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  #1  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:07 PM
Fotheringay-Phipps Fotheringay-Phipps is offline
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Why Are My Toilets Constantly Getting Clogged?

This didn't used to happen when we first built the house (about 10-15 years ago). But now it's several times a week. My wife thinks the toilets are junk, but as above, it's a more recent phenomenon.

So I'm wondering if there's some amount of clog that never gets removed from plunging or snaking, possibly in the pipes, such that a smaller amount of waste clogs it up.

Does that make sense? And if so, what do you do about it?
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  #2  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:11 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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Did you change brand or type of TP? Thicker strength TP tends to clog us up.
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  #3  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:20 PM
Philster Philster is offline
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Public sewer system or septic system/tank?

What types of things do you flush or send down the drains in all parts of the house? Even tissues (for noses) can cause problems.

Do you know if your vents are clear? Blocked vents can really slow things down even if the sewer pipe in the house is good and clear.

If the plumbing is really clogged, a plumber might have to access your clean out points in the system, which basically involved unscrewing end caps and doing a real 'roto' type cleaning, direct into the sewage/waste pipe in your home or on your property. This is done in the basement, right into the waste pipe. No going 'round sinks/j pipes/toilets, etc.

The vents might require a similar/direct cleaning.

Last edited by Philster; 02-18-2010 at 01:23 PM..
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  #4  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:24 PM
ethelbert ethelbert is offline
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Any plumbing system has air vents. If these vents get clogged the water drains much more slowly and the pipes are more easily clogged. I don't really know how you might check this (except maybe ask your plumber).

Oops. beaten to the punch.

Last edited by ethelbert; 02-18-2010 at 01:25 PM..
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  #5  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:24 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is online now
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I had a plumber out last month for a non-toilet issue. We were chatting and he said his next call was for a stopped up toilet. "They're not going to like what I tell them," he said "they need to get a new toilet."

I asked him what he meant by that, and he said that if your toilet gets stopped up a lot or if it gets stopped up to the point where you need a plumber, then you need to replace the toilet.

I told him I thought that was weird...a toilet is just a vessel for water to go in and out. If it's not cracked, why replace it? How does it stop stuff from going down? What's the difference between a $50 and a $300 toilet anyway?

He said that the construction of the inside of the toilet is the difference in price, as well as the materials. If the toilet is collecting junk inside of it, it needs to be replaced. This will happen sooner/more often on a cheap toilet than an expensive toilet.

So, your wife might be right. It might be time for a new toilet, because yours is just plain gunked up inside.
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  #6  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:33 PM
Squink Squink is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
This didn't used to happen when we first built the house (about 10-15 years ago). But now it's several times a week.
Long ago, I moved into a rental where the toilet clogged several times a week. Turned the previous tenant had dropped a tootbrush down there, and it had wedged in the neck of the siphon. I got it out with a pipesnake. A plunger would not touch it.
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  #7  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:40 PM
Fotheringay-Phipps Fotheringay-Phipps is offline
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It can't be too far down the system because otherwise all the toilets would be clogged at the same time (as would the sinks, FTM). And I've snaked them many times, which always works to unclog them, but not to prevent a recurrance (which is another reason it can't be too far down - unlike a plunger, a snake wouldn't work on what it can't reach). So I'm thinking maybe the snake is leaving stuff on the sides, but I doubt if it could be something like a toothbrush.

The only toilets that have this problem are the kids' bathroom and the family one. The master bathroom does not. But I don't know if this is due to different bathroom habits, or - more likely, IMHO - to the fact that it gets much less usage.

One thing I'm not too keen on is replacing a toilet. Yuck.
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  #8  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:41 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Supposedly tampons can also clog up the pipes along the way, and may take a while to build up to a "critical mass" of clogging. (Unbeknownst to most women, you probably shouldn't flush used tampons.)
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  #9  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:49 PM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post

One thing I'm not too keen on is replacing a toilet. Yuck.

