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  #1  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:17 PM
EmAnJ EmAnJ is offline
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Does your heart sometimes skip a beat or beat a extra pump?

Not looking for medical advice - I've already talked to a doctor and he didn't seem to be concerned. Just wondering if this is totally normal or not, as my doctor was an ass and didn't really want to talk for more then five minutes.

Every day, at least a dozen times or so, I will feel my heart either skip a beat or beat an extra pump in between normal beats. This sometimes happens when I am working out very hard, but also when I am in bed trying to sleep. Sometimes it'll happen more then once in a row and I put my fingers on my carotid artery to make sure this is really happening and it is.

The skip a beat feels like a pressure in the chest and then THUMP, a very hard beat, and then back to normal. The extra beat feels like my heart does a quick little flutter and then goes back to normal. I never feel pain, just pressure in my chest for a half a second, then all is normal.

I'm not sure if it matters, but I'm really active. I teach indoor cycling classes two or three days a week and run four days (right now it's anywhere between 3 and 8 miles per day). My cardiovascular endurance is very good and I'm pretty healthy (except for a bit too much sugar - damn you sugar!).

Does anyone else experience this? I wonder if it related to my fitness level, so could you also post what your fitness level is as well, if you don't mind?
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  #2  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:30 PM
sandra_nz sandra_nz is offline
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I get that occassionally, but by occassionally I mean maybe three or four times a year. I'm overweight and moderately fit.
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  #3  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:33 PM
Waxwinged Waxwinged is offline
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Yes, actually! It was terrifying as heck when that first started happening, in my early 20s.

Went to a doctor for it, and he said that it was just premature ventricular contractions, and I only had to worry if they started happening hundreds of times daily.

I'm in good shape, but got a history of heart problems in the family.. Laying off caffeine, taking magnesium supplements, and keeping stress level down seemed to have helped to keep the heart flutters to a minimum, but they still occur a few times a week.

Just one of those little quirks of life, I guess!
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  #4  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:37 PM
Hi Medlo Hi Medlo is offline
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That happens (or at least happened) to me, too, mostly extra beats but the skipped ones are what got me to the doctor. All the tests (stress test, stress echo cardiogram) showed nothing wrong and the cardiologist said "Some people are just like that."
I was in quite good condition at the time, walking twelve miles a day on my job and doing some distance running, too.
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  #5  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:41 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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Yes, I started to get this when I entered perimenopause. Cutting out alcohol and diet coke (especially the diet coke) made it go away. I was modestly overweight and generally fit.

As menopause advanced, I started getting palpitations in general, and these were fixed by my starting to take magnesium every day. Interestingly, the magnesium also took away that funny muscle twitching you get after walking or running. Another poster here said she had the same results.
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  #6  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:43 PM
wolfman wolfman is offline
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I got that in my twenties. Some time I go for weeks without one,(or maybe without noticing one) Most of the time one or two a day. Sometimes two or three a minute which freaked me out enough to go get a physical back in the day.

The conversation went like this:
Me: Doc, My heart is skipping beats.
Doc: You mean like a little sinking feeling in your pulse?
Me: Yes.
Doc: Ehh... hearts do that, good bye. Here's your bill.



I have noticed that the skipped beats are much more prominent the day after drinking.
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  #7  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:51 PM
redtail23 redtail23 is offline
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Yup, I do that all the time. Well, not daily anymore, but fairly frequently.

It is very disturbing, but the doc says not to worry. (I believe the parameters were, if it happens on *every* set of beats for more than 5 minutes, then worry.) They have done a bunch of tests on a couple of occasions to make sure it wasn't something problematic.

I've drastically reduced my caffeine, which has helped a lot. I was completely off caffeine for a while, but decided to moderate that. When I was not consuming caffeine, even a small amount would cause episodes, but usually the next day. (I know that makes no sense at all, it was just the pattern that I noticed.)

Stress also causes this effect for me, again often *after* I've stopped stressing. In fact, when my heart does this repeatedly, the increased heart rate from the tiny panic attack it engenders is often enough to make it quit.

