The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-22-2010, 09:44 AM
MissTake MissTake is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Here
Posts: 3,762
Bifocals: Do not want, but need.

At my last eye examination the optometrist gently suggested I look into getting bifocals. I was 39. In the words of my daughter, I flipped a tit. No, no, no too young! Bifocals are for old people!

I used to work in an opthalmic lab, and I know poor vision is not necessarily age related, but it's one of those things I can't delete from my brain. Old = bifocals. My (non-bio) parents got bifocals when they were in their 50's. My friends in their late 40's are now starting to have to move up to bifocals. Dammit, I'm 40.

I'm near sighted, have single vision glasses, not a super heavy prescription (L -1.5, R -1.25). I can do okay without them if necessary. However, I do a lot of fine work, such as cross stitch, and I must take off the specs in order to see what I'm doing. Without my glasses I can see close up very well. Doing the specs on/ specs off thing triggers headaches, and I'm not adept enough to wear my glasses down my nose so I can look over them. They fall off.

Thanks to a screw up with my flex medical account, I have a decent chunk of money that will end up going to my buying new glasses, and I think I have to get over my ageism and get bifocals.

How old were you when you had to 'move up' to bifocals? Are the difficult to get used to?
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 02-22-2010, 09:51 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
I'm in my late 30s (and work in ophthalmology!) and have worn progressive bifocals for a decade or two, not for presbyopia but to reduce eyestrain when I do close-up work. It did occur to me recently that I will probably not notice presbyopia when it starts since I already have bifocals! I am nearsighted and have a strong prescription.

You do have to get used to holding your head a certain way/looking down when you're reading/doing close work; you can't just put your head down and look straight ahead. It also helps to have a slightly larger than usual lens to give you more of an area to look through, and certain extremely narrow glasses cannot accommodate a bifocal or progressive bifocal lens. I'm very much used to it after all of this time.

I'd recommend one of two options (speaking as a glasses wearer, not as someone in ophthalmology). Either get progressive bifocals so you don't have that line and the quick change in prescription, or if you think you can cope with swapping out glasses, go to a pharmacy and check out their reading glasses, and buy the one that suits you.

Last edited by Ferret Herder; 02-22-2010 at 09:52 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-22-2010, 09:54 AM
Icarus Icarus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: In front of my PC, y tu?
Posts: 2,897
From my experience, age 40 is when folks start needing bifocals. You need to adjust your expectations.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-22-2010, 09:57 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icarus View Post
From my experience, age 40 is when folks start needing bifocals. You need to adjust your expectations.
Yeah, the doctors I work with always say "Oh, you're 40/almost 40" when someone complains about trouble reading print. You get the ones who don't need them until late 40s or so (like my dad, who never needed any glasses until that point), but +/-40 isn't odd.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-22-2010, 09:59 AM
kunilou kunilou is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Posts: 17,588
I was in my early 40's. On the other hand, I'd been wearing glasses since I was 12, so it wasn't that big a shock.

Of course if you only need biofocals for a few specific things, you can always get half-glasses with your distance prescription and look over them for the close-up work.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:00 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 29,009
I started using reading glasses in my mid-40s, but didn't need bifocals until I was over 50. I probably will need tri-focals in a few more years. Not crazy about the progressive lenses, I can tell you.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:01 AM
3waygeek 3waygeek is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
I got my first set 4 years ago at age 43; no problem adapting to them. Just got my second set about 8 months ago -- the distance prescription is basically the same as it's been since I was in my teens, but the near vision has gotten a bit worse over the last few years.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:33 AM
kopek kopek is offline
born to be shunned
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Southwestern PA
Posts: 3,140
42. I tried regular bifocals and almost killed myself; literally. For the things I do and how I do them I took the bullet and went "no-line" or "progressive". It still took me about a week to fully adjust but at least it didn't involve any more stitches or trips to the ER.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:45 AM
MissTake MissTake is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Here
Posts: 3,762
I can see close up just fine without glasses at all. That is how I sew / read / do anything close up. I just cannot do any of that with my glasses on.