Not that bad. Helps if you have someone help you lift it. But it's not like there's a disgusting cesspool waiting below -- all the waste gets washed away. You can stick a rag in the pipe while you're working if you're squeamish -- just don't forget to remove it when you're done.
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  #10  
Old 02-18-2010, 02:13 PM
TV time TV time is offline
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The time frame you have established also allow for tree roots coming into play with the pipes. Is this a possibility?
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  #11  
Old 02-18-2010, 02:21 PM
SanDiegoTim SanDiegoTim is offline
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Are your toilet the newer/low flow units?
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  #12  
Old 02-18-2010, 02:32 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
The only toilets that have this problem are the kids' bathroom and the family one. The master bathroom does not. But I don't know if this is due to different bathroom habits, or - more likely, IMHO - to the fact that it gets much less usage.
Is there a vent pipe for that area of the house? The vent pipe may have become plugged.
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  #13  
Old 02-18-2010, 02:33 PM
crazyjoe crazyjoe is offline
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I second the idea of checking to make sure nothing "irregular" has been flushed. I have heard plenty of stories about rubber ducks, other kids toys, toothbrushes, pagers, etc getting flushed and later the realization that this is causing blockages.

You know that ad where they show people flushing down a bowlful of golf balls? Yeah, you shouldn't really try that, either
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  #14  
Old 02-18-2010, 02:36 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps
The only toilets that have this problem are the kids' bathroom and the family one. The master bathroom does not.
And the kids never use the master bath, right?

I've seen things get stuck inside toilets that successfully evade snaking - toothbrushes are in the Plumbers' Hall of Fame for this. You can snake right past a toothbrush and not know it's in there, but the next chunk of stuff will get stuck. Similarly, pencils, pens, popsicle sticks, mascara bottles, and similar long skinny things can do this.

Most often, the only cure is to take the toilet off and push the offending thing out from below. Yeah, I know. Ick.

Ten to fifteen year old low-flow toilets are junk, compared to what's available now. If this was my house, I'd start by just replacing the toilet. I've had very good results with Toto. Eljer and American Standard also make "performance" toilets that are well-regarded, though I have no direct experience with them.

Another possibility is that the sewer vent is clogged, but that usually shows itself as slow flushing, rather than clogs, and sinks draining slowly and going glug-glug-glug. Usually, you have to attack this from on the roof.
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Old 02-18-2010, 03:18 PM
Sateryn76 Sateryn76 is offline
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Originally Posted by gotpasswords View Post
And the kids never use the master bath, right?

I've seen things get stuck inside toilets that successfully evade snaking - toothbrushes are in the Plumbers' Hall of Fame for this. You can snake right past a toothbrush and not know it's in there, but the next chunk of stuff will get stuck. Similarly, pencils, pens, popsicle sticks, mascara bottles, and similar long skinny things can do this.

Most often, the only cure is to take the toilet off and push the offending thing out from below. Yeah, I know. Ick.

Ten to fifteen year old low-flow toilets are junk, compared to what's available now. If this was my house, I'd start by just replacing the toilet. I've had very good results with Toto. Eljer and American Standard also make "performance" toilets that are well-regarded, though I have no direct experience with them.

Another possibility is that the sewer vent is clogged, but that usually shows itself as slow flushing, rather than clogs, and sinks draining slowly and going glug-glug-glug. Usually, you have to attack this from on the roof.
We just put a Eijer in a totally new bathroom, and I'm having problems with clogs.

All the pipe runs were new, and the toilet usually flushes fine. But, I've had to stop flushing tampons, and my daughter often clogs the toilet with her poops.

There is no backup in any other sink or toilet in the house. I have no idea why this happens, but it drives me crazy, and makes me afraid we're going to have to rip out all of the plumbing we installed to redo it
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  #16  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:23 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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A totally different possibility:

Back when my father was alive, I remember my mother mentioning that the toilet was getting clogged more than it had been . . . only when he had used it. The problem went away when he died. Apparently, as some people age, their crap can get thicker and/or more "solid." sometimes causing blockage.
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  #17  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:26 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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good flushing action depends on rapid water introduction and rapid air venting and rapid water discharge.

the toilet rim and siphon jet can narrow with mineralization and prevent good siphon starting. you can test this with a water flush, rapidly pour a bucket of water right above the siphon hole right after doing the handle. if this improves the flushing then it might be water introduction being the problem.
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  #18  
Old 02-18-2010, 04:02 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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My toothbrush! I've been looking all over for it.

brushbrushbrushbrushbrush

Ah, nothing beats a clean mouth.
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  #19  
Old 02-18-2010, 04:18 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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Hmmmm... maybe those two toilets are on the same vent? Are they above/beside each other? When the vent is clogged, you can get a gurgling as the flush surge sucks air down the drain from the nearby sinks and toilets. That's a clue. If so, climb up on the roof and see if some stupid bird has built a nest which has fallen down and plugged tyour vent.

