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Old 02-22-2010, 07:48 PM
PokerAKQJT PokerAKQJT is offline
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How do I dispose of old Kitchen Knives?

My former roommate left behind a set of kitchen knives, the kind that are in a block of wood. How should I safely dispose of these knives? I feel weird just tossing them in the trash where someone could accidentally get hold of them and injure themselves.

Thank you.
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Old 02-22-2010, 07:50 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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Craigslist?

Freecycle?
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Old 02-22-2010, 07:52 PM
Kolga Kolga is offline
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Either Craiglist or Freecycle, as KneadToKnow stated, or Goodwill, ARC, Salvation Army...
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Old 02-22-2010, 07:54 PM
Canadjun Canadjun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PokerAKQJT View Post
My former roommate left behind a set of kitchen knives, the kind that are in a block of wood. How should I safely dispose of these knives? I feel weird just tossing them in the trash where someone could accidentally get hold of them and injure themselves.

Thank you.
How about wrapping a few layers of duct tape around the blades?
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Old 02-22-2010, 08:42 PM
toofs toofs is offline
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Go outside and try to cut out a piece of the concrete sidewalk or curb. The concrete wins, the edge is gone, and the knives are no more dangerous than a screwdriver.
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Old 02-22-2010, 09:10 PM
R. P. McMurphy R. P. McMurphy is offline
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Go outside and try to cut out a piece of the concrete sidewalk or curb. The concrete wins, the edge is gone, and the knives are no more dangerous than a screwdriver.
But what about the points? That's what pierces the garbage bags and puts the sanitation workers on disability.
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Old 02-22-2010, 11:39 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
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Take some corrugated cardboard, like a box flap, and slide each knife into the corrugated edge. The cardboard essentially makes a sheath. Best to cut a separate hunk of carboard for each, maybe an inch longer than the blade length and 1/2-3/4 inch wider than the blade height.

Much simpler/safer for you than wrapping in duct tape. Also safe for the garbage crew.
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Old 02-22-2010, 11:50 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Either Craiglist or Freecycle, as KneadToKnow stated, or Goodwill, ARC, Salvation Army...
Homeless shelter, women's shelter... Not that they'll just issue them to someone on the street; they try to find housing for people, and they often give them housewares to get started.
  #9  
Old 02-23-2010, 12:05 AM
Kimstu Kimstu is offline
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Second the motion for donating them somewhere they can be reused and/or sold. In fact, all used household items that are still usable should be donated rather than thrown away, if possible. Somebody will almost certainly be able to use them, and it reduces trash and waste.

(Note that most donation centers won't accept stained, torn or broken items, and some have restrictions on certain kinds of items; check in advance before carting over your stuff.)
  #10  
Old 02-23-2010, 12:52 AM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
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Thrift store, where I buy all my kitchen knives. Amazing that so many people seem not to know that they can be sharpened. The older carbon steel blades hold an edge much better than today's default stainless steel junk. Yeah you have to keep them dry or oiled so they don't rust.Totally worth the hassle.
  #11  
Old 02-23-2010, 01:31 AM
Magiver Magiver is offline
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Thrift store, where I buy all my kitchen knives. Amazing that so many people seem not to know that they can be sharpened. The older carbon steel blades hold an edge much better than today's default stainless steel junk. Yeah you have to keep them dry or oiled so they don't rust.Totally worth the hassle.
Second. there is no reason to turn something useful into trash.
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Old 02-23-2010, 02:09 AM
bagga bagga is offline
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As others said, you should give them away. But you're really over-fussing this. Tin can lids, broken glass, sharp pieces of metal or plastic - the trash is full of dangerous objects and people are accordingly careful. You've no cause for concern on that count.
  #13  
Old 02-23-2010, 09:43 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Third on donating them - seriously, if they're still usable give them to someone who will use them.
  #14  
Old 02-23-2010, 09:56 AM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Yeah, when you break a glass do you wrap it in duct tape? Doubt it.
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