I've had it happen occasionally when I was exercising (which I don't do regularly) - except that the extra beat is often so hard that it hurts. If I've done something to bring on the skips (e.g., anxiety attack or caffeine consumption), it will often happen after I'm relaxed in bed.

It's weird.
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  #8  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:52 PM
HenryGale HenryGale is offline
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Originally Posted by EmAnJ View Post
The skip a beat feels like a pressure in the chest and then THUMP, a very hard beat, and then back to normal. The extra beat feels like my heart does a quick little flutter and then goes back to normal. I never feel pain, just pressure in my chest for a half a second, then all is normal.

...

Does anyone else experience this? I wonder if it related to my fitness level, so could you also post what your fitness level is as well, if you don't mind?
I first noticed this a few years ago during some very trying times in my family, and again several months later, when wI had a stressful cross-country move. I think it's related to periods of high stress for me. I've also noticed it after drinking specifically Rockstar energy drink, but not Monster (??). The flutter-THUMP is EXACTLY what I experience.

This was a few years ago and I haven't experienced it since, so I chalked it up to nerves. I'm... not exactly a fit guy, so if you have it and I had it, I doubt it's a fitness level thing. At the time I experienced this, I had had some post-surgery physicals a year or so prior that didn't turn up anything to be concerned about.

Surgery was unrelated, BTW. Ruptured disc in my cervical spine.
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  #9  
Old 02-15-2010, 02:58 PM
Lunar Saltlick Lunar Saltlick is offline
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Premature Ventricular Beat (or Contraction). Happens to me a half a dozen times per year. My doctor said it was because of a "shitty" little weak electrical signal that gets thrown in there and tries to create an extra little weak beat. The weak little beat gums up the works a little, screws up the rhythm, and that final big thump is your heart putting its foot down, sending all the collected blood on in its rightful direction and getting the whole heart solidly back on beat. It's kinda like Keef is wandering off on his own and Ronnie's looking for his fags, see, not contributing, and Charlie's got to put his foot down, right, wiv a big beat and get them geezers back on track.
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  #10  
Old 02-15-2010, 03:00 PM
Capcha Capcha is offline
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In the end of my twenties, i get it a lot too (not so many per day though). If i drop dead, might as well.,
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  #11  
Old 02-15-2010, 03:12 PM
EmAnJ EmAnJ is offline
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Originally Posted by Lunar Saltlick View Post
Premature Ventricular Beat (or Contraction). Happens to me a half a dozen times per year. My doctor said it was because of a "shitty" little weak electrical signal that gets thrown in there and tries to create an extra little weak beat. The weak little beat gums up the works a little, screws up the rhythm, and that final big thump is your heart putting its foot down, sending all the collected blood on in its rightful direction and getting the whole heart solidly back on beat. It's kinda like Keef is wandering off on his own and Ronnie's looking for his fags, see, not contributing, and Charlie's got to put his foot down, right, wiv a big beat and get them geezers back on track.
Ahahahahaha! Very good description.

I think I'll start taking magnesium and see what happens. I don't drink alcohol, but I do have two cups of coffee every day.

I'm glad I'm not alone, and also glad I'm not alone in that is sends some people into a panic attack (me too!). I can control that now, but it was rough going for a while.
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  #12  
Old 02-15-2010, 04:05 PM
Chief Pedant Chief Pedant is offline
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You are having a symptom loosely grouped under "palpitations."

These can range from totally benign to harbingers of sudden death, and many many specific rhythm abnormalities underlie them, from premature ventricular and atrial contractions to short runs of atrial fibrillation or various supraventricular tachycardias.

The extent of evaluation is dependent on many factors (and no; a wallet biopsy should not be one of them).

Capturing rhythm disturbances with a recording mechanism such as an EKG or an electronic monitoring device can be quite useful, although both the abnormal beats and an understanding of any underlying condition of the heart are required for a proper evaluation.