Roots are another problem; or if the sewer line is somehow damaged, and has been slowly collapsing in the yard; but normally that would be something that happens in the whole house.

It could be just poor flush volume as mentioned, especially if the other toilets are a cheaper brand/model than the master bathroom. I seriously doubt its "buildup" or you would notice it every time you snake.
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  #20  
Old 02-18-2010, 04:26 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
One thing I'm not too keen on is replacing a toilet. Yuck.
Before you go and replace the toilet, try actually removing it (unbolting it and taking it off the waste pipe in the floor. Then look inside it -- actually run your hand/arm* all the way up from the bottom and feel around to check for anything like a toothbrush, etc. caught in there. Also, if it feels rough inside the toilet, rather than smooth porcelain -- that will be a constant problem: replace the toilet (with a better quality one). And look down the waste pipe (a flashlight may help) to see if anything is caught there.

Doing this, you are about halfway to replacing the toilet. So it's best to do this on a day/time when the stores are open, so if you do have to replace the toilet, you can just run to the store and get a new one right then. And make sure you have enough time available to finish the project.

Also, even if you find something caught inside and remove it, you should consider replacing the wax ring that seals the toilet to the waste pipe. Anytime you unbolt & remove the toilet it's possible that this won't seal tightly again. And it only costs about $5, so go ahead and replace it before resetting the toilet.

* Yeah, possibly yucky. But you can always wash & scrub your arm afterwards.
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Old 02-18-2010, 04:33 PM
minor7flat5 minor7flat5 is offline
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Just stopping by to sing the praises of the American Standard "Champion" series.

We used to have a sixties-era toilet in our main bathroom that always needed a quick pitcherful of water tossed in at flush time to help things along. When the tank cracked, I replaced the toilet with a Champion. It has never clogged. There is never a need to flush twice. And it does this by artfully using the three teaspoonfulls of water that are allowed in modern toilets.
Last year I redid our half bath. I put a Champion in it.

This is the toilet that they advertise by flushing 20 or so golf balls in one go.

ETA: They have small, medium, and large hole sizes. Don't know why anyone would ever buy anything but the biggest.

Last edited by minor7flat5; 02-18-2010 at 04:38 PM..
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  #22  
Old 02-18-2010, 07:17 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Originally Posted by minor7flat5 View Post
ETA: They have small, medium, and large hole sizes. Don't know why anyone would ever buy anything but the biggest.
Probably to match the size of the waste pipe already installed in the bathroom floor.
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  #23  
Old 02-18-2010, 07:55 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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We've had lots of clogs, but only one was from something in the toilet. "Oh, that's where those missing car keys went" said my wife. But if you take the toilet off, you'll soon see if there are any clogs in it.

All the other times it has been roots or other stuff clogging up the sewer pipe. The toilet in the master bath is further from the street than the others, which is an indicator. After one time of calling a plumber with not so good results, we now use the trap at the side and front of the house, rent an electric snake, and clean it out ourselves, always with excellent results. It costs something like $60, and you don't have to wait for the plumber.

It is one of the more useful house skills I've learned.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:02 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
Hmmmm... maybe those two toilets are on the same vent? Are they above/beside each other? When the vent is clogged, you can get a gurgling as the flush surge sucks air down the drain from the nearby sinks and toilets. That's a clue. If so, climb up on the roof and see if some stupid bird has built a nest which has fallen down and plugged tyour vent.
You explained this better that I did in my post above. The vent that draws air in is a part of the system that often gets over looked. When the flush stuff is going down the pipe the vent must be clear so that air can be drawn in, or you create a suction that stops the flow.

If you keep having the same problem, and you have snaked the pipes several times already, make sure the vent is clear before looking for a larger problem.
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  #25  
Old 02-18-2010, 08:43 PM
gonzomax gonzomax is offline
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My wife plugs the upstairs one regularly. I tell her we have 2 inch pipes and she has 3 inch poops.
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  #26  
Old 02-18-2010, 08:52 PM
Joey P Joey P is online now
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Another thing to check for is dental floss. The plumbers I've spoken to have said the dental floss will, over time, accumulate and cause a really nasty clog that you have to take the toilet off to clear.