I find I'm doing like my dad did - if TheKid brings me something to read, I have to hold it out arms length if I'm wearing my specs, as it's slightly blurry. If I take them off, all is dandy.

I figure I would go with progressives, FWIW. They seem to be the rule, not the exception nowadays.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:48 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 35,565
Late 40s for bifocals.

It took me a little time -- maybe two weeks -- before I got comfortable, but I got progressive bifocals so I didn't worry about the lines.
__________________
"East is east and west is west and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like prunes than rhubarb does."
Purveyor of fine science fiction since 1982.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:53 AM
Saintly Loser Saintly Loser is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
I got bifocals when I was 40. I'm 50 now. I found it very easy to get used to bifocals. Progressives, on the the other hand, drive me nuts. I cannot wear them (although now that I seem to be headed for trifocals, maybe it's time to try again).

You can get bifocals with an invisible line (not progressives - I forget what they're called. A "blended" bifocal? Not sure), or you can refuse to give in to vanity and get the kind with the line in the lens. I've had both, and I find the line a little bit easier to deal with. What Ferret Herder says about narrow lenses is true in my experience -- you need room for both parts of the bifocal for them to be comfortable.

Really, once you've worn them for a week or two, you'll forget all about them. They're much better than switching glasses for distance and reading or close-up work. I wear my glasses from the minute I wake up until I'm about to go to sleep. No problem.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-22-2010, 11:12 AM
kelly5078 kelly5078 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
I started wearing glasses when I was 10, for myopia.

I started wearing bifocals at about 40. Tried progressives first, but couldn't stand them. Bifocals were a great relief, and took no time to get used to. Really not a big deal at all.

Seven or eight years later I had to move to trifocals. They took a little while to get used to, because you lose much more of the distance lens area. They never become as non-intrusive as bifocals, particularly when dealing things at different heights on grocery shelves, or when looking at paintings in a museum. I find myself constantly moving my head trying to get things right. But bifocals are just not enough for me anymore.

Face it, you're getting older. You have to do things to make life easier; once you get bifocals you won't have any desire to go back, I guarantee.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-22-2010, 11:22 AM
Wile E Wile E is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
I have the same problem, nearsighted and doing things like watching tv and doing something up close meant lifting up my glasses to see up close and I also got a lot of headaches. I got progressive bifocals and I never got the hang of them so I usually just don't do up close stuff while watching tv anymore. So my next glasses will just be my nearsighted prescription. If it turns out I need reading glasses I'll just get separate glasses. But apparently I am an exception and bifocals aren't really that hard to adjust to.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-22-2010, 12:02 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Lethbridge, AB.
Posts: 48,108
I noticed that I couldn't see as well up close through my glasses the day I turned 40 - yup, right on schedule. At 43, I was supposed to get bifocals last year, but I didn't bother. I think I will get them this year - it's starting to get bad enough that I want my glasses to work better for me. I'm a little concerned that I'm going to have a hard time getting used to them - I can only have plastic lenses, nothing fancier than that because I'm extremely sensitive to chromatic aberrations, I think it's called - I tried the new Featherwates® a couple of years ago, and my response was, "GET THEM OFF GET THEM OFF GET THEM OFF!" I got massive headaches and disorientation from them. You know, I can't see those 3-D pictures and the 3-D glasses at the movies really bother me, too - I think I'm seeing a pattern here.

Anyway, I think I'll try progressives first, then go to the hidden line ones if those don't work. Or just the regular ones with a line - what the hell. I'm not looking to impress anyone with how young and beautiful I am.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-22-2010, 01:28 PM
Baal Houtham Baal Houtham is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
For a long time, Lou Reed wore glasses with flip up lenses. I'm not sure where he got them, but apparently they're available.

Like the OP, I'm nearsighted enough that I can read closeup without glasses. So, usually I take off my progressive lenses when I want to read. That way I can move the book around, rather than always peering downward through the close-focus part of the glasses.

However every year my eyes get a little less flexible and now my depth of focus is limited to about 2". If the book is closer than 5 inches, it's too close. If it's further than 7 inches, it's too far.