Last edited by Chief Pedant; 02-15-2010 at 04:06 PM..
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  #13  
Old 02-15-2010, 04:17 PM
Daylate Daylate is offline
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I first started having those things in my early twenties. Mentioned them over the years to all my doctors and none of them was concerned in the slightest. Usually they would come in ones or twos (the palpitations, not the doctors), but sometimes often enough to be annoying. Some years ago they got bad enough that I started drinking decaffeinated coffee, which helped. Since then I've gone on and off drinking regular coffee, without much effect.

Since I've turned 80, I've decided those palpitations don't mean very much. And since this thread came up, I've just realized that they haven't occurred in over at least a year. Getting older must have some advantages. I remember my Father mentioning once that he had this problem. He only made it to 90, so it doesn't seem to be very deadly.

If your doctor isn't concerned, I wouldn't be either.
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  #14  
Old 02-15-2010, 07:10 PM
PapSett PapSett is offline
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Odd... I have been noticing this happening recently, and actually thought about nstarting a thread here about it.

I have noticed that it happens more frequently if I eat a couple dark chocolate covered coffee beans. Probably should stop those, but DAMN they're good...
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  #15  
Old 02-15-2010, 07:24 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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I have ectopics (skipped beats, not extra, in my case) come and go all the time. I haven't been able to figure out a reason for them, but I've been assured by doctors there's nothing wrong with me. They seem to be more prominent when I'm at my fittest. Or more noticeable, because my resting heart rate is much slower. I don't know. Anyhow, they really bugged the crap out of me. At their worst, I'd have several ectopics a minute. Last year, it really took a psychological toll on me, seriously worried the crap out of me, even though I had been assured there's nothing wrong with me. Reduction in caffeine didn't make a smidgen of difference. They went away this winter, and I've only had the mildest ectopics from time to time. There has been no significant change in my lifestyle. My diet is as healthy as it was before. If anything, I'm perhaps under slightly more stress. But the ectopics have virtually disappeared. My current fitness level is I run about 20-25 miles per week. When I was having a lot of ectopics, my fitness level was running 30-35 miles per week.

Get yourself checked out, but it's not an uncommon occurrence and very often (I dare say usually, but IANADoctor) is benign.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-15-2010 at 07:26 PM..
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  #16  
Old 02-15-2010, 07:56 PM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
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Creepy, ain't it? Especially when just falling off to sleep? Makes you think of mortality and stuff.
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  #17  
Old 02-15-2010, 08:05 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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I had really bad palpitations during Christmas a couple years ago that lasted a few days. It was a horrible feeling! (I did do a lot of drinking that week, though it never happened in previous years.) I called my medical center and told whoever answered about it and in a bored voice she said maybe I should stop drinking coffee, alcohol, and give up the cigs. I did stop coffee cold turkey, and THAT was TRULY frightening, it felt like I had the flu - headaches and talk about tired! Switched to decaff for a while. The palpitations went away, but it was a horrid feeling.
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  #18  
Old 02-15-2010, 11:39 PM
stanger stanger is offline
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I have had something like this for about 10 years now. I thought it was skipped beats, but when it finally happened when I was hooked up to a machine, it turned out that my heart was "throwing" extra beats. The doctor said that there are different types of this, and what I had was no reason for concern.

I will go weeks without having any, then maybe it will bother me for five minutes and go away, a few times a year it may bother me for a couple of hours. It only seems to last ten seconds or so, then stops, then comes back in a few minutes.

I am taking Metoprolol for high blood pressure and the doctor said that this medication also helps prevent this problem, so it usually only bothers me nowadays when I am due to take a pill.