Anyone flushing dental floss in the problem toilets?
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  #27  
Old 02-18-2010, 09:48 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
We've had lots of clogs, but only one was from something in the toilet. "Oh, that's where those missing car keys went" said my wife. But if you take the toilet off, you'll soon see if there are any clogs in it.

All the other times it has been roots or other stuff clogging up the sewer pipe. The toilet in the master bath is further from the street than the others, which is an indicator. After one time of calling a plumber with not so good results, we now use the trap at the side and front of the house, rent an electric snake, and clean it out ourselves, always with excellent results. It costs something like $60, and you don't have to wait for the plumber.

It is one of the more useful house skills I've learned.
Is the electric snake easy to control? I have a recurring problem, and I've considered it, but I have a mental image of it bucking in my hands like a jackhammer and shattering my old pipes as it flailed.
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Old 02-18-2010, 10:15 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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Is the electric snake easy to control? I have a recurring problem, and I've considered it, but I have a mental image of it bucking in my hands like a jackhammer and shattering my old pipes as it flailed.
an electric one can be hard to control for someone not experienced with it. an electric one can also easily mar plumbing fixtures especially toilets. electric ones work OK going straight into drain pipes or cleanouts. a closet snake(auger) is made to protect toilets, it has a curved tube the snake travels in to make it into the toilet hole, so it doesn't scratch the bowl.
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  #29  
Old 02-19-2010, 10:21 AM
crazyjoe crazyjoe is offline
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If your problem can be accessed by running the electric snake through a cleanout, that is the best way. Also be aware that those electric snakes you can rent are HEAVY. The consumer grade units can work fine, and weigh in at about 50 - 75 lbs. The commercial grade units you get at the home improvement store can weigh 100 - 150lbs, so just getting it in and out of the car can be fun.
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  #30  
Old 02-19-2010, 10:38 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
This didn't used to happen when we first built the house (about 10-15 years ago). But now it's several times a week. My wife thinks the toilets are junk, but as above, it's a more recent phenomenon.

So I'm wondering if there's some amount of clog that never gets removed from plunging or snaking, possibly in the pipes, such that a smaller amount of waste clogs it up.

Does that make sense? And if so, what do you do about it?
The most likely cause is an obstruction such as a toothbrush, pen, Q-Tip stuck in either the trap on the toilet or in the drain pipe. Solid matter, paper products, etc. snag and/or wrap around it causing the blockage. Whenever you plunge or snake you clean off the debris but will it build back up after several uses.
You'll have to lift the toilet and check the trap and snake from there.

A word of caution, plunging can force a blockage either up into the air vent or past it which will be more difficult to remedy.
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  #31  
Old 02-19-2010, 12:41 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by Tom Tildrum View Post
Is the electric snake easy to control? I have a recurring problem, and I've considered it, but I have a mental image of it bucking in my hands like a jackhammer and shattering my old pipes as it flailed.
It does take a bit of practice. Once in the pipes it is fine, but if you leave too much slack it could take off an arm. My neighbor showed me how to use it. It has a footpad for control, so you need to be coordinated enough to take your foot off the pad if it starts shaking. And always work in pairs.

However, I'm not particularly coordinated but I can use it with no problems, and it is very satisfying to do it yourself.
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Old 02-19-2010, 12:44 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
an electric one can be hard to control for someone not experienced with it. an electric one can also easily mar plumbing fixtures especially toilets. electric ones work OK going straight into drain pipes or cleanouts. a closet snake(auger) is made to protect toilets, it has a curved tube the snake travels in to make it into the toilet hole, so it doesn't scratch the bowl.
I'd never use the electric one inside. First we use a plunger and a normal snake, and only get the electric one after that no longer works. Our problem is between the house and the street, mostly, so some sort of power snake is absolutely necessary.
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Old 02-19-2010, 12:46 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
The most likely cause is an obstruction such as a toothbrush, pen, Q-Tip stuck in either the trap on the toilet or in the drain pipe. Solid matter, paper products, etc. snag and/or wrap around it causing the blockage. Whenever you plunge or snake you clean off the debris but will it build back up after several uses.
You'll have to lift the toilet and check the trap and snake from there.
And remember, that if you do this you will have to replace the wax seal between toilet and floor. The good news is that wax seals are about the cheapest things sold in hardware stores.
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Old 02-19-2010, 01:01 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Are the sinks draining? How about the shower/tub. Is it just one toilet or all of them. Isolate the problem.

