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  #1  
Old 01-09-2010, 07:37 AM
Neverender Neverender is offline
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Weight difference between fresh and frozen foods?

Does anybody know how much different foods would weigh once frozen?

For example, how much would 100g worth of chicken (fresh) weigh once frozen?

Thanks in advance for any answers, it'll help when buying frozen stuff when recipes call for the weight in fresh.

Last edited by Neverender; 01-09-2010 at 07:37 AM..
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  #2  
Old 01-09-2010, 10:36 AM
friedo friedo is offline
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What makes you think the weight would be different? Where does matter go or come from when you reduce the temperature?

(And no, I don't think the quantum effects of temperature reduction would be easily measurable on a food scale.)
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:19 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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The only question is how much extra water from processing the product gains during the freezing process or how much water might evaporate from the product if it is fresh.

There could have been a slight water gain in the older freezing processes, which weren't as cold and so took longer. Today's flash freezing should pretty much eliminate that.

I doubt that most products would lose much water by the time they get to you, although it's a possibility for a few fruits.

Hard to imagine chicken being affected either way. I'd think that any weight differences would be negligible, even if you let it freeze in a home refrigerator and then thawed it out. It's too impermeable.
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:53 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
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However, some foods end up with a lot of frozen water mixed in. Open a box of frozen spinach and it seems like it's 75% spinach and 25% ice by volume, and probably even a higher water percentage by weight.

I don't know whether the package advertised weight is before or after all that ice is added. I know what the answer would be unless there are regs to prevent it.

But if the OP wanted the equivalent of 100g of fresh spinach, (s)he would be wrong to weigh out 100g of spinach and ice mixture.


Most meat now is flash-frozen, so external ice isn't as much of an issue. Although before freezing the meat had gosh knows how much brine & "flavorings" injected.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 01-09-2010 at 12:54 PM..
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Old 01-09-2010, 07:27 PM
Neverender Neverender is offline
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I was under the impression that there was some extra liquid involved due to the amount of liquid left on a plate when you defrost meat. Then again, it's not a great amount really is it?

Do you think this amount really matters then?
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Old 01-09-2010, 07:47 PM
groman groman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neverender View Post
I was under the impression that there was some extra liquid involved due to the amount of liquid left on a plate when you defrost meat. Then again, it's not a great amount really is it?
Well some freezing processes might involve extra liquid, but I always thought that the liquid you get from defrosting things is just the product losing moisture due to broken cell walls. As in, you get the same amount of stuff but some of the water that was inside the fresh food has now leaked out.
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Old 01-09-2010, 10:09 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Originally Posted by LSLGuy View Post
Most meat now is flash-frozen, so external ice isn't as much of an issue. Although before freezing the meat had gosh knows how much brine & "flavorings" injected.
I know a lot of chicken breasts are brined, or otherwise have water added, before freezing. It should say on the box how much is added, approximately.
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  #8  
Old 01-10-2010, 11:53 AM
Neverender Neverender is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groman View Post
Well some freezing processes might involve extra liquid, but I always thought that the liquid you get from defrosting things is just the product losing moisture due to broken cell walls. As in, you get the same amount of stuff but some of the water that was inside the fresh food has now leaked out.
Ah. Well that's cleared that up then.

Cheers everyone.
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