It doesn't come with exertion, it doesn't cause any pain or discomfort. The only way I know it is happening is I get a feeling deep in my throat from when the heart tries to set things straight again.
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  #19  
Old 02-16-2010, 12:03 AM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is offline
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Omg I love this thread. I thought I was the only one this happened to, and that I was gonna die from it. Cool.
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  #20  
Old 02-16-2010, 01:06 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Sir T-Cups View Post
Omg I love this thread. I thought I was the only one this happened to, and that I was gonna die from it. Cool.
Look up "ectopic heart beat" and you'll find support groups for it. Reading them can help ease your worries. Also made me realize that as enervating as my symptoms were, many have it much, much worse. Mine at least go away for long periods of time.
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  #21  
Old 02-16-2010, 08:00 AM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is online now
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Adding my voice to the chorus . . .

I had them in my midtwenties as well. My pulse would go ba-dump, ba-dump, ba-dump, ba-dump . . . KA-THUNK!!!! . . . ba-dump, ba-dump, ba-dump . . . If I was wearing a silky shirt with the fabric resting against my skin, you could SEE it jump. Damn straight it was scary.

I had a battery of tests and everything came back normal. Doc said, "Paroxysmal atrial tachycardia [which basically means occasional irregular beats in the upper chambers of the heart]; lay off the caffeine." At the time I was consuming mass quantities of Coca-Cola. I duly laid off the Coke, and that particular form hasn't come back.

A few years ago I had palpitations that seemed to be stress-related; it turned out that I had a slight thyroid imbalance that eventually went away. I may have taken medication for a brief period; I don't recall.
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  #22  
Old 02-16-2010, 08:58 AM
ladyfoxfyre ladyfoxfyre is offline
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Me too....I went back to my cardiologist (I have AV-node reentrant tachycardia) because anything wonky with my heart is concerning to me. They hooked me up to a Holter monitor and said, yeah, it's normal, don't worry about it. BTW you still have AVRT, which you know.

I was similarly weirded out but I guess it's not a big deal. To me it always felt like my heart dropped a bit and then did an extra beat to make up for it. MD said it was stress related and to work out more, to get my heart accustomed to the adrenaline or something like that.
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  #23  
Old 02-16-2010, 09:05 AM
panache45 panache45 is online now
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I started having them about 20 years ago, in my 40s. It's exactly like the OP describes, a missed beat followed by a strong one, plus a strange feeling in my chest, up into my throat. It started happening once or twice a year, and got progressively more frequent until many times a day. There was a period in which it was happening more than once a minute. Lately, though, I'm not experiencing it more than a few times a day.

I'm not as thin or active as I should be, and caffeine doesn't seem to affect it. I have noticed, however, that it seems to happen when I'm at rest, both mentally and physically . . . watching tv or falling asleep in bed.
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  #24  
Old 02-16-2010, 09:10 AM
Sateryn76 Sateryn76 is offline
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Originally Posted by Sir T-Cups View Post
Omg I love this thread. I thought I was the only one this happened to, and that I was gonna die from it. Cool.
Me too! Yea Dopers!
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  #25  
Old 02-16-2010, 10:01 AM
EmAnJ EmAnJ is offline
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I surprised at how common this is, and I'm really glad you all are sharing your stories. I knew I wasn't dying (probably), but I didn't know how common this was. Nice to know we're not alone!

Also, I'm irritated that I missed an 'n' in the title of the thread. Humph.
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  #26  
Old 02-16-2010, 11:20 AM
Snickers Snickers is offline
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Yep, I have it too, but I haven't noticed it lately. Most often I'd notice it when falling asleep, and it would bug me. It would happen about every 5th beat or so, but my doctor said (like everyone else's) that this is most likely normal and not to worry about it until it became much more frequent. I haven't paid too much attention lately; perhaps I should.

What's happening more frequently is the pounding. Every once in a while (like once a month, maybe?) there'll be a period of time where my heart speeds up and just pounds for 5-10 seconds. WHAM! WHAM! WHAM! WHAM! WHAM! wham! and done. This bothers me more, and I'll be asking my doctor about it at my next physical. Which will probably be in March - I'm waiting to schedule it until I hear she's off of her maternity leave. I'm kind of hoping that it's just Charlie really getting the slacker guys' attention.