First thing you need to do.
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Old 02-19-2010, 02:33 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
It does take a bit of practice. Once in the pipes it is fine, but if you leave too much slack it could take off an arm. My neighbor showed me how to use it. It has a footpad for control, so you need to be coordinated enough to take your foot off the pad if it starts shaking. And always work in pairs.

However, I'm not particularly coordinated but I can use it with no problems, and it is very satisfying to do it yourself.

Thanks; this is interesting. My problem area is not a toilet but rather the drainage where my kitchen and laundry room sink pipes run off under the house. There is an easy access point, so my only fear is cracking a pipe in an inaccessible area underneath the house.
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  #36  
Old 02-19-2010, 04:37 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by Tom Tildrum View Post
Thanks; this is interesting. My problem area is not a toilet but rather the drainage where my kitchen and laundry room sink pipes run off under the house. There is an easy access point, so my only fear is cracking a pipe in an inaccessible area underneath the house.
Here is a picture of an electric snake. (Click on the picture to enlarge). The way I think it works is that the claw at the end expands to fill the pipe and to scrape out the gunk all through it. It thus doesn't have enough play to break it under normal circumstances. if you have a big root in your line, then I can see it bouncing off and making things worse, but then you already have problems. The cable doesn't have enough play to do much damage. The danger outside is not so much the cable hitting you, but having an arm or something caught in the middle of cable coiling up. You actually push the cable in (with gloves) so it isn't even turning on the outside.
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  #37  
Old 02-19-2010, 04:41 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by enipla View Post
Are the sinks draining? How about the shower/tub. Is it just one toilet or all of them. Isolate the problem.

First thing you need to do.
Even when my situation was so bad that the shower backed up (don't even think about this ) the sink drained. The difference in distance from the street might mask a sewer problem. The Rooter people attacked the toilet by itself, and so never fixed the problem. Another toilet, closer to the street, also never backed up.
Any time a sink has backed up for us, it was purely local and could be fixed with Draino.
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  #38  
Old 02-19-2010, 04:58 PM
gaffa gaffa is offline
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And remember, that if you do this you will have to replace the wax seal between toilet and floor. The good news is that wax seals are about the cheapest things sold in hardware stores.
Seconded. I'd say whenever you pull a toilet always replace the wax seal. And clean the surface on the underside of the toilet that meets the wax seal. Remember, this the the only thing between what is coming out of the toilet and your floor - and the ceiling below.

Hopefully that has scared people enough.
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  #39  
Old 02-19-2010, 05:26 PM
filmore filmore is offline
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If you replace the toilet, look into the Toto EcoDrake. It's a 1.6 gallon but it works fantastically. Look on the web and you'll see everyone raving about it. My Toto has been in for a year and has only clogged twice. The Toto replaced a traditional 4 gallon model that seemed to clog about once a week.
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  #40  
Old 02-19-2010, 06:49 PM
gaffa gaffa is offline
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If you replace the toilet, look into the Toto EcoDrake. It's a 1.6 gallon but it works fantastically. Look on the web and you'll see everyone raving about it. My Toto has been in for a year and has only clogged twice. The Toto replaced a traditional 4 gallon model that seemed to clog about once a week.
Another excellent toilet is the Gerber PowerFlush, but I don't think you can buy them in stores - they are only installed by professional plumbers. But the flush mechanism is built by Sloan and they supply their mechanism to a number of toilet manufacturers. The one I use in my KC apartment has two levels of water usage - .9 gallons for pee, 1.6 gallons for poop. And the .9 gal settings is usually more than enough for most bowel movements.
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  #41  
Old 02-20-2010, 06:31 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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I know this has been mentioned in passing, but I can add a bit of info. If you get a gurgling noise when you flush - it could come from a sink or tub as well - the air vent is partially clogged.