I'll be unhappy if/when my little focus spot goes away.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-22-2010, 07:53 PM
fireman fireman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
If you have to get them, get the best.


SPOILER:
Vario Physio 360 Progressive Bifocals


More expensive, but worth the price. I've worn bifocals for 30 years, and these are the clearest and sharpest I have had.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:25 PM
NicePete NicePete is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
At my last eye appointment the doctor told me I needed bifocals but I could wait another year if I wanted. I gave into vanity and I've regretted it ever since. I'm so tired of putting my glasses on my forehead. And I'd like to be able smoothly switch between watching TV and reading. Bifocals here I come.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:36 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
Elephant Whisperer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bangkok
Posts: 29,166
Sorry if I've missed this above, but is it true that some people simply cannot get used to bifocals? I've heard that, and if it's true, I suspect I could be one of them, as my eyes are so sensitive.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-22-2010, 11:00 PM
missred missred is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Mid-forties here and have worn bifocals for twenty-something years.

My first pair took a couple of days to get used to (stairs were my big adjustment) but nothing that sent me to the ER. My second pair were the then new progressives. I hated them and immediately went back to the ones with lines. YMMV.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-23-2010, 03:40 AM
Floater Floater is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
Sorry if I've missed this above, but is it true that some people simply cannot get used to bifocals? I've heard that, and if it's true, I suspect I could be one of them, as my eyes are so sensitive.
I am one. An optometrist once persuaded me to buy a pair but I just couldn't adapt to them. All my life I have simply taken my glasses off when reading and I can't see any reason not to keep doing it.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-23-2010, 12:26 PM
Corrvin Corrvin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
I'm 35. I'm currently muddling along with reading glasses and distance glasses. It's a pain in the behind to switch pairs every time I want to talk to a co-worker, then go back to my computer screen.

It's not vanity, it's the cost of progressive lenses plus my thick prescription (I'm terribly nearsighted). I'll probably wince and cough up the money out of my savings eventually, with the benefit that since I'm only 35, people who assume I'm 40+ will think I look GREAT. And what's wrong with that, I ask!
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-23-2010, 01:38 PM
Umbriel2 Umbriel2 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2006
I'm extremely nearsighted, and just got progressive bifocals last year (age 45). I was finding I had trouble reading computer monitors and print at reading distance. I would have found switching glasses extremely annoying, and found I adjusted to the bifocals in about a week. I'm not really conscious of "using" them, though I do occasionally find them annoying if I'm trying to look at a distant object while reclining.

I continue to take my glasses off for detail work or fine print, as my nearsightedness is severe enough to give me close-in magnification.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-23-2010, 03:17 PM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 28,506
I got mine at 45. I got progressives. I love them. It took a little while to get used to, but I wouldn't have it any other way.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-23-2010, 04:00 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Since you have the money in your flex account, besides getting the bifocals, consider getting a second pair that is fixed focus at a near distance, i.e. your computer screen. If you spend any considerable amount of time on a computer, this is worthwhile.

I use progressive bifocals, but noticed that I was getting a sore neck after hours of computer work. I realized that I was constantly tilting my head back to look through the bottom part of the bifocals at the computer screen, and ending up with neck aches. So I asked about a fixed focus pair at the optical store; they said "oh, you mean computer glasses". It's pretty common, and they are quite used to doing it. And it cost me less than $75 for them.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-23-2010, 04:31 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Stockton
Posts: 8,091
I got progressives in my mid-forties, somewhere. It was easy to get used to them and much easier than wearing reading glasses. I think I had four sets of reading glasses, just so there would be a set wherever I needed them. I still have a couple of them stashed for the days that I forget to put the bifocals on in the morning.

My eye guy says I am following the average age/vision arc exactly, so I probably won't have to change my prescription for another five years. I hope so. I'll be able to get prescription sunglasses on my insurance next year if I don't have to swap out my regulars.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 02-23-2010, 10:36 PM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTake View Post
How old were you when you had to 'move up' to bifocals? Are the difficult to get used to?
How Ols was I when I had get bifocals!!!!!!!!!! I was 50 when I got my first set of glasses. And I had to start with bifocals. forget the age thing or feeling old because of bifocals, the rest of my body tells me that I have been around for a while.

