 01-14-2010, 05:39 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2003
under contract you should have at least 4
- one in the bath tub
- one in a random shoe
- one under the kitchen sink
- one in the ceiling corner above your bed

If you opted for more then check your lease/mortgage agreement. That's what all that mouse-type is in a contract.

Last edited by Magiver; 01-14-2010 at 05:39 PM..
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  #47  
Old 01-14-2010, 07:52 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Meridian/280
Posts: 10,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audrey Levins View Post
...Tiny Tiny Spider Club...
Band name!

Last edited by blondebear; 01-14-2010 at 07:53 PM..
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  #48  
Old 01-14-2010, 08:47 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Lethbridge, AB.
Posts: 48,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by smithsb View Post
I vote we add "Straight Dope Spider Advisory Board" to arachnologus member category.
Seconded!
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  #49  
Old 01-14-2010, 09:02 PM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 15,507
I love spiders, and at one time had several tarantulas as pets =)

I make sure never to kill my house spiders, and I know that I have at least 10 daddy longlegs running around in the house, at least 10 wolf spiders, and at least 3 or 4 web spinners types in the attic, and innumerable ones in the crawlspace under the house. Unfortunately the chickens tend to eat any they find outside on the lawn =(
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  #50  
Old 01-14-2010, 11:07 PM
Taomist Taomist is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2009
!!!!!LALALALALA I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!!!

The best part about moving from Virginia to Southern California is that I have yet to see a spider in the house. Ants, yep. Spiders? Nope. Not even outside.
In Virginia, they were not only everywhere, but they were fricking HUGE. One spun a web the size of a shed door, and was itself easily as big as my two fists put together. <shudders> Was a very pretty yellow thing, oblong-ish, and a beautiful web...but if it hadn't been on the FAR end of the yard I would have found a flamethrower and burnt down the yard, I think.

GAH I HATE SPIDERS!!!
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