If you don't mind scampering up on your roof, this is a very easy fix. Bring your garden hose up there and 'snake' the vent with the hose, as far down as you can go. I did this, felt the obstruction (leaves) way down below, and busted it up with the hose. Worked perfectly.

Only thing is, when I pulled my hose up it was covered in poo.
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  #42  
Old 02-21-2010, 11:45 PM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Only thing is, when I pulled my hose up it was covered in poo.
What is this board coming to?
Thanks for the chuckle!
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  #43  
Old 02-22-2010, 08:21 AM
Serenata67 Serenata67 is offline
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Originally Posted by gonzomax View Post
My wife plugs the upstairs one regularly. I tell her we have 2 inch pipes and she has 3 inch poops.
Are you my husband? He's always telling me my poops are too big. I seem to be the only one that clogs the toilet with my poops.
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  #44  
Old 02-23-2010, 03:40 PM
BCHH BCHH is offline
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Our house has Kohler low flow toilets. We had the very same ones in our last house and they VERY rarely required a plunge or even a second flush. But, the stools on the second floor of our current house seem to need plunging quite often, one of them requires it probably 75% of the time. The one on the first floor and the one in the basement both flush like champs. I don't know if being on the second floor could affect the water pressure enough to make a difference, but that's the only thing I can come up with.
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  #45  
Old 02-23-2010, 04:29 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Originally Posted by BCHH View Post
Our house has Kohler low flow toilets. We had the very same ones in our last house and they VERY rarely required a plunge or even a second flush. But, the stools on the second floor of our current house seem to need plunging quite often, one of them requires it probably 75% of the time. The one on the first floor and the one in the basement both flush like champs. I don't know if being on the second floor could affect the water pressure enough to make a difference, but that's the only thing I can come up with.
Not likely that water pressure has much to do with it. Most toilets aren't flushed directly by the water pressure, but by the tank of water on the back of the toilet. Low water pressure just means that it takes longer for that tank to refill after flushing.

A more likely possibility is the vent piping for that upstairs toilet. If that is blocked, there will be problems flushing. And there are probably separate vent pipes for each toilet.
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  #46  
Old 02-23-2010, 04:35 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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Originally Posted by BCHH View Post
Our house has Kohler low flow toilets. We had the very same ones in our last house and they VERY rarely required a plunge or even a second flush. But, the stools on the second floor of our current house seem to need plunging quite often, one of them requires it probably 75% of the time. The one on the first floor and the one in the basement both flush like champs. I don't know if being on the second floor could affect the water pressure enough to make a difference, but that's the only thing I can come up with.
i agree that a vent problem is likely.

on the lower floors there is a lot of air in the vents that could be compressed before it would provide back pressure. on the second floor the air in the vent gets compressed rapidly. check for a restriction in that vent on the roof.
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  #47  
Old 02-24-2010, 07:45 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
i agree that a vent problem is likely.

on the lower floors there is a lot of air in the vents that could be compressed before it would provide back pressure. on the second floor the air in the vent gets compressed rapidly. check for a restriction in that vent on the roof.
...or more likely the other toilets are on a separate vent stack or venting through somewhere else.
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  #48  
Old 02-24-2010, 08:12 AM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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i agree that a vent problem is likely.

on the lower floors there is a lot of air in the vents that could be compressed before it would provide back pressure. on the second floor the air in the vent gets compressed rapidly. check for a restriction in that vent on the roof.
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Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
...or more likely the other toilets are on a separate vent stack or venting through somewhere else.
i've seen it happen a few times in locations with a single vent so either case could be true.
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  #49  
Old 02-24-2010, 08:48 AM
Don't Call Me Shirley Don't Call Me Shirley is offline
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Originally Posted by Sateryn76 View Post
We just put a Eijer in a totally new bathroom, and I'm having problems with clogs.

All the pipe runs were new, and the toilet usually flushes fine. But, I've had to stop flushing tampons, and my daughter often clogs the toilet with her poops.

There is no backup in any other sink or toilet in the house. I have no idea why this happens, but it drives me crazy, and makes me afraid we're going to have to rip out all of the plumbing we installed to redo it
Sounds to me like the wax ring is improperly installed. If you don't get it centered just right, it can partially block the pipe. Check that before you rip out all the plumbing.
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