I hate needing glasses. Now with glasses I can not read easly small print, or things way off. 20 Years ago when I would get my eyes examined I would read the "Made in the USA" line on the bottom of the charts. Now I have to have my glasses on to type this. I hat glasses.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 02-23-2010, 11:52 PM
Enright3 Enright3 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 5,553
Early 40s for me. I have progressive bifocals and they're great. You know they also make bifocal contact lenses. They take a little more getting used to though.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 02-24-2010, 10:11 AM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Why ever would you want bifocals if you can read/do close work by taking your glasses off? I started taking my glasses off to read sometime (don't recall when) in my mid-40s and lived mostly without glasses for a decade or so. Finally around 65, I got drugstore reading glasses and a few years later broke down and got progressives. They work fine.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 02-24-2010, 09:29 PM
Visual Purple Visual Purple is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Some people don't adjust to bifocals--some can't stand progressives in particular. My mother can't stand either, and has always just bought multiple pairs of cheap glasses. I'll be like that too, I'm afraid. I've had a strong prescription for years, and the fact that I'm often looking through parts other than the sweet spot still bugs me every day. Put further junk in my vision, and I'll be a basket case. At this point, I have reading glasses--a weaker version of my regular glasses. (My eyes are bad enough that I need some myopia correction to avoid having to put the book inches from my face.) If I'm reading a lot, I put them on. For most things, my arms are plenty long, or, if it's really small, I put my face a few inches away and look over my glasses. So far, so good, but I can't imagine what I'll do when I lose more flexibility.

I am wondering why you're getting a recommendation for bifocals if you can read easily with your glasses off. If your eyes are fine to read, taking glasses on and off should be easier on your eyes than having the distortions in the lenses associated with bifocals/progressives. Do you have some astigmatism correction you're losing when you aren't wearing your glasses?
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 02-24-2010, 09:46 PM
Savannah Savannah is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
I'm 44, and my latest prescription is for "progressive lenses". I've procrastinated getting them filled. Not because it makes me feel "old"*, but because I'm a procrastinator in general.


*Liar! I am a liar!
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 02-25-2010, 02:56 AM
SecTech SecTech is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
I was still in my 20s when the Navy medic told me I needed bifocals. Right. What I needed was simple reading glasses, as I am farsighted, but with astigmatism, which was causing headaches when reading for more than 2030 minutes at a time.
First bifocals came in my 40s, because I worked an "inside-outside" job, and had to read manuals, specs, etc. while in the field. The major portion of the lenses were nearly clear glass.
I tried the progressives when I "came in from the cold" a bit and sat at a computer terminal for hours at a time.
My recommendation to MissTake is go for the ultralight, frameless, progressive lenses. The most expensive you can afford will serve you well.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 02-25-2010, 03:33 AM
Zoe Zoe is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
I think I was in my late thirties when I went to bi-focals. Didn't think a thing about it since I didn't have to have those lines.

I began wearing glasses at 14 months with a patch over my strong eye to try to strengthen my weak eye. I would look sideways to see around the patch. Eventually there was a little hole over my good eye just enough for me to see out, but not large enough to be noticed.

So the right eye didn't develop much strength. It is 20/400 and corrects to 20/200 with glasses. That little bit of light an movement awareness comes in handy.

Worrying about how old I was when I needed bi-focals never entered my mind. I cried with relief to find out that I wasn't going blind.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 02-25-2010, 07:30 AM
MissTake MissTake is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Here
Posts: 3,762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visual Purple View Post
I am wondering why you're getting a recommendation for bifocals if you can read easily with your glasses off. If your eyes are fine to read, taking glasses on and off should be easier on your eyes than having the distortions in the lenses associated with bifocals/progressives. Do you have some astigmatism correction you're losing when you aren't wearing your glasses?
No, no astigmatism. If I don't have my glasses on - say I'm sewing - rather than putting it down, I just squint and try to focus when I look up. It leads to blinding headaches. Laziness, I know. I've tried to stop trying to focus when I look up, but it's habit.

I called and made an appointment for a check up. First available appointment?
April 2nd. Oh well.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 02-26-2010, 01:02 AM
beo.thuck beo.thuck is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Ben Franklin is largely credited with the invention of bifocals. Got to love Ben.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 02-26-2010, 02:36 AM
lee lee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by t-bonham@scc.net View Post
Since you have the money in your flex account, besides getting the bifocals, consider getting a second pair that is fixed focus at a near distance, i.e. your computer screen. If you spend any considerable amount of time on a computer, this is worthwhile.

I use progressive bifocals, but noticed that I was getting a sore neck after hours of computer work. I realized that I was constantly tilting my head back to look through the bottom part of the bifocals at the computer screen, and ending up with neck aches. So I asked about a fixed focus pair at the optical store; they said "oh, you mean computer glasses". It's pretty common, and they are quite used to doing it. And it cost me less than $75 for them.
I have been wearing bifocals since I was 16. I think I might just get some computer glasses. I noticed my two year old son craning his neck at the computer like I do with my bifocals.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 02-27-2010, 11:26 AM
old_joe old_joe is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTake View Post
At my last eye examination the optometrist gently suggested I look into getting bifocals. I was 39. In the words of my daughter, I flipped a tit. No, no, no too young! Bifocals are for old people!
Oh Yes that time of you life when you are really, finally OLD! I went to 50, my eye doc was amazed. My wife had to have bi before me Heh! that was great! I went straight to Tri's and love them No trouble at all getting used to them etc. I did ask for the better ones though, If I remember correctly they were 700 or 800 bucks.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 02-27-2010, 11:36 AM
Katriona Katriona is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
From what my eye doctor said last year, I'll probably be getting them this year (age 41).

My husband got them last year, and said the hardest thing to get used to was going down the stairs, but as long as he remembers to point the end of his nose directly at where he wants to go, he's fine.

Great. My nose is a bit crooked, too!
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 02-27-2010, 12:46 PM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
I'm 42. I wear regular 'ol glasses. But I can't see anything up close.

When I need to look at something up close, I either:

a) remove my glasses, or
b) peer beneath my glasses

So why get bifocals?
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 02-27-2010, 02:34 PM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,938
Around 43 or so for bifocals, I think. I hate the very idea of progressives - you know they can't possibly make them work right in the bottom half except for a narrow band up the center? The math doesn't allow it.

Then my neck started hurting from craning it to look at the PC screen, and not too much later after physical therapy and whatnot I got the bottom three neck vertibrae fused. I think the whole glasses deal just accelerated a problem that would have landed pretty soon anyway, but computer specs are a great idea indeed.

So, bifocals are a great idea at 40. You still have plenty of time left to enjoy them....
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 02-27-2010, 02:47 PM
DivineComedienne DivineComedienne is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
I've been exceedingly nearsighted and started wearing glasses in 4th grade. I switched to contacts at age 15 and I love them.

In my mid-forties, I noticed that my close-up vision wasn't quite so sharp - threading a needle, reading fine print on a medicine bottle, etc. My eye doctor adjusted my contacts so that I have "mono-vision" - that is, my left eye is adjusted to see things close-up, and my right eye is adjusted for distance.

After a year or so, I realized that my distance vision was not perfect; signs were slightly blurry, especially at night or in rainy weather. The eye doctor said that mono-vision could adjust things only so much - he could fix it and then I could put on reading glasses for up-close work. I didn't want to be bothered putting on glasses a hundred times a day, so I had him adjust my close-up vision so it was nice and sharp, my "middle" vision is pretty good, and now I have "distance" glasses that I only put on when I drive at night or if I need to see something far away very sharply.

The only problem I find is when I come inside from the car still wearing my glasses, I sometimes forget to take them off, until I try to have a conversation with someone and I notice that they look blurry.

Last edited by DivineComedienne; 02-27-2010 at 02:48 PM..
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.