I'm 33, 15 pounds overweight, and definitely not as fit as I could be - I've been a couch potato lately and need to start working out again.

Last edited by Snickers; 02-16-2010 at 11:20 AM..
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  #27  
Old 02-16-2010, 11:42 AM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Not to rain on anyone's parade, I once failed blood donation thanks to a racy pulse, which I was sure was due to drinking lots of Mountain Dew for lunch that day. I went to my GP, who found that my heart was very irregular. I got put on a Holter also (fun thing) and it was found that I had a fairly bad case of atrial fibrillation. One attempt to reboot my heart failed, and I was lined up for another, but a medicine I was given fixed the problem in the three days before my last doctor visit and being put on the table. They canceled the procedure, and I've been fine since.

The danger is that blood pools in your heart because it is not pumped adequately due to the arhythmia, which leads to an increased risk of stroke. I've been on Coumadin ever since, and go once a month to get my INR checked. (Just this morning, in fact.)

I still feel it once in a while - it feels like my cellphone on vibrate mode just went off - but otherwise I'm fine. I'm also old enough so that it is of concern, though my blood pressure is excellent and always has been.
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  #28  
Old 02-16-2010, 12:50 PM
Happy_Booker Happy_Booker is offline
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
Not to rain on anyone's parade, I once failed blood donation thanks to a racy pulse, which I was sure was due to drinking lots of Mountain Dew for lunch that day. I went to my GP, who found that my heart was very irregular. I got put on a Holter also (fun thing) and it was found that I had a fairly bad case of atrial fibrillation. One attempt to reboot my heart failed, and I was lined up for another, but a medicine I was given fixed the problem in the three days before my last doctor visit and being put on the table. They canceled the procedure, and I've been fine since.

The danger is that blood pools in your heart because it is not pumped adequately due to the arhythmia, which leads to an increased risk of stroke. I've been on Coumadin ever since, and go once a month to get my INR checked. (Just this morning, in fact.)
What he said.

I lived with AFib for may years. Like Voyager, mine was discovered when I tried to give blood. Many doctors haven't stayed current with the literature and continue to treat it as a nuisance condition. It does, however, significantly raise the risk of stroke due to the pooling and clotting of the blood.

It also can have a significant impact on quality of life. In my case a prolonged session (and I had some that literally lasted weeks) would make me not only feel tired and generally like crap, but would make me feel like I'd lost 30 IQ points. I had half a dozen or so cardioversions (rebooting with paddles). Sometimes they worked for a period of weeks; sometimes they were effective for only a matter of hours. The coumadin reduced the risk of stroke, but not the other effects. The other drugs were pretty much ineffective. I finally had a procedure called a cardioablation. A catheter is inserted into one of the atria. The catheter is used to burn and scar the interior of the atrium to inhibit the 'wild' electrical impulses that cause the fib. (On a bad day, my resting pulse rate could hit 200.) That's kind of procedure that folks like Tony Blair, Bill Bradley and (I suspect) the Maple Leafs' goaltender have had. It actually took three tries (6 to 9 months apart) for that procedure to work, but I've now been fib free for about 5 years. (And I don't have to take coumadin any more either.)
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  #29  
Old 02-16-2010, 01:00 PM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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I had not one, not 2, but 3 cardiologists tell me that having skipped beats more than occasionally can be benign, but it can also be a sign that there is some blockage in an artery.
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  #30  
Old 02-16-2010, 01:05 PM
dangermom dangermom is offline
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Yep, I developed an arrythmia a while ago--it probably happens a couple of times a week. I did a stress test and it only happens when I'm at rest, so they aren't worried about it, but I'm keeping an eye on it.

ETA: I'm strong and in good health, have decent endurance, but I should lose some weight.

Last edited by dangermom; 02-16-2010 at 01:06 PM..
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  #31  
Old 02-16-2010, 01:26 PM
Pocito Pocito is offline
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I just turned thirty and am in pretty good shape and I get those weird beats when I'm pregnant or if I haven't been getting enough sleep. That's also when I get the restless legs feeling, so I think it's all tied to temporary circulation glitches.
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  #32  
Old 02-17-2010, 06:27 PM
PandaBear77 PandaBear77 is offline
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I've had the same thing happen for ages - since my teen years. I find it happens more often if I've lost a lot of sleep, had too much caffeine or if my period's about to start.
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  #33  
Old 02-17-2010, 09:51 PM
LateComer LateComer is offline
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August of 2008 I was at my doctor and they had trouble taking my pulse (I was 39). They gave me an ekg and saw extra beats. Sent it to cardiologist who scheduled me for a stress test. During the test they kept looking at me funny, asking how I felt. I felt fatigued more so than I thought I should. I had had trouble all summer with exercising-couldn't get up the motivation to bicycle, out of breath walking stairs. I thought I was just out of shape and was trying to get back into shape; indeed I had taken a 20 mile bike ride the week before my Doctor's visit and had felt good.

They told me that my heart momentarily went up to 220 bpm during the test and made me an appointment with an electro-cardiologist in Pittsburgh (Allegheny General). This Doctor called me and said "yes, we need to see you, but not in the office, in the hospital." The extra beats and the tachycardia were ventricular which I learned was bad. I had a 4 hour long attempt to perform a cardiac ablation on the bad area (catheter put up into heart through the thighs and they measure the electric charge and burn the affected area) but unfortunately they couldnít find the offending part of my heart. No matter how much adrenaline they gave me my heart beat in a perfect sinus rhythm until I came out of sedation at which time it jumped back into its habit of extra beats. They tried drugs until it went back into sinus rhythm (lidocaine was what worked) and gave me anti-seizure drugs (dilantin) which they said worked like the lodicaine in pill form.

For about a month I was fine on the drugs and one day I was walking across campus at work and had a dizzy spell. I felt my pulse and couldnít for the life of me figure out if I had those extra beats. I wonder about how you guys feel the odd beats, I never really felt them. Anyway I didnít feel right and made my way to the hospital and found that my resting heart rate had jumped to about 130 bpm. I was like a sideshow, everyone wanted to see this guy with the Ventricular tachycardia who was perfectly conscious and not seemingly in discomfort. Honestly I barely noticed except for looking at the monitor.

They sent me back to Pittsburgh and during my stay (I roomed with a 90 year old WWII vet who lived with his great-grandsons(!) but thatís another story) I would often get a knock on the bathroom door because when I got up my HR went up to like 170 and they were afraid I might pass out. But they learned to ignore this.

The electro-cardiologist gave me this choice: They could attempt another ablation and if it didnít work they would send me to Cleveland Clinic where they specialize in this sort of thing to have it done again or they just could send me to Cleveland in the first place. I chose the latter and took a nice helicopter ride. There they did the catheter in Cleveland as well as the outside of the heart (itís easier to do the inside because they can get there through the arteries). They put a needle under your sternum, through the diaphragm to get to the outside of the heart. They tried to do it with only local anesthetic but that didnít work out for me so they did put me under. I did see the catheter in my heart at the beginning and end when I woke up (they use a fluoroscope).

Sorry for the length of this post. Anyway they fixed it. They tell me that I can ride roller coasters and such, stating that Iím basically fixed though Iím at risk of it happening again. Itís more than a year and Iím fine and have had no incidents. I play racquetball 3-5 times a week and biked 1200 miles last summer. Enjoy not needing surgery for your problem. As far as surgery goes it's pretty easy but I don't recommend it if you don't need it.
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  #34  
Old 02-17-2010, 10:46 PM
appleciders appleciders is offline
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Started having them in my teens. I'll get them several a minute, three or four times a day, for maybe a week, and only about two weeks a year. Loading up on caffeine or sugar can trigger it. It's obnoxious, but not painful.
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  #35  
Old 02-18-2010, 07:31 AM
kferr kferr is offline
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Originally Posted by Happy_Booker View Post
What he said.

I lived with AFib for may years. Like Voyager, mine was discovered when I tried to give blood. Many doctors haven't stayed current with the literature and continue to treat it as a nuisance condition. It does, however, significantly raise the risk of stroke due to the pooling and clotting of the blood.

It also can have a significant impact on quality of life. In my case a prolonged session (and I had some that literally lasted weeks) would make me not only feel tired and generally like crap, but would make me feel like I'd lost 30 IQ points. I had half a dozen or so cardioversions (rebooting with paddles). Sometimes they worked for a period of weeks; sometimes they were effective for only a matter of hours. The coumadin reduced the risk of stroke, but not the other effects. The other drugs were pretty much ineffective. I finally had a procedure called a cardioablation. A catheter is inserted into one of the atria. The catheter is used to burn and scar the interior of the atrium to inhibit the 'wild' electrical impulses that cause the fib. (On a bad day, my resting pulse rate could hit 200.) That's kind of procedure that folks like Tony Blair, Bill Bradley and (I suspect) the Maple Leafs' goaltender have had. It actually took three tries (6 to 9 months apart) for that procedure to work, but I've now been fib free for about 5 years. (And I don't have to take coumadin any more either.)
Me too. Afib runs in my family. My dad (87) has a pacemaker, my brother (56) has had 2 ablations. So far for me (47) the medication, Flecainide acetate, is working very well.
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  #36  
Old 02-18-2010, 08:55 AM
Elysian Elysian is offline
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I started having skipped beats like that right after the time my dad almost died from a heart attack. They scared me silly, and still scare the crap out of me sometimes. They hooked me up to a heart monitor for a couple of weeks and the doctor said I was fine, even though I was having them five or six times a day.

I spoke to one of my coworkers about them. She is a retired nurse, and used to have them too, but she's 66 now and doesn't think they'll kill me

I'm 32, run three times a week and walk everywhere since I don't have a car. Frankly I'm overweight, but I had that heart monitor when I was thin and the weight gain hasn't seemed to have changed the frequency one bit. One thing that will almost guarantee that I will get them is consuming anything with high sugar. Sugar is very bad for me in a lot of ways but I can't seem to stop!
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Old 02-18-2010, 09:13 AM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Did they do an actual halter monitor type test that measures your heartbeat over a few days?

You may also find that "extra heartbeat" you're feeling isn't your heart at all but another muscle that you think is an extra beat.

Too much caffeine + not enough sleep will give me a "heart thump"
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  #38  
Old 02-18-2010, 10:08 AM
Ruffian Ruffian is offline
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I call those my "heart hiccups." I've had them on and off for years, and my docs said they were just PVCs as described upthread. I get them maaaaybe once a week or so for a beat or two, unless I'm pregnant--then they're making their annoying presence known on and off all day. SO annoying. They were so uncomfortable in my last pregnancy, I couldn't rest lying flat on my back. OB and GP docs both agreed their increase in frequency was due to all the cardiovascular chnages that go with pregnancy (doubling blood volume, creating a new blood supply network, etc.). I had them fairly frequently from around20-22 weeks with my first, and about from 5 weeks-26 weeks (boo!) with my second.
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  #39  
Old 02-18-2010, 10:10 AM
ratatoskK ratatoskK is online now
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I get it too, around once a month, usually when I'm trying to fall asleep. I'm glad to hear it's normal!!
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  #40  
Old 02-18-2010, 10:23 AM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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I would also add that skipped/extra/louder solitary heartbeat triggers a solitary cough with me. I posted a question about this, and QtM posited that it might be that the weird heartbeat stimulates the vagus nerve.
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  #41  
Old 02-18-2010, 10:52 PM
The Second Stone The Second Stone is offline
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Yes, mine misses a beat sometimes. Despite being a heart patient for other reasons, my doctors and I don't worry about it.
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  #42  
Old 02-19-2010, 11:38 AM
choie choie is offline
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Yes, mine does a couple of times a week, on average. In fact, I'm wearing a Holter monitor even as I type this, to see what's up. I'd complained about this to my GP, who works with a cardiologist, so he referred me to the cardiologist, who did an EKG and echocardiagram and declared my heart healthy (surprisingly so considering I'm out of shape). But he's giving me the Holter just to be on the safe side, since I'm more likely to experience the little heart "skips" during a 24-hour test than during the brief periods of the EKG / echocardiagram.

I have a bit of a panic disorder thang, and have had incidents of tachycardia that seem to have been the result of panic attacks rather than any heart ailment. Stress is apparently one possible cause for palpitations like this.
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  #43  
Old 02-19-2010, 12:28 PM
Rushgeekgirl Rushgeekgirl is offline
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Add me to the list. Happens more when I have too much caffeine I believe.
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  #44  
Old 02-19-2010, 06:21 PM
Jeep's Phoenix Jeep's Phoenix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elysian View Post
I started having skipped beats like that right after the time my dad almost died from a heart attack. They scared me silly, and still scare the crap out of me sometimes. They hooked me up to a heart monitor for a couple of weeks and the doctor said I was fine, even though I was having them five or six times a day.
I started having skipped beats shortly after my father died (due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy according to the autopsy). It would feel almost like a little skip or flutter, then a very brief pause, followed by an extra-strong feeling thump. This skipping was definitely apparent during an echocardiogram; however, the cardiologist didn't seem very concerned and thought it seemed to be stress related. I only get them now when I'm really, really stressed; when they do occur, it only happens for a brief period of time.
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  #45  
Old 02-07-2012, 02:54 PM
Trent99 Trent99 is offline
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I get the same thing! Glad I found this!
It feels like my heart valve stays open and blood rushes out after a big heart beat...then goes back to normal.
Went to my GP ...he said I'm fine, but sent me for tests...6+ years ago now...they came back with nothing....it still happens.
May be 1 time per day...may go without for days at a time...since I was in my teens...I am 39 now.
Smoked since I was 15...crazy that it seemed to have started when I started smoking...almost 25 years of smoking and I am quitting this week...12 cigs left in my pack...wish me luck!
VERY scared, but excited too.
Scary to have your heart act weird..it is what keeps us alive.
My mom passed away from a massive heart attack at 56, (smoker) and my dad has already had open heart surgery (70 years old now - smoker)
I want to break this trend.
C'mon heart...keep pumpin...lol.
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  #46  
Old 02-08-2012, 11:53 AM
MLS MLS is offline
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I was in my late 20s when my OB/GYN noticed an irregular heartbeat during a routine checkup. I didn't know what he was talking about. "There -- did you feel that?" "Feel what?" I was thin and healthy at the time. He sent me to a cardiologist to check it out and the verdict was "Fine, nothing to worry about." An interesting thing was that he would hear the extra or skipped beat when I was resting, but if I did some mild exercise like a few situps, the beat evened out. Like a car that runs rough at a slow idle but smooths out when you step on the gas.
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  #47  
Old 02-08-2012, 12:01 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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I had a spell of this where it was happening several times per hour. My cardiogist had me wear a recorder that transmitted daily results over the phone for analysis. After a couple of weeks, they went away. I believe they were due to some old fashioned horehound candy drops I was using at that time. When I ran out, the palpitations stopped.

Last edited by Fear Itself; 02-08-2012 at 12:01 PM..
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  #48  
Old 02-08-2012, 03:37 PM
picunurse picunurse is offline
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They are called premature ventricular or contractions or premature atrial contractions.
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  #49  
Old 02-08-2012, 04:16 PM
Sattua Sattua is offline
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The only time anything like this happens to me is when my Synthroid needs to be dialed down. That and insomnia are how I can tell I'm over-replaced.
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  #50  
Old 02-08-2012, 04:53 PM
EmAnJ EmAnJ is offline
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Luckily for me, my zombie heart quit skipping beats once I cut down on coffee and